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Fakhira Riaz

Bio: Fakhira Riaz is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Conversation & Urdu. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 26 citations.
Topics: Conversation, Urdu

Papers
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Dissertation
01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: In this article, an ethnographic study was conducted to explore the status of Punjabi language in our society by looking at the language usage and linguistic practices of native speakers residing in selected urban and rural areas.
Abstract: Pakistan is a land of linguistic diversity having more than sixty languages. Punjabi, along with its numerous mutually intelligible dialects, is an ancient language.It is mainly spoken in the Pakistani province of Punjab and Indian Punjab in the subcontinent.It is a member of the Indo-Aryan branch of the Indo-European language family.The aim of this ethnographic study is to explore the status of Punjabi language in our society by looking at the language usage and linguistic practices of Punjabi native speakers residing in selected urban and rural areas.Ten families, five from urban area and five from rural area, participated in the study.The participants were selected on the basis of their educational level,marital status, monthly income, occupation, family background and the size of land owned by them.The theoretical framework which informs this research is the constructivist qualitative paradigm.The tools of data collection include semi structured interviews and recordings of informal conversation of the research participants.The analysis of the collected data reveals that in the urban areas, Punjabi language is not the dominant medium of communication among the research participants. The participants do not consider it important and worthwhile to maintain Punjabi language, as they do not see it as economically advantageous and profitable to them.It is just a part of their cultural heritage, but they do not use it for communicative purposes.In the rural areas, however, the research participants expressed a strong sense of association and affiliation with Punjabi language; Punjabi language is their dominant medium of communication with others; they consider Punjabi an inevitable part of their cultural heritage and identity; they support the idea of learning English and Urdu languages but not at the cost of Punjabi language.These findings suggest that language desertion is an urban phenomenon, as Punjabi language is not maintained by the urban research participants due to certain wider socio-political factors which have disrupted and distorted the status of Punjabi language while consolidating the role of English and Urdu in the society.

26 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Reading a book as this basics of qualitative research grounded theory procedures and techniques and other references can enrich your life quality.

13,415 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors apply the principles of measurement and research design to the evaluation process through several ex- ex-procedure variables, such as independent, dependent, and moderator variables.
Abstract: to many, however, it constantly appears as an instructional problem. The final two chapters serve as excellent summary statements. Chapter 13 emphasizes the application of previous text material to the classroom situation. Of great significance is the author's discussion of commonly defined independent, dependent, and moderator variables. The final chapter focuses on evaluation in the overall sense, particularly as it relates to programs of study. The principles of measurement and research design are applied to the evaluation process through several ex-

6,807 citations

04 Mar 2010
TL;DR: Recording of presentation introducing narrative analysis, outlining what it is, why it can be a useful approach, how to do it and where to find out more.
Abstract: Recording of presentation introducing narrative analysis, outlining what it is, why it can be a useful approach, how to do it and where to find out more. Presentation given at methods@manchester seminar at University of Manchester on 4 March 2010.

3,188 citations

01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: This book discusses the development of English as a global language in the 20th Century and some of the aspects of its development that have changed since the publication of the first edition.
Abstract: A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library ISBN 0 521 82347 1 hardback ISBN 0 521 53032 6 paperback Contents List of tables page vii Preface to the second edition ix Preface to the first edition xii 1 Why a global language? 1 What is a global language? 3 What makes a global language? 7 Why do we need a global language? 11 What are the dangers of a global language? 14 Could anything stop a global language? 25 A critical era 27 2 Why English? The historical context 29 Origins 30 America 31 Canada 36 The Caribbean 39 Australia and New Zealand 40 South Africa 43 South Asia 46 Former colonial Africa 49 Southeast Asia and the South Pacific 54 A world view 59 v Contents

1,857 citations