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Francis Fauquier

Bio: Francis Fauquier is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Raising (linguistics). The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 2 publications receiving 4 citations.

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Dissertation
30 Jun 2011
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigate how the clothing and textiles of the Scottish population in the long eighteenth century can be interpreted as symbols of wider cultural, social and economic practices.
Abstract: Clothing and textiles are an important means of communication, providing nuanced signals of economic and social status, occupation, and political affiliation. Consequently the study of clothing and textiles is a valuable approach to the investigation of a past society. Building on current methodological approaches associated with clothing and textile history and the study of material culture, this thesis will investigate how the clothing and textiles of the Scottish population in the long eighteenth century can be interpreted as symbols of wider cultural, social and economic practices. Studies of tartan and Highland dress have dominated the literature on historical Scottish dress and textiles, a result of these items’ intimate connection with modern Scottish identity. This thesis seeks to redress the balance by examining clothing and textiles in both the Highland and Lowland regions, in rural and urban areas, and in the experiences of the elite and non-elite sections of the population. This will be done using multiple and varied sources, including surviving artefacts, portraits, inventories, and contemporary literature. By incorporating quantifiable analysis and qualitative interpretation, this approach complements and adds to existing knowledge of Scottish clothing and textiles. The thesis begins with an examination of the clothing culture, looking at everyday clothing and its use in national, occupational, and political identities. Examination of the textile culture scrutinizes the use of textiles in literature, the economic and ideological approaches to the textile industry, and the practical motivations behind tartan manufacture. The role of ‘fashion’ in Scottish clothing and textile cultures is studied, looking at how outside fashions were received within Scotland, and how Scotland in turn influenced wider fashions. The ​ thesis provides an overview of Scottish dress and textiles in the long eighteenth ​ century demonstrating the importance such investigation can have on the ​ comprehension of the wider social and economic practices of a nation. URI http://hdl.handle.net/1842/9568 Collections History and Classics PhD thesis collection Privacy & Cookies Takedown Policy Accessibility Contact Weaving the nation: Scottish clothing and textile cultures in the Long Eighteenth century

24 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe the rise and fall of the workhouse system in connection with the developments that took place in economic thought in the transition from mercantilism to the classical tradition.
Abstract: The aim of this article is to describe the rise and fall of the workhouse system in connection with the developments that took place in economic thought in the transition from mercantilism to the Classical tradition. By examining the economic debate about wages, efficiency, labor market, workers’ mobility, and unemployment, we discuss whether the social policy shift epitomized by institutional reforms like the Gilbert Act (1782), the Rose Act (1793), and the Speenhamland system (1795) was accompanied and eventually inspired by a change in the perception of major political economy issues. In doing so, we review the writings of Jacob Vanderlint (d. 1740), George Berkeley (1685–1753), Malachy Postlethwayt (1707?–1767), Josiah Tucker (1713–1799), David Hume (1711–1776), and Adam Smith (1723-1790), among others. Although a direct influence by these writers cannot be proven, the originality of the present work rests on the effort to put into perspective the arguments elaborated by economic thinkers and the proposals made by social reformers so as to identify possible connections between economic theorizing and social legislation.

12 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the model of the siege model from Sterne's Tristram Shandy (1759-1767) is used to satirize the enthusiastic but circular participation mid-century British citizens sought to have with distant military campaigns of the Seven Years’ War (1756-63).
Abstract: Abstract:Contributing to the recent scholarship on Toby’s siege model from Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy (1759–1767), this article recognizes Toby’s activity as satirizing the enthusiastic but circular participation mid-century British citizens sought to have with the distant military campaigns of the Seven Years’ War (1756–63). The model’s particular mediation allows Toby to act out his recursive relishing of news from abroad, wholly in the grip of a participatory fascination. Furthermore, the analogy offers an unusual but productive chance to reconsider the readerly participation Sterne’s self-conscious fiction stages throughout the novel. I argue that what is revealed is a playful acknowledgment of the overdetermined scripting of representations of war.