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Farzin Vejdani

Bio: Farzin Vejdani is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Folklore & Ethnography. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 8 citations.

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TL;DR: The authors traces the emergence of folklore studies and ethnography in interwar Iran and argues that these disciplines were part of larger nationalist projects of representing and speaking for the “masses.”
Abstract: This paper traces the emergence of folklore studies and ethnography in interwar Iran. It argues that these disciplines were part of larger nationalist projects of representing and speaking for the “masses.” The first part of the paper explores how and why a number of Iranian intellectuals engaged in folklore studies after a period of prolonged political activism in the first few decades of the 20th century. The second part of the paper examines cultural institutions established by the state, mainly in the late 1930s, in an attempt to appropriate and institutionalize folklore studies and ethnography for the purposes of nation building. These efforts were fraught with ambivalences because the “masses” were simultaneously praised as repositories of “authenticity” and looked down upon as a potential source of “backwardness.”

9 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The HRAF material is available in duplicate form at 16 university libraries and consists of scientific material on human relations, reproduced, organized in 707 categories, and filed as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The HRAF material is available in duplicate form at 16 university libraries and consists of scientific material on human relations, reproduced, organized in 707 categories, and filed. This article, a description of the files' organization and uses, originally appeared in somewhat lengthier form in the American Library Association's journal, College and Research Libraries, XIX (March, 1958), 111-117.

45 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article explored how railway technology was incorporated into the everyday lives of Iranians during the second quarter of the 20th century, focusing on spatial discourses and practices around the Iranian railway, and argued that the railway space was conducive to fragmented experiences among its diverse occupants, who were divided by religion, socioeconomic status, cultural orientation, and ethnicity.
Abstract: Exploring how railway technology was incorporated into the everyday lives of Iranians during the second quarter of the 20th century, this article focuses on spatial discourses and practices around the Iranian railway. The first part investigates Iranian journalists' construction of the railway traveler prototype as the propagator of modernity prior to the completion of the Trans-Iranian Railway in 1938. The second part shows how in the 1940s the railway space became a microcosm of the heterogeneous Iranian nation, and explores how middle-class travelers experienced the railway space. I argue that the railway space, rather than creating a homogeneous experience of railway journeys, was conducive to fragmented experiences among its diverse occupants, who were divided by religion, socioeconomic status, cultural orientation, and ethnicity. The visibility of heterogeneity in the railway space compelled modern middle-class travelers to consolidate their class identity and distinguish themselves from the rest of Iranian society. Wanting to achieve a homogeneously Europeanized Iran, they also felt compelled to travel the country more extensively to create a national community connected through direct interaction.

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the Tahmineh and Rostam episode is compared vis-a-vis both the pre-modern scribal interventions in the manuscript tradition of the poem, as well as two oral presentations of the same episode by traditional storytellers, as preserved in their prompt-books (tumārs) and in recorded performances from the twentieth century.
Abstract: The Tahmineh and Rostam episode, as presented in modern text-critical editions of Ferdowsi's Shahnameh, is compared vis-a-vis both the pre-modern scribal interventions in the manuscript tradition of the poem, as well as two oral presentations of the same episode by traditional storytellers (naqqālān), as preserved in their prompt-books (tumārs) and in recorded performances from the twentieth century. The mise-en-scene, the social circmstances, as well as the expansive nature of such oral performances, are described, and a translation of an oral version of the Rostam and Tahmineh episode is given. The narrative strategies employed to negotiate the intersection of new episodes or contemporary moralistic considerations with the written text of Ferdowsi's Shahnameh are then explored, analyzing the nature, motivations and functions of the scribal and oral interpolations to the Tahmineh episode, and demonstrating how modernizing reinterpretations impart a certain dynamism to the living Shāhnāmeh tradition. The ...

5 citations