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Fiona Winning

Bio: Fiona Winning is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Performing arts & Theatre director. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 1 citations.

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Journal Article
TL;DR: Fiona Winning as discussed by the authors was one of the key practitioners to emerge from the renaissance of Australian theatre in the 1960s and 1970s, and was especially marked by his total commitment to the idea of artists working together, sharing and developing skills.
Abstract: This is the text of the annual Rex Cramphorn Memorial Lecture, delivered by Fiona Winning at the Seymour Centre, Sydney, as part of the Sydney Ideas Series on 2 March, 2009. Rex Cramphorn was one of the key practitioners to emerge from the renaissance of Australian theatre in the 1960s and 1970s. His work ranged from the experimental to the classical, and was especially marked by his total commitment to the idea of artists working together, sharing and developing skills. Each year, a leading theatre practitioner is invited to deliver a lecture to celebrate Cramphorn's memory. I believed that my most important function was to establish an atmosphere in which the grace of creativity might fall on any member of the group, giving him or her the right to lead the work. Rex Cramphorn Good evening and thank you to the Rex Cramphorn Committee for inviting me to give this lecture and to Sydney Ideas for including it in their series. I didn't know Rex. I first heard of him in the early 1980s when I was a young Brisbane artist, and I only really knew his name as one of the many great artists who'd fled Bjelke-Petersen's Queensland - heading 'south' to the broader culture and expanded academic and theatre opportunities of Sydney and Melbourne. By the time I too left Queensland, Rex was directing Measure for Measure for the Adelaide Festival - a world away from my experience. But Rex's commitment to the idea of theatre as collaborative practice, rather than as a vehicle for his individual expression, was something I shared. And I want to talk today about that . . . not as a theatre director, but more broadly, as an artsworker, as a producer and as a collaborator in the architecture of our contemporary performance cultures. I speak as a freelance artsworker. Over the years, I've been a freelance theatre maker, an artistic director of a community-based theatre company and a national writers' organisation, and a director of a centre for interdisciplinary practice - always part of the small-to-medium performing arts sector. In my last job at Performance Space, I worked with development, producing and presenting organisations nationally and internationally, companies generating new work, and hundreds of independent artists working project-to-project to create new work in various clusters, ensembles or casual collaborations. In partnership with these artists and companies, Performance Space presented about fifty events a year, including residencies to develop work; interactive installations; seasons of new dance and performance works; one-off performance events; laboratories for artist-toartist exchange; and forums connecting artists with audiences in lively conversation. During that time, I worked on the development of the CarriageWorks as a new contemporary arts space and, with my colleagues, moved Performance Space from our long-term home at Cleveland Street in Redfern, into the new centre at the Eveleigh Railyards. I'd like to unpack some of that experience and learning and to make some observations about the often problematic relationships between 'hard' and 'soft' infrastructures: 'hard' being the buildings and equipment, and 'soft' being the people who work within the organisations and create various patterns of activity. How does the physical space impact on the practice and on the art produced? What are the economies of scale? What environments enable artists to create their best work and audiences to engage in a multiplicity of ways? And how might change be implemented to realise that? I hasten to add that the questions I ask, and the challenges I make in this lecture, are as much to myself - as an artsworker, a leader and a passionate audience member, as to everyone in the arts sector and beyond. First, I need to tell the story of the development of CarriageWorks. Acquisition and planning In March 2002, New South Wales Arts Minister and Premier Bob Canannounced that the Ministry for the Arts would acquire the former carriage works and blacksmith's shop at Eveleigh North for a contemporary performing arts centre. …

1 citations


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Dissertation
30 Dec 2016
TL;DR: A survey of Carriageworks can be found in this paper, where the authors discuss the effect of spatial privatisation and post-industrial charisma on artists' ability to perform emotional labour.
Abstract: ....................................................................................................................................... ii Acknowledgements .................................................................................................................. iii Table of contents ....................................................................................................................... iv List of figures ................................................................................................................................................ v Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 1 Chapter 1: Methodology and literature review ............................................................. 5 Methodology ............................................................................................................................................ 6 Between gentrification and a hard place .................................................................................. 11 Working with emotional labour ................................................................................................... 17 Notes on method and discipline ................................................................................................... 23 Chapter 2: Background on railway past and Redfern .............................................. 27 Romancing the railway .................................................................................................................... 32 Modern-day sacred land .................................................................................................................. 40 Chapter 3: Early years at Carriageworks ...................................................................... 57 A State Premier and a French theatre director take a helicopter ride ........................ 57 A Rolls Royce model stalls .............................................................................................................. 62 Managerialism versus artists’ furphy ........................................................................................ 67 A tale of two directors ...................................................................................................................... 76 Chapter 4: Carriageworks now; major Sydney institution ..................................... 80 The affect of spatial privatisation ................................................................................................ 85 Post-industrial charisma ................................................................................................................. 92 Performing authenticity ............................................................................................................... 105 Conclusion ............................................................................................................................. 116 Notes ........................................................................................................................................ 120 Bibliography ............................................................................................................................... vi Appendix ............................................................................................................................... xxviii

12 citations