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Author

Francis Gilbert

Other affiliations: University of London
Bio: Francis Gilbert is an academic researcher from Goldsmiths, University of London. The author has contributed to research in topics: Creative writing & Teaching method. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 13 publications receiving 37 citations. Previous affiliations of Francis Gilbert include University of London.

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TL;DR: In this paper, the author examines the author's interactions with the teaching strategy known as reciprocal teaching, sometimes also called reciprocal reading, which involves students learning to read collaboratively with a teacher.
Abstract: This article examines the author’s interactions with the teaching strategy known as Reciprocal Teaching, sometimes also called Reciprocal Reading, which involves students learning to read collabora...

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that the concept of "aesthetic learning" can be helpful for English teachers on two levels: first, it can be a useful identity for teachers and students to adopt, based upon my own experiences as a secondary English teacher, creative writer and PhD student.
Abstract: My article argues that the concept of ‘aesthetic learning’ can be helpful for English teachers on two levels. First, it can be a useful identity for English teachers and students to adopt, based upon my own experiences as a secondary English teacher, creative writer and PhD student. Second, I argue that ‘aesthetic learning’ is an effective and productive way of analysing some of the learning processes that happen in the English teacher’s classroom. In order to arrive at these conclusions, I examine my own creative writing, teaching and learning processes from which I extrapolate the notion that we are all ‘aesthetic learners’ in the sense that we learn to appreciate the qualities of the worlds we inhabit, whether these are actual or virtual. Throughout, my own writing, learning and teaching are used to illustrate my argument. In particular, the article seeks to re-position my own teaching in secondary schools within the context of ‘aesthetic learning’.

9 citations

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TL;DR: The authors argue that we need to "descend into the crypt" of creative writing, and use rigorous, academic research methods and methodologies to examine the communities that writing arises in.
Abstract: This article argues that we need to ‘descend into the crypt’ of creative writing, and use rigorous, academic research methods and methodologies to examine it. The communities that writing arises fr...

7 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article explored the blurring of truth and fiction in autobiographical writing and argued that teachers can help students if they provide students with the cloak of fiction when writing about their own lives, and that when teachers share pertinent autobiographical episodes then pupils are more willing to respond in an engaged and passionate fashion.
Abstract: This article aims to examine the benefits of teachers using their own autobiographical writing in the classroom It explores the blurring of truth and fiction in autobiographical writing and argues that teachers can help students if they provide students with the cloak of fiction when writing about their own lives Furthermore, it puts forward the case that when teachers share pertinent autobiographical episodes then pupils are more willing to respond in an engaged and passionate fashion In developing my argument, I suggest that autobiographical writing can be therapeutic in certain classroom contexts The data sources for this article are the author's own life and two case studies: an 11-year-old boy, George, and a 15-year-old girl, Eloise, both of whom were pupils of the author and wrote autobiographically for him The methodological approach is that of bricolage: chiefly, the article combines ethnographical observation with interviews and discourse analysis I also examine quantitative studies which look at the therapeutic dimensions of autobiographical writing Theoretically I draw on Friere's concept of ‘conscientization’ (Friere 1985: 49) in order to critique the ‘banking’ concept of education, which would close down opportunities for pupils to write freely about their own lives

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on the affordances of and issues surrounding the teaching of George Orwell's novel 1984 (1949) as a set text for GCSE English and English Literature in an examination-obsessed and heavily surveilled school system.
Abstract: Purpose This paper focuses upon the affordances of and issues surrounding the teaching of George Orwell’s novel 1984 (1949) as a set text for GCSE English and English Literature in an examination-obsessed and heavily surveilled school system. It considers this by focusing on the classroom practice of a beginning teacher tackling the teaching of this novel for the first time and the newly-appointed university tutor who is required to assess her teaching against a prescribed set of national Teachers’ Standards. Design/methodology/approach A case study design is employed, drawing on data from classroom observation, records of conversations and textual study. These data are analysed with reference to Perryman et al’s (2018) re-evaluation of Foucault’s panopticon (1995), a concept which explains how institutions set up surveillance systems in which people’s behaviour is shaped by their feelings of being watched. Findings In the context of her practicum school the beginning teacher adopts a particular approach to language study as a vehicle for teaching the novel 1984. This paper argues that such an approach, which finely focuses on the micro-detail of language, prevents teachers and students from seeing the big picture in Orwell’s novel and is therefore contrary to the spirit of his writing. It also restricts teachers from approaching the novel in ways which draw on students’ lived experiences as participants in the highly surveilled education system. Practical Implications The push for performativity in the current era of schooling ensures that, for English teachers, fear of failing to comply with imposed and implied norms contributes to a prevailing sense of unease about their subject. Thus persistent pressures of exam preparation and inspection-readiness drive a wedge between their subject knowledge/expertise and the classroom practices prevalent in English teaching. Social Implications English teachers and teacher educators are subject to a plethora of ‘guidelines’ which filter through at every level of education and operate in a similar way to the totalitarian figure-head of Big Brother, Orwell’s fictional dictator who dominates 1984. This paper argues that away from Big Brother’s all-seeing eye there are still, however, opportunities for those professional practices that do not fit within such parameters to be discussed, explored and shared. Originality This article offers a unique perspective on the teaching of George Orwell at the levels of school student, beginning teacher and teacher educator. The Big Brother of this article is not the Stalinist dictator of Orwell’s dystopia, instead manifesting in many different education-related personas. This Big Brother demands compliance with his fuzzy norms (Courtney, 2016; Perryman et al., 2018), rules which are deliberately vague and shifting and if contravened have far-reaching consequences for all concerned in the teaching and learning of English.

