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Geoffrey M. Voelker

Bio: Geoffrey M. Voelker is an academic researcher from University of California, San Diego. The author has contributed to research in topics: The Internet & Wireless network. The author has an hindex of 72, co-authored 189 publications receiving 20252 citations. Previous affiliations of Geoffrey M. Voelker include University of California & University of California, Los Angeles.


Papers
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Proceedings Article
13 Aug 2001
TL;DR: This article presents a new technique, called “backscatter analysis,” that provides a conservative estimate of worldwide denial-of-service activity, and believes it is the first to provide quantitative estimates of Internet-wide denial- of- service activity.
Abstract: In this paper, we seek to answer a simple question: "How prevalent are denial-of-service attacks in the Internet today?". Our motivation is to understand quantitatively the nature of the current threat as well as to enable longer-term analyses of trends and recurring patterns of attacks. We present a new technique, called "backscatter analysis", that provides an estimate of worldwide denial-of-service activity. We use this approach on three week-long datasets to assess the number, duration and focus of attacks, and to characterize their behavior. During this period, we observe more than 12,000 attacks against more than 5,000 distinct targets, ranging from well known e-commerce companies such as Amazon and Hotmail to small foreign ISPs and dial-up connections. We believe that our work is the only publically available data quantifying denial-of-service activity in the Internet.

1,444 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
22 Apr 2001
TL;DR: This work develops several placement algorithms that