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G W Rowe

Bio: G W Rowe is an academic researcher from University of Birmingham. The author has contributed to research in topics: Deformation (meteorology) & Chip formation. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 67 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a review of the three major aspects of metal machining: the physical characteristics of chip formation, the properties and operating conditions of cutting tools, and the condition of the final product.
Abstract: This review considers the three major aspects of metal machining: the physical characteristics of chip formation, the properties and operating conditions of cutting tools, and the condition of the final product. There is a brief account of specialized metal-removal techniques and numerical and computer control of modern lathes and milling machines. The contributions of applied physics to metal cutting are emphasized throughout. The dependence of chip formation on the deformation and fracture behaviour of the workpiece and the friction conditions between chip and tool are described. Because of these extreme conditions the choice of tool materials is very restricted.

70 citations


Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: In this article, the role of heat in limiting the rate of metal removal when cutting the higher melting point metals is discussed. But, as pointed out, there is no direct relationship between cutting forces or power consumption and the temperature near the cutting edge, and the most important heat source responsible for raising the temperature of a tool is the flow-zone where the chip is seized to the rake face of the tool.
Abstract: Publisher Summary This chapter focuses on the role of heat in limiting the rate of metal removal when cutting the higher melting point metals. The power consumed in metal cutting is largely converted into heat near the cutting edge of the tool, and many of the economic and technical problems of machining are caused directly or indirectly by this heating action. The bulk of cutting, however, is carried out on steel and cast iron, and it is in the cutting of these, together with the nickel-based alloys, that the most serious technical and economic problems occur. With these higher melting point metals and alloys, the tools are heated to high temperatures as metal removal rate increases and, above certain critical speeds, the tools tend to collapse after a very short cutting time under the influence of stress and temperature. It is, therefore, important to understand the factors, which influence the generation of heat. The most important heat source responsible for raising the temperature of the tool is the flow-zone where the chip is seized to the rake face of the tool. The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of the very thin flow-zone is a small fraction of the total energy expended in cutting, and the volume of metal heated in the flow-zone may vary considerably. Therefore, there is no direct relationship between cutting forces or power consumption and the temperature near the cutting edge.

259 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The mechanisms of steel fractures during different mechanical machining operations and the behavior of various non-metallic inclusions in a cutting zone are reviewed and the effects of composition, size, number and morphology of inclusions on machinability factors are discussed and summarized.
Abstract: Considerable research has been conducted over recent decades on the role of non‑metallic inclusions and their link to the machinability of different steels. The present work reviews the mechanisms of steel fractures during different mechanical machining operations and the behavior of various non-metallic inclusions in a cutting zone. More specifically, the effects of composition, size, number and morphology of inclusions on machinability factors (such as cutting tool wear, power consumption, etc.) are discussed and summarized. Finally, some methods for modification of non-metallic inclusions in the liquid steel are considered to obtain a desired balance between mechanical properties and machinability of various steel grades.

150 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1977-Wear
TL;DR: In this paper, it is suggested that processes of molecular transport within a network of interfacial capillaries are dominant in controlling the effectiveness of cutting fluids provided they are capable of reaction with, or adsorption by, the metal surfaces.

136 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a micro-machining process that involves making cuts in a soft material using a sharp, lubricated tool to create closely spaced negative cavities of a desired shape is presented.
Abstract: Directional dry adhesives are inspired by animals such as geckos and are a particularly useful technology for climbing applications. Previously, they have generally been manufactured using photolithographic processes. This paper presents a micro-machining process that involves making cuts in a soft material using a sharp, lubricated tool to create closely spaced negative cavities of a desired shape. The machined material becomes a mold into which an elastomer is cast to create the directional adhesive. The trajectory of the tool can be varied to avoid plastic flow of the mold material that may adversely affect adjacent cavities. The relationship between tool trajectory and resulting cavity shape is established through modeling and process characterization experiments. This micro-machining process is much less expensive than previous photolithographic processes used to create similar features and allows greater flexibility with respect to the micro-scale feature geometry, mold size, and mold material. The micro-machining process produces controllable, directional adhesives, where the normal adhesion increases with shear loading in a preferred direction. This is verified by multi-axis force testing on a flat glass substrate. Upon application of a post-treatment to decrease the roughness of the engaging surfaces of the features after casting, the adhesives significantly outperform comparable directional adhesives made from a photolithographic mold.

95 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
12 Jun 1979
TL;DR: In this paper, a transparent sapphire cutting tool is used to study the frictional interactions occurring at the chip-tool interface. But, although there is intimate contact between the chip and the tool in the immediate vicinity of the cutting edge, there is relative movement at chip and tool interface with little or no adhesive transfer of chip material in this region.
Abstract: A transparent sapphire cutting tool is used to study directly the frictional interactions occurring at the chip–tool interface. The investigation deals with the orthogonal cutting of single phase, face-centred cubic materials, in air and in vacuum. The investigation brings out two points of importance. First, although there is intimate contact between the chip and the tool in the immediate vicinity of the cutting edge, there is relative movement at the chip–tool interface with little or no adhesive transfer of chip material in this region. Secondly, in each of the systems examined it was found that oxygen increased the cutting forces. This increase was associated with the gross transfer of chip material onto the cutting tool at some distance away from the cutting edge.

93 citations