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Gareth J. Davies

Bio: Gareth J. Davies is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Reflective practice & Professional writing. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 3 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that expressive writing enables the creative practitioner to engage with their practice in insightful ways that integrate theoretical insights and help to reveal the elusive obvious, which in turn gives life to what is being explored.
Abstract: This article draws on the idea of the elusive obvious as a useful way of examining how creative arts practitioners can make sense of their practice through expressive writing. Defining the elusive obvious as that ethereal aspect of creative arts practice that is often palpable to the practitioner but equally hard to pin down within the creative process, the article argues that expressive writing enables the creative practitioner to engage with their practice in insightful ways that integrate theoretical insights and help to reveal the elusive obvious, which in turn gives life to what is being explored. It examines ways in which expressive writing could be used to facilitate practitioners' experience of their creative practice and facilitate a better appreciation of the interconnectedness of practice (doing) and theory (critical reflection and analysis) in the creative arts. The article draws on discussions on practice as research to highlight the distinction between 'writing out' and 'writing up'; where 'writing out' calls attention to the idea of 'searching' within the creative process, while 'writing up' is firmly located in the recording and documentation phase of that practice. It argues that it is within this process of 'writing out' - of searching - that the elusive obvious can be revealed. The article also illustrates how reflective practice/writing can be understood through drama. It examines how reflective practice/writing can often lead to 'eureka' moments when, by personalizing their practice within the creative working environment, practitioners suddenly discover the elusive obvious. Through the ideas explored in this article, we invite a consideration of how expressive writing can act as a vehicle through which meaning could be found. This article argues, therefore, that expressive writing is not an end in itself, but is exploratory and transient in nature, and a rich terrain for the elusive obvious to be revealed.

5 citations


Cited by
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DissertationDOI
31 May 2016
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a practice-centred teaching method for collaborative writing for design teams at M-level in higher education (HE) by using Approaches, Practices and Tools (APTs) across three case study workshops.
Abstract: This thesis offers and evaluates collaborative writing practices for teams of Design students at M-Level in Higher Education (HE). The research begins by asking why writing is included in current art and design HE, and identifies an assumption about the role of writing across the sector derived from a misreading of the 1960 and 1970 Coldstream Reports. As a result, drawing on recommendations that were made in the Reports for non-studio studies to be complementary to art and design practice in HE, I focus on how teams of design students can complement their design skills with collaborative writing. Some studies for addressing how design students learn from writing in HE already exist, but none have established a practice-centred teaching method for collaborative writing for design teams at M-level. My research captures the effects of my Approaches, Practices and Tools (APTs) across three case study workshops. I compare these with the most common writing model in HE designed for text-based study in the humanities. My APTs use participants' designerly strengths to redesign how they can use writing to complement their practice. This provides learners with a means of identifying and creating their own situated writing structures and practices. I document how my practice-centred APTs position collaborative writing practices as a designerly mode of communication between design practitioners working in teams. I show it to be more complementary to practice and so more effective in comparison to models imported from the humanities. My explorations are carried out through two thesis sections. Section One is an in-depth literature-based rationale that critically informs my investigations. Section Two presents my methodologies and reports three case studies, in which I explore the emergent data collected through a range of qualitative methods, mapping and evaluative techniques. The findings are of importance to those teaching M-Level design courses.

24 citations

Dissertation
01 Jun 2018
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined their own improvisatory practice on the viola da gamba and its augmentation with mixed-music computer systems, and explored augmenting this practice with systems, looking in detail at my performances with gruntCount by Martin Parker, Laminate by myself and derivations by Ben Carey.
Abstract: This thesis examines my improvisatory practice on the viola da gamba and its augmentation with mixed-music computer systems. It comprises creative work and an extended written commentary and discussion. My creative work is presented in two albums of music – solo viola da gamba improvisation, and viola da gamba and mixed-music computer systems – and supplementary recorded material. The written commentary looks in depth at the presented creative work. I use the first, solo album to examine my improvisatory practice. To explore augmenting this practice with systems, I look in detail at my performances with gruntCount by Martin Parker, Laminate by myself and derivations by Ben Carey. Examples of these performances are presented in the second album. Scrutiny of these three systems leads to extended discussion of the following topics: 1. Taxonomy: What are these systems? What are the characteristics they display? Do these systems fit into a standard classification scheme? 2. Ontology: Do performances with these systems instantiate musical works? What are the criteria that would help us to decide? How much of my practice is therefore underpinned by musical works? 3. Copyright: Who is responsible for the musical output with these systems? Who is a legal/musical author in such performances? To conclude, I compare my improvisatory practice with and without systems and identify learnings arising from this research.

4 citations

DOI
29 Sep 2022-Tempo
TL;DR: In this article , the authors consider the implications of the consideration of epistemic justice within modes of composition pedagogy in higher education and frame the composers themselves as individuals prior to the technical exercises that they may undertake.
Abstract: Abstract This article considers the implications of the consideration of epistemic justice within modes of composition pedagogy in higher education and is in part a manifesto, in part a reflection on my experiences of teaching composition in this setting. I ask how composition education can become, as described in 2015 by the North Macedonian dramatist and creative educator Goran Stefanovski, ‘the politics of the impossible’. I question how composition education could function without a canon of examples or assumed master–apprentice hierarchies and frame this as a question of epistemic justice, one that considers the composers themselves as individuals prior to the technical exercises that they may undertake. I describe why I believe that epistemic justice is a concept that is worthy of consideration in creative education in composition alongside the ways that current models of composition pedagogy might unintentionally cause students to experience epistemic injustice within their education experiences. Rather than a prescriptive model, I propose challenges that I hope can influence my educational approach now and in the future and conclude with some suggestions about what a model of hermeneutic epistemic justice might look like as a pedagogic model for music composition.
Journal ArticleDOI
29 Sep 2022-Tempo
TL;DR: In this article , the authors consider the implications of the consideration of epistemic justice within modes of composition pedagogy in higher education and frame the composers themselves as individuals prior to the technical exercises that they may undertake.
Abstract: Abstract This article considers the implications of the consideration of epistemic justice within modes of composition pedagogy in higher education and is in part a manifesto, in part a reflection on my experiences of teaching composition in this setting. I ask how composition education can become, as described in 2015 by the North Macedonian dramatist and creative educator Goran Stefanovski, ‘the politics of the impossible’. I question how composition education could function without a canon of examples or assumed master–apprentice hierarchies and frame this as a question of epistemic justice, one that considers the composers themselves as individuals prior to the technical exercises that they may undertake. I describe why I believe that epistemic justice is a concept that is worthy of consideration in creative education in composition alongside the ways that current models of composition pedagogy might unintentionally cause students to experience epistemic injustice within their education experiences. Rather than a prescriptive model, I propose challenges that I hope can influence my educational approach now and in the future and conclude with some suggestions about what a model of hermeneutic epistemic justice might look like as a pedagogic model for music composition.