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G. A. Mauser

Bio: G. A. Mauser is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Legislation & Poison control. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 1 citations.

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Journal Article
TL;DR: The authors examines the organizational problems of the firearms program and evaluates its effectiveness in improving public safety, concluding that the most appropriate way to evaluate public safety are general measures, such as homicide, suicide, or violent crime rates, not gun deaths or gun crime.
Abstract: In 1995 Canada amended its firearms law to require owner licenses and to create a universal firearm registry. Despite costing at least C$ 1 billion so far, the firearms program has failed to win the trust of the public or the police. This article examines the organizational problems of the firearms program and evaluates its effectiveness in improving public safety. Years after its inception, with virtually unlimited budgets, the firearms registry remains significantly incomplete and contains an unacceptably high number of errors. The most appropriate ways to evaluate public safety are general measures, such as homicide, suicide, or violent crime rates, not gun deaths or gun crime. There is no discernible impact on public safety by the firearm program. It is recommended that efforts be focused on more serious threats to public safety, such as terrorists or violent criminals, not normal citizens who own firearms.

1 citations


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TL;DR: In this article, the authors look to the founding fragment analytical tradition in search of an explanation for America's unique relationship with guns, reviewing key aspects of gun control policy and gun-related culture in the USA and four other Anglo-American societies: Australia, Canada, England, and New Zealand.
Abstract: This article looks to the founding fragment analytical tradition in search of an explanation for America's unique relationship with guns, reviewing key aspects of gun control policy and gun-related culture in the USA and four other Anglo-American societies: Australia, Canada, England, and New Zealand. The discussion that follows argues that only contributors to the fragment tradition that identify considerable differentiation between the USA and Canada can plausibly explain the former's relationship with guns. Finally, the conclusion argues that it was the American Revolution's amplification of the effects of ideological fragmentation from Europe that best explains the American gun exception.

16 citations