scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Ffion Haf Llewelyn

Bio: Ffion Haf Llewelyn is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 27 citations.

Papers
More filters

Cited by
More filters
Journal Article

133 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Wang et al. as discussed by the authors argued that legal positivism is an important legal school in western history of law, which plays a great role in the development of western legal thoughts.
Abstract: Legal positivism is an important legal school in western history of law, which plays a great role in the development of western legal thoughts. At the same time, legal positivism receives so many criticisms that people misunderstands it. In order to understand it correctly, this article firstly compares it with other similar concepts. Then this article focuses on the key topic of legal positivism: " separation thesis" and "social fact thesis". On the basis of them, this article defends for legal positivism. In the end,this article discusses the role of legal positivism in China and our suitable attitude to it.

67 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: The ways in which human rights can be used to compel an approach to cases of domestic violence which requires state action to protect those harmed by domestic abuse are discussed.
Abstract: For too long human rights have been used to support a legal approach to domestic violence which is non-interventionist. This article discusses the ways in which human rights can be used to compel an approach to cases of domestic violence which requires state action to protect those harmed by domestic abuse. It argues that the state has an obligation to protect its citizens from torture, inhuman and degrading treatment and this obligation is heightened in respect of vulnerable adults and particularly children. Further, correctly understood, rights to respect for private and family life, rather than being a barrier to state intervention can be seen as justifying it.

37 citations

Book
01 Jan 2015

23 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: The conventional wisdom in criminal law is that violence between strangers is a more serious crime than violence between individuals who know one another as mentioned in this paper, yet more violent crimes occur between people who are intimate partners, family members, friends, or acquaintances than between strangers.
Abstract: The conventional wisdom in criminal law is that violence between strangers is a more serious crime than violence between individuals who know one another. When asked about their crime concerns, most people respond that they fear becoming the victim of a violent crime at the hands of a stranger. Yet more violent crimes occur between people who are intimate partners, family members, friends, or acquaintances than between strangers. This Article identifies and examines arguments in favor of treating stranger violence more seriously, and it concludes that none of the arguments justifies the unequal treatment of stranger and non-stranger violence. The Article also identifies several affirmative reasons why violence in close personal relationships might be considered more serious than stranger violence. Ultimately, the Article concludes that non-stranger violence should be treated just as seriously as stranger violence, and it briefly explores a few practical challenges associated with the prevention and punishment of violence between non-strangers.

21 citations