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Author

G Street

Bio: G Street is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Economic rent & Private sector. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 50 citations.

Papers
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01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a theoretical analysis of the limits and flaws of compensation payments for expropriated assets, and argue that resources are available for supplementing compensation with financial investments for resettlers' development.
Abstract: Many public and private sector projects, such as hydropower dams or mines, trigger forced population displacement but fail to resettle people sustainably and instead cause their impoverishment Social science research has found that one root cause of such failures and of impoverishment is asset dispossession and the insufficient financing of resettlement Most governments, however, state that (1) compensation alone is sufficient for restoring the income and livelihood of those displaced, and (2) resources to supplement compensation with additional financing are not available The author critiques and rejects these positions He offers a theoretical analysis of the limits and flaws of compensation payments for expropriated assets, and argues that resources are available for supplementing compensation with financial investments for resettlers’ development The sources for supplementary financing are the economic rent (windfall profits) generated by natural resource projects such as hydropower or mining and the regular stream of benefits generated by all projects that require resettlement Further, the author argues that financial investments in resettlers’ welfare are indispensable and that benefit sharing is feasible Therefore, both should become basic principles of resettlement legislation and practice In addition to theoretical analysis, the author documents with empirical evidence that some countries (China, Brazil, Canada, Columbia and Japan) already make investments additional to compensation for post-displacement reconstruction The author sums up his argument in these key points: (1)Compensation alone cannot prevent the impoverishment of resettlers and cannot in itself restore and improve their livelihoods; (2)Additional financing is needed for direct investments in resettlement with development; (3)Compensation levels must be increased; (4)Financing resources are available in most cases for investing in resettlers’ development, but allocation of investments depends on the political will of governments and project owners; (5)Firm opposition to displacement and under-compensation is growing in many countries and the strength of resettlers’ demands and political opposition does influence allocation levels; (6)Mechanisms for benefit sharing and transfer are known and effective and these mechanisms can be adjusted to different country and economic sector conditions; (7)The introduction of benefit-sharing rules requires legislative enactment for robust application

60 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: While the World Bank safeguard policies and International Finance Corporation Performance Standards specify the requirements to be observed when project-induced displacement and resettlement occurs, in this paper, the requirements are not specified.
Abstract: While the World Bank safeguard policies and International Finance Corporation Performance Standards specify the requirements to be observed when project-induced displacement and resettlement occurs...

179 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A well-annotated bibliography of publications on development-induced displacement and resettlement (DIDR) can be found in this paper, where the authors present a survey of the literature.
Abstract: A well-annotated bibliography of publications on development-induced displacement and resettlement (DIDR).

54 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors evaluate four dimensions that are part of an energy security framework: availability, affordability, efficiency, and stewardship, and explore some of the governance challenges that arise in managing such a "mega-project".
Abstract: In May 2013 the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) announced that construction of the world’s largest hydroelectric project will begin in October 2015. Upon completion, according to the DRC, the project will bring electricity to half the African continent. With funding from South Africa, the World Bank, the African Development Bank, and others, the U.S.$80 billion Grand Inga Hydroelectric project will construct a 44,000 megawatt (MW) dam anchored to a new transmission network able to distribute electricity to all four of sub-Saharan Africa’s regional electricity power pools. While the dam promises to bring electricity to many millions of Africans who currently lack access, the project also poses risks to the citizens and environment of the DRC. To assess the complex tradeoffs, this article evaluates four dimensions that are part of an energy security framework: availability, affordability, efficiency, and stewardship. In doing so, it explores some of the governance challenges that arise in managing such a “mega-project.” The analysis also reveals tensions between national and regional energy security. It presents evidence that, under certain assumptions, the pursuit of enhanced security at the regional level may result in a net security loss for the DRC. Finally, the article provides suggestions for enhancing the decision-making process of those designing related national and regional energy strategies.

46 citations

01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors reviewed land acquisition techniques adopted across a variety of other countries and viewed land acquisition practices through a framework of principles, processes, and compensation mechanisms to position the Indian experience within the international context.
Abstract: One of the key challenges in the development of infrastructure in India is the acquisition of land necessary for the projects. Land acquisition techniques adopted across a variety of other countries are reviewed in this paper. Although no single “best practice” exists, viewing land acquisition practices through a framework of principles, processes, and compensation mechanisms allows us to position the Indian experience within the international context.

34 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examined the natural and social capital of Bo Hon villagers in central Vietnam, before and after resettlement within Binh Thanh commune due to the building of Binh Dien Hydroelectric dam on the Huu Trach River.
Abstract: The study examined the natural and social capital of Bo Hon villagers in central Vietnam, before and after resettlement within Binh Thanh commune due to the building of Binh Dien Hydroelectric dam on the Huu Trach River. (1) Background: The two-fold aim was to develop solutions to the impacts of resettlement on natural and social capital, and strategies for timely intervention and new livelihoods after households were resettled. (2) Methods: Livelihood survey of all 46 households was conducted in 2010, and villagers were asked about 2004, before resettlement, and about 2009, when the occupants of Bo Hon village had been moved to a new location 15 km away from the original one. The research employed mixed-methods by using household surveys, focus group discussions, and key informant interviews. The impacts of displacement and resettlement on production activities and daily life of rural people were examined in the following areas: (i) land resource; (ii) access to common-pool natural resources; (iii) income structure; (iv) agriculturally based livelihoods; (v) material assets; (vi) customary practices; and (vii) social relationships. (3) Results: The most significant impact was on the type of production activities that could be conducted after resettlement and reduction in land area to grow profitable commodities such as Lồ O Bamboo. Specifically, land for growing rice and other crops were significantly affected with the land area substantially reduced or flooded. Also harvesting of common pool resources from the forest (NTFPs) were reduced such as honey and rattan, and only 25% of the villagers continued to fish in the river. (4) Conclusions: Strategies were put in place to reduce the level of disruption to the villagers’ livelihoods, but some parts of the compensation package were short-lived or inequitably distributed (e.g., land), while infrastructure developments such as sealed roads have made the village far more accessible to Hue City some 25 km away.

32 citations