scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Geoffrey B. Cockerham

Bio: Geoffrey B. Cockerham is an academic researcher from Utah Valley University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Public health & Health care. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 6 publications receiving 54 citations.

Papers
More filters
01 Jan 2010
TL;DR: The globalization process, the spread of Western medicine, medical tourism, global pandemics, and the global governance of health and disease are described in this article, where the authors define globalization as a process of international networking that affects the health of populations either positively or negatively.
Abstract: Health and disease are connected globally in that diseases now spread rapidly from continent to continent and efforts to contain them operate on a global level; markets for drugs and other health care commodities and the corporations that produce them span the globe; and global processes like pollution, modernization, and technological change impact on local environments. Consequently, globalization is a process of international networking that affects the health of populations either positively or negatively. This entry describes the globalization process, the spread of Western medicine, medical tourism, global pandemics, and the global governance of health and disease. Keywords: globalization; governance; health; international agencies; migration

25 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated regional integration in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) by analyzing the agreements developed within the ASEAN framework since its founding in 1967.
Abstract: This paper investigates regional integration in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) by analyzing the agreements developed within the ASEAN framework since its founding in 1967. This examination reveals that, although integration in ASEAN is certainly influenced by norms and values, the integration process can be best understood by intergovernmentalism. While many agreements have been developed within the ASEAN framework and have become more legalistic in nature, they tend to mostly be in functional areas and exhibit low levels of transparency and delegation. The design of ASEAN is indicative of an overriding concern for state sovereignty as a key strategic interest for member states.

24 citations

Book
01 Apr 1994
TL;DR: The globalization process, the spread of Western medicine, medical tourism, global pandemics, and the global governance of health and disease are described in this article, where the authors define globalization as a process of international networking that affects the health of populations either positively or negatively.
Abstract: Health and disease are connected globally in that diseases now spread rapidly from continent to continent and efforts to contain them operate on a global level; markets for drugs and other health care commodities and the corporations that produce them span the globe; and global processes like pollution, modernization, and technological change impact on local environments. Consequently, globalization is a process of international networking that affects the health of populations either positively or negatively. This entry describes the globalization process, the spread of Western medicine, medical tourism, global pandemics, and the global governance of health and disease. Keywords: globalization; governance; health; international agencies; migration

8 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a measure for dispute settlement authority and some explanation for the delegation aspect of international cooperation by examining why states agree to grant dispute resolution authority to a particular kind of institutional arrangement, conventional international governmental organizations (IGO).
Abstract: The issue of dispute settlement is problematic in the international system because it may conflict with sovereignty. States may find, however, that in order to facilitate cooperation, they should delegate some authority to resolve disputes to a third party. This article seeks to provide a measure for dispute settlement authority and some explanation for the delegation aspect of international cooperation by examining why states agree to grant dispute settlement authority to a particular kind of institutional arrangement, conventional international governmental organizations (IGOs). The analysis reveals that states tend to enter into IGO agreements with a higher degree of dispute settlement authority when members have a greater incentive to defect due either to the large number of other parties to the agreement, or due to greater cooperative demands as provided by the agreement.

1 citations

Reference EntryDOI
21 Feb 2014
TL;DR: The political economy of health is rooted in the development of the concept of political economy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries as discussed by the authors, however, it has only emerged as a research program over the last few decades.
Abstract: The political economy of health is rooted in the development of the concept of political economy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries It has, however, only emerged as a research program over the last few decades Much of this research utilizes a Marxist, class-based approach to explain the quality of health both within countries as well as globally It has tended to focus on political, economic, and psychosocial factors in explaining health outcomes A key contribution of the political economy of health is its emphasis on how these factors affect health This approach goes beyond biology and medicine in researching how national economic policies and public interventions by the state may impact and contribute to the quality of population health Keywords: governance; income distribution; inequality; Marxism; welfare

Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The focus of this special supplement is the framing of global health issues and the manner in which this impacts upon GHG, and how issues can be framed in different ways creating particular pathways of response which in turn affect the potential for and nature of GHG.
Abstract: With the emergence of global health comes governance challenges which are equally global in nature. This article identifies some of the initial limitations in analyses of global health governance (GHG) before discussing the focus of this special supplement: the framing of global health issues and the manner in which this impacts upon GHG. Whilst not denying the importance of material factors (such as resources and institutional competencies), the article identifies how issues can be framed in different ways, thereby creating particular pathways of response which in turn affect the potential for and nature of GHG. It also identifies and discusses the key frames operating in global health: evidence-based medicine, human rights, security, economics and development.

