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Franklin Lewis

Bio: Franklin Lewis is an academic researcher from University of Chicago. The author has contributed to research in topics: Religious conversion & Zoroastrianism. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 3 publications receiving 19 citations.

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TL;DR: The special issue of the journal of Iranian Studies as discussed by the authors takes its theme from Ferdowsi's Shahnameh seen as a work of world literature, a term (Weltliteratur) which has earlier exponents.
Abstract: This special issue of the journal of Iranian Studies takes its theme from Ferdowsi's Shahnameh 1 seen as a work of world literature—a term (Weltliteratur) which, though it has earlier exponents,2 h...

16 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors explored tales and tropes of conversion, especially conversion engendered by romantic attraction for the religious other, in the poetry of Faríd al-Dīn ‘Attār.
Abstract: This article explores tales and tropes of conversion, especially conversion engendered by romantic attraction for the religious other, in the poetry of Farīd al-Dīn ‘Attār. The plot dynamics of class, gender and confessional adherence are complex, and hold important clues to the poet's theology. One particularly rich example of the encoding of religious and social boundaries can be found in a body of ghazals written about the beautiful Christian boy (tarsā-bachcha). The history of this homoerotic sub-genre is traced, and ‘Attār's treatment of the theme is explored in juxtaposition not only to earlier authors, but to other motifs of the religious other and of religious conversion, appearing in his own oeuvre, including the narrative of Shaykh San‘ān with its representation of the Christian girl beloved. The terminology of Christianity and the markers by which ‘Attār construes Christian-ness are discussed, and these symbolically amorous encounters with Christianity are analyzed as part of a larger discourse...

8 citations


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55 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, Long and Dillon present a collection of essays about Ptolemy's On the Kriterion and Hegemonikon that resulted from the joint Liverpool/Manchester seminar of 1980/81.
Abstract: the subjective conviction which can convert true belief into knowledge, and bring to conclusions the self-evidence of premisses. The Epicureans are represented by David Sedley on the 'Common Sensibles'. The chief interest of this essay is the airing given to P.Herc. 19/698, probably from Philodemus. Sight and touch are the most powerful senses, their objects are shape and size, but the reports on these objects by vision are analogous to rather than identical with those of the body as reported by touch. This affords welcome support to the Epicurean dictum that 'All sensations are true'. On the Stoic side, Ian Kidd investigates 'certain other of the older Stoics' (DL 7.54) who accept opdos Ao'yo? as a criterion of truth. A subtle analysis of the sources and context of the passage testifies to a piece of Posidonian apologetics, a contribution to the post-Chrysippean debate with the sceptics on KaraX-qi^is. In effect (caraAiji/n? becomes knowledge through opdos Xoyos. The score of the volume is the text, translation and commentary of Ptolemy, On the Kriterion and Hegemonikon that resulted from the joint Liverpool/Manchester seminar of 1980/81. Tony Long provides an introductory chapter to the piece as an 'epistemology for the working scientist' with useful background material on Ptolemy's sympathies with both Antiochus (of Ascalon) and Galen in finding a general philosophical consensus on epistemology as another move against the sceptics. (The papers edited in 1988 by Long and Dillon on The Questions of Eclecticism, which complements the present volume, also include this essay.) Bob Sharpies elucidates the complex table appended to Ptolemy's Ilepl Kpn-qpiov, and then gives an informative survey of the positions of Philo Judaeus, Alcinous and Alexander of Aphrodisias on the criterion to show the continuity in the first two centuries A.D. between the last followers of the Hellenistic schools and the emerging Neoplatonists. The final essay is devoted to Plotinus even though, as Henry Blumenthal shows, for him 'the real criterion of truth is the truth itself. But Proclus acts as an intermediary in his close association of truth with both intellect and what is intelligible, so that it comes to be necessarily involved in every act of cognition. Unlike many essay collections, this whole volume has a unity of theme and purpose. It is packed with interest for all epistemologists, beautifully produced and a fitting tribute to a working life characterised by enthusiastic scholarship and kindly good humour.

40 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Yamamoto and Yamamoto discuss how oral tradition inter-connects with Middle Eastern literature and present a Brill Studies in Middle Eastern Literatures (BSIL).
Abstract: KUMIKO YAMAMOTO Brill Studies in Middle Eastern Literatures, 26. Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2003. xxiv + 191 pp. ISBN 90 04 12587 6 The central argument of this book concerns how oral tradition intera...

16 citations