scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Franklin H. Littell

Other affiliations: Chicago Theological Seminary
Bio: Franklin H. Littell is an academic researcher from Temple University. The author has contributed to research in topics: The Holocaust & German. The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 26 publications receiving 198 citations. Previous affiliations of Franklin H. Littell include Chicago Theological Seminary.

Papers
More filters

Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a set of criteria that recognize the constructs' conceptual similarities and dissimilarities are proposed as benchmarks for judging the value of existing definitions of spirituality and religiousness.
Abstract: Psychologists' emerging interest in spirituality and religion as well as the relevance of each phenomenon to issues of psychological importance requires an understanding of the fundamental characteristics of each construct. On the basis of both historical considerations and a limited but growing empirical literature, we caution against viewing spirituality and religiousness as incompatible and suggest that the common tendency to polarize the terms simply as individual vs. institutional or ′good′ vs. ′bad′ is not fruitful for future research. Also cautioning against the use of restrictive, narrow definitions or overly broad definitions that can rob either construct of its distinctive characteristics, we propose a set of criteria that recognizes the constructs' conceptual similarities and dissimilarities. Rather than trying to force new and likely unsuccessful definitions, we offer these criteria as benchmarks for judging the value of existing definitions.

1,459 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The self-knowledge workshop as discussed by the authors is an educational technique and a possible method f o r reducing p r e j u d i c e. Harvard U n i v e r s i t y. Unpublished study.
Abstract: Jones, R. M. The self-knowledge workshop; an educational technique and a possible method f o r reducing p r e j u d i c e . Harvard U n i v e r s i t y . Unpublished study. Omwake, Katharine T. The r e l a t i o n between acceptance of s e l f and acceptance of others shown by three p e r s o n a l i t y i n v e n t o r i e s , Journal of Consulting Psychology, 1954, 18, 443-446. Rokeach, M. and Fruchter, B. A f a c t o r i a l study of dogmatism and r e l a t e d concepts, Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1956, 53, 356-360. Scher, S. Some group a t t i t u d e s r e l a t e d to expressed acceptance of s e l f and others. U n i v e r s i t y of Houston, D i s s e r t a t i o n A b s t r a c t s , 1955, 15, 2579. Sheerer, E l i z a b e t h . An anal y s i s of the r e l a t i o n s h i p between acceptance of and respect f o r the s e l f and acceptance of and respect f o r others i n ten counseling cases, Journal of Consulting Psychology, 1949, 13, 169-175. S t r e i t f e l d , J. W. Expressed acceptance of s e l f and others by psychotherapists, Journal of Consulting Psychology, 1959, 23 (5) .

1,360 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The strength of strict churches is neither a historical coicidence nor a statiscal artifact as discussed by the authors, but rather a natural phenomenon that makes organizations stronger an more attractive because it reduces free riding.
Abstract: The strength of strict churches is neither a historical coicidence nor a statiscal artifact. Strictness makes organizations stronger an more attractive because it reduces free riding. It screens ou...

1,039 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors advocate an alternative, supply-side approach that emphasizes the opportunities and restrictions confronting religious organizations and their leaders, concluding that supply shifts lie at the root of major religious changes in America.
Abstract: Traditional scholarship approaches religious history from the demand side, attributing developments to the shifting desires, perceptions, and circumstances of religious consumers. This article advocates an alternative, supply-side approach that emphasizes the opportunities and restrictions confronting religious organizations and their leaders. Supply shifts lie at the root of major religious changes in America. Colonial revivalists, Asian cult leaders, and contemporary televangelists all prospered when regulatory changes gave them freer access to America's religious marketplace. The article concludes with a discussion of recent judicial decisions that threaten to restrict the future supply of religious innovation in America.

255 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argues that claims to have definitively refuted secularization theory are exaggerated and mounts a defense of neosecularization paradigm which retains the core insights of the old paradigm while incorporating criticisms leveled against the hubris and laziness of some deployments of the concept of secularization.
Abstract: According to its critics, the old secularization paradigm has been tried, convicted, and executed by recent scholarship in the social sciences of religion, and is being replaced by a new (poatsecularizafion) paradigm which highlights the continued vitality of religion in modern societies. This paper argues that claims to have definitively refuted secularization theory are exaggerated. It mounts a defense of neosecularization paradigm which retains the core insights of the old paradigm while incorporating criticisms leveled against the hubris and laziness of some deployments of the concept of secularization. Following Chaves (1994), this paper argues that the core of neosecularization theory is the proposition that secularization means not the decline of religion but the declining scope of religious authority at the individual, organizational, and societal levels of analysis. Three exemplars of this perspective in the area of religion and politics are highlighted: the work of Hertzke (1988), Demerath and Williams (1992), and Casanova (1994).

209 citations