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Frances Elton

Bio: Frances Elton is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Manually coded language & Home sign. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 65 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 1986-Language

392 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 2005-Language
TL;DR: It is shown that at least two pervasive types of inflectional morphology, verb agreement and classifier constructions, are iconically grounded in spatiotemporal cognition, while the sequential patterns can be traced to normal historical development.
Abstract: Sign languages have two strikingly different kinds of morphological structure: sequential and simultaneous The simultaneous morphology of two unrelated sign languages, American and Israeli Sign Language, is very similar and is largely inflectional, while what little sequential morphology we have found differs significantly and is derivational We show that at least two pervasive types of inflectional morphology, verb agreement and classifier constructions, are iconically grounded in spatiotemporal cognition, while the sequential patterns can be traced to normal historical development We attribute the paucity of sequential morphology in sign languages to their youth This research both brings sign languages much closer to spoken languages in their morphological structure and shows how the medium of communication contributes to the structure of languages

220 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on the history of deaf communities and show that the current issues have roots in the past, including the central role of education in the creation and maintenance of communities.
Abstract: ▪ Abstract Because of their deafness, deaf people have been marked as different and treated problematically by their hearing societies. Until 25 years ago, academic literature addressing deafness typically described deafness as pathology, focusing on cures or mitigation of the perceived handicap. In ethnographic accounts, interactions involving deaf people are sometimes presented as examples of how communities treat atypical members. Recently, studies of deafness have adopted more complex sociocultural perspectives, raising issues of community identity, formation and maintenance, and language ideology. Anthropological researchers have approached the study of d/Deaf communities from at least three useful angles. The first, focusing on the history of these communities, demonstrates that the current issues have roots in the past, including the central role of education in the creation and maintenance of communities. A second approach centers on emic perspectives, drawing on the voices of community members th...

161 citations