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Franklin George Riley

Bio: Franklin George Riley is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Construction management & Grounded theory. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 25 citations.

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Dissertation
01 Jun 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, cultural historical activity theory, underpinned by critical realism and supported by repertory grid technique and constant comparative method, is used to interpret data from two local authority case studies to address the following questions: what is the information behaviour of project teams involved in local government construction projects at concept stage?
Abstract: This research seeks to understand how teams involved in large complex construction projects share and use information. The context of the research is project team information behaviour within early stage UK local government projects. Project tasks are commonly undertaken in a collaborative manner, modified by situational factors which give rise to informational activities which are recognised as information behaviour. However, there is limited research on collaborative information behaviour, especially focussed on activity in the complex and politically driven environment found within local government. Furthermore, information behaviour at the concept stage may be strategic as it will help to determine major decisions that may have considerable implications (e.g. financial or political), it has long term consequences and it affects the information behaviour of others through the leveraging of power and influence. Cultural historical activity theory, underpinned by critical realism and supported by repertory grid technique and constant comparative method, is used to interpret data from two local authority case studies to address the following questions: ‘What is the information behaviour of project teams involved in local government construction projects at concept stage?’ and ‘What contradictions and congruencies influence the intervening variables that shape information behaviour within the project teams of local government construction projects?’ Contradictions within the project activity system, in particular between the socio-political and the technical domains, cause dysfunctionality. Established project information structures cannot readily cope with this dysfunctionality and, as a result, information behaviour, hidden and overt, creates new structures and shapes micro-political activity not anticipated by project method. As such, the research uncovered significant tensions within the teams’ work activity which caused ambiguity, leading to the creation of ‘information spheres’, where information can be exchanged and nurtured - sheltered from political interventions and to project teams which are invisible to the project board. Where these tensions are not present, information exchange is enabled by value alignment and trust leading to big rooms and extended project teams, where authority is distributed to enable improvements to information exchange. The research also posits a model of project team information behaviour and seeks to make modest contributions to both the information behaviour and project management canon.

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This approach contrasts with the expected project management and information norms, rules and behavior, however, provides a language that can be used to explain the phenomena of bounded information spaces which complement and may be used as a development of adjunct to small world's theory.
Abstract: This paper explores collaborative information behavior in the context of highly politicized decision making. It draws upon a qualitative case study of project management of a contentious public sector infrastructure project. We noted the creation of spaces for the development and exchange of information by experts and conceptualize these as information spheres. We postulate that these were formed to bypass power‐induced information behavior that excludes expert power, such as information avoidance. This approach contrasts with the expected project management and information norms, rules and behavior, however, provides a language that can be used to explain the phenomena of bounded information spaces which complement and may be used as a development of adjunct to small world's theory.

3 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Reading a book as this basics of qualitative research grounded theory procedures and techniques and other references can enrich your life quality.

13,415 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the 1966 paperback edition of a publication which first appeared in 1963 has by now been widely reviewed as a worthy contribution to the sociological study of deviant behavior as discussed by the authors, and the authors developed a sequential model of deviance relying on the concept of career, a concept originally developed in studies of occupations.
Abstract: This 1966 paperback edition of a publication which first appeared in 1963 has by now been widely reviewed as a worthy contribution to the sociological study of deviant behavior. Its current appearance as a paperback is a testimonial both to the quality of the work and to the prominence of deviant behavior in this generation. In general the author places deviance in perspective, identifies types of deviant behavior, considers the role of rule makers and enforcers, and some of the problems in studying deviance. In addition, he develops a sequential model of deviance relying on the concept of career, a concept originally developed in studies of occupations. In his study of a particular kind of deviance, the use of marihuana, the author posits and tests systematically an hypothesis about the genesis of marihuana use for pleasure. The hypothesis traces the sequence of changes in individual attitude

2,650 citations

Journal Article

1,501 citations