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G. Edward White

Bio: G. Edward White is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 34 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Remington, Wister, and Wister as mentioned in this paper described the formation of an Eastern Establishment and the Western Experience, 1835-1885, and the Rough Riders: Regiment of True Americans.
Abstract: Preface Preface to the Paperback Edition Introduction Part I: The East 1. The Formation of an Eastern Establishment 2. Easterners and the Western Experience, 1835-1885 3. Remington, Roosevelt, Wister: The East and Adolescence Part II: The West 4. Roosevelt's West: The Beat of Hardy Life 5. Remington's West: Men with the Bark On 6. Wister's West: The Cowboy as Cultural Hero Part III: East and West in the Decade of Consensus 7. The Rough Riders: Regiment of True Americans 8. Technocracy and Arcadia: Conservation under Roosevelt 9. Remington, Roosevelt, Wister: Consensus and the West References Index

35 citations


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01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In the early 1960s, the John Birch Society, a staunchly anticommunist organization founded in 1958 by retired businessman Robert H.W. Welch, became a hotbed of anti-communism in Southern California as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: OF DISSERTATION SAVE OUR REPUBLIC: BATTLING JOHN BIRCH IN CALIFORNIA’S CONSERVATIVE CRADLE Previous accounts of the development of the New American Right have demonstrated the popularity and resonance of the ideology in Southern California. However, these studies have not shown how contention surrounded conservatism’s ascendancy even in regions where it found eager disciples. “Save Our Republic” uses one conservative Southern California community as a vehicle to better understand the foundations of a wider movement and argues the growth of conservatism was not nearly as smooth as earlier studies have suggested. Santa Barbara, California, experienced a much more contentious introduction to the same conservative elements and exemplifies the larger ideological clash that occurred nationwide during the late 1950s and early 1960s between “establishment,” moderate Republicans and the party’s right flank. In California’s cradle of conservatism, the ideology’s birth was not an easy one. Santa Barbara should have provided a bonanza of support for the John Birch Society, a staunchly anticommunist organization founded in 1958 by retired businessman Robert H.W. Welch. Instead, its presence there in the early 1960s divided the city and inspired the sort of suspicion that ultimately hobbled the group’s reputation nationally. Rather than thriving in the city, the JBS impaled itself in a series of self-inflicted wounds that only worsened the effect these characterizations had on the group’s national reputation. Disseminated to a nationwide audience by local newspaper publisher Thomas M. Storke, who declared his intention to banish the organization from the city, the events that occurred in Santa Barbara throughout 1961 alerted other cities of the potential disruption the JBS could inspire in their communities. The JBS would forever bear the battle scars it earned in Santa Barbara. “Save Our Republic” argues the events in Santa Barbara exemplify the more pronounced political battle that was occurring throughout the nation in the 1960s as conservatives grappled to determine the bounds of their ideology. The threat from the right that caused so much handwringing in the halls of conservative power had an equally unsettling effect in the city’s parlors, churches, schoolhouses and newsrooms.

84 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the relative importance of material and ideal factors for social action in philosophy and social theory has been discussed, and the importance of idealism in both actor-oriented (that is, phenomenologist, ethnomethodologist, symbolic interactionist) and structure-oriented theorists has been examined.
Abstract: Perhaps the most vexing problem in philosophy and social theory concerns the relative importance of material and ideal factors for social action. Karl Marx, for instance, with his notion of base and superstructure and his materialistic interpretation of the dialectic process, made a clean break from the idealism of his Hegelian heritage (McLellan 1977:390; Swingewood 1991:62–63). Nevertheless, idealism proved resilient and later came to inform the thinking of both actor-oriented (that is, phenomenologist, ethnomethodologist, symbolic interactionist) and structure-oriented (that is Functionalist, Structuralist) theorists.

65 citations

01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: This article studied the responses to the world premiere of Puccini's La fanciulla del West (10 December 1910, Metropolitan Opera House, New York City) and found that the early 20th century concern over the development of an American musical identity motivated much of the negative criticism about La fanculla del west, while cosmopolitanism drove much of positive criticism.
Abstract: This dissertation maps the responses to the world premiere of Puccini’s La fanciulla del West (10 December 1910, Metropolitan Opera House, New York City) It seeks to arrive at a deeper understanding of the opera’s ambivalent reception in the New York City musical press From the vantage point of national musical identity, it analyzes the argumentation of the reviews and articles in the New York City newspapers from 1905-1911 and determines the themes and patterns that connect them It then places the critical commentary into the larger contexts of both the New York City opera field of 1910 and the discourse of the American Frontier Myth Critics carefully negotiated conflicting views of personal, national, and musical identities in their assessments of this work The early twentieth-century concern over the development of an American musical identity motivates much of the negative criticism about La fanciulla del West, while cosmopolitanism drives much of the positive criticism The reviews offer a window into nativism and cosmopolitan nationalism in New York City musical life during the first decade of the twentieth century

43 citations

Book ChapterDOI
31 Dec 2019
TL;DR: Turner as mentioned in this paper was the most eminent historian of his generation, who delivered an academic paper at the historical congress convened in conjunction with the Columbian Exposition, which celebrated the four hundredth anniversary of Columbus's arrival in the Western Hemisphere.
Abstract: Americans have never had much use for history, but we do like anniversaries. In 1893 Frederick Jackson Turner, who would become the most eminent historian of his generation, was in Chicago to deliver an academic paper at the historical congress convened in conjunction with the Columbian Exposition. The occasion for the exposition was a slightly belated celebration of the four hundredth anniversary of Columbus's arrival in the Western Hemisphere. The paper Turner presented was "The Significance of the Frontier in American History." 1

34 citations