4 citations


Cited by
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TL;DR: Foucault's Discipline and Punish (1961) as discussed by the authors is a seminal work in the history of knowledge and power, tracing the genealogy of control institutions (asylums, teaching hospitals, prisons) and the human sciences symbiotically linked with them.
Abstract: Contemporary Sociology 7(5) (September 1978):566—68. When the intellectual history of our times comes to be written, that peculiarly Left Bank mixture of Marxism and structuralism now in fashion will be among the most puzzlingofourideastoevaluate.Aliteral “archeology of knowledge” (the title of one of Foucault’s earlier books) will be required to sort out the valuable from the obvious rubbish. I suspect that in this exercise the iconographers of the present (like Barthes) will fare less well than those who have read the past. Of such “historians” (a description which does not really cover his method) Foucault is the most dazzlingly creative. Discipline and Punish (which, shamefully, has taken over two years to be translated into English) follows Madness and Civilization (1961) and The Birth of the Clinic (1971) as the next stage in Foucault’s massive project of tracing the genealogy of control institutions (asylums, teaching hospitals, prisons) and the human sciences symbiotically linked with them (psychiatry, clinical medicine, criminology, penology). His concern throughout is the relationship between power and knowledge, the articulation of each on the other. Here (as he makes explicit in an interview recently published in the English journal, Radical Philosophy) he opposes the humanist position that, once we gain power, we cease to know——it makes us blind—— and that only those who keep their distance from power, who are no way implicated in tyranny, can attain the truth. For Foucault, such forms of knowledge as psychiatry and criminology (with its “garrulous discourses” and “intermidable [sic] repetitions”) are directly related to the exercise of power. Power itself creates new objects of knowledge and accumulates new bodies of information. Thus to “liberate scientific research from the demands of monopoly capitalism” can only be a slogan. Placing such programmatic Big Issues on one side, though, a superficial first reading of the book mightstartatthelevelofitssubtitle, “The Birth of the Prison.” The key historical transition——at the end of the eighteenth century——is from punishment as torture, a public spectacle, to the more economically and politically discreet prison sentence. The body as the major target of penal repression disappears: within a few decades, the grisly spectacles of torture, dismemberment, exposure, amputation, and branding are over. Interest is transferred from the body to the mind; a coercive, solitary, and secret mode of punishment replaces one that was representative, scenic, and collective. Gone is the liturgy of torture and execution, where the triumph of the sovereign was symbolized in the processions, halts at crossroads, public readings of the sentence even after death, where the criminal’s corpse was exhibited or burnt. In its place comes a whole technology of subtle power. When punishment leaves the domain of more or less everyday perception and enters into abstract consciousness, it does not become less effective. But its effectiveness arises from its inevitability not its horrific theatrical intensity. The new power is not to punish less but to In Retrospect: 1978 29

1,537 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The literature as exploration is universally compatible with any devices to read and is available in the authors' digital library an online access to it is set as public so you can download it instantly.
Abstract: Thank you for downloading literature as exploration. Maybe you have knowledge that, people have look hundreds times for their chosen readings like this literature as exploration, but end up in infectious downloads. Rather than enjoying a good book with a cup of tea in the afternoon, instead they are facing with some infectious bugs inside their laptop. literature as exploration is available in our digital library an online access to it is set as public so you can download it instantly. Our books collection saves in multiple locations, allowing you to get the most less latency time to download any of our books like this one. Merely said, the literature as exploration is universally compatible with any devices to read.

221 citations