67 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that any adequate treatment of these white spaces compels a significant breaching of the disciplinary norms of organization studies, and propose a distinctive approach to what they claim to be "white spaces" in organization.
Abstract: Contemporary organization is increasingly understood as contingent and improvisational - and immersed in complex and shadowy realities where customary assumptions about the space and time of organization no longer hold. This Special Issue invites organization studies into an ambivalent space of sites/sights in organization, the double-play of this modest conceptual proposal necessary in order to open up the complex folding of the epistemological and the ontological in organization today. In this introduction we seek to establish and position a distinctive approach to what we claim to be ‘white spaces’ in organization. We show that any adequate treatment of these white spaces compels a significant breaching of the disciplinary norms of organization studies. Our argument derives from a consideration of a range of recently emerging concepts and analyses in the study of organization, all of which are suggestive of crisis and of emerging (anti-)forms of organization. This edition of Organization Studies publis...

48 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Cathrine Lau1
TL;DR: The factors that underpin the Thai child sex industry and the lessons and implications that can be drawn for health care and nursing around the world are explored.
Abstract: Child prostitution is an old, global and complex phenomenon, which deprives children of their childhood, human rights and dignity. Child prostitution can be seen as the commercial sexual exploitation of children involving an element of forced labour, and thus can be considered as a contemporary form of slavery. Globally, child prostitution is reported to be a common problem in Central and South America and Asia. Of all the south-east Asian nations, the problem is most prolific in Thailand. In Thailand, there appears to be a long history of child prostitution, and this article explores the factors that underpin the Thai child sex industry and the lessons and implications that can be drawn for health care and nursing around the world.

33 citations

BookDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a contemporary understanding of the limits to growth of the world population is presented, with the goal of having 9-10 billion people be fed Sustainably and Equitably by 2050.
Abstract: 1. Introduction 2. Optimum Population, Welfare Economics, and Inequality 3. Overpopulation or Underpopulation? 4. Demographic and Environmental Transitions 5. Towards a Contemporary Understanding of the Limits to Growth 6. How can 9-10 Billion People be Fed Sustainably and Equitably by 2050? 7. Water Scarcity on a Blue Planet 8. The Metabolism of a Human-Dominated Planet 9. Safe, Effective, and Affordable Health Care for a Bulging Population 10. Sourcing Mineral Resources: Problems and Solutions 11. Governance Matters Most

31 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The 2014 Ebola crisis has highlighted public-health vulnerabilities in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea as discussed by the authors, countries ravaged by extreme poverty, deforestation and mining-related disruption of livelihoods and ecosystems, and bloody civil wars.
Abstract: The 2014 Ebola crisis has highlighted public-health vulnerabilities in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea—countries ravaged by extreme poverty, deforestation and mining-related disruption of livelihoods and ecosystems, and bloody civil wars in the cases of Liberia and Sierra Leone. Ebola’s emergence and impact are grounded in the legacy of colonialism and its creation of enduring inequalities within African nations and globally, via neoliberalism and the Washington Consensus. Recent experiences with new and emerging diseases such as SARS and various strains of HN influenzas have demonstrated the effectiveness of a coordinated local and global public health and education-oriented response to contain epidemics. To what extent is international assistance to fight Ebola strengthening local public health and medical capacity in a sustainable way, so that other emerging disease threats, which are accelerating with climate change, may be met successfully? This chapter considers the wide-ranging socio-political, medical, legal and environmental factors that have contributed to the rapid spread of Ebola, with particular emphasis on the politics of the global and public health response and the role of gender, social inequality, colonialism and racism as they relate to the mobilization and establishment of the public health infrastructure required to combat Ebola and other emerging diseases in times of climate change.

27 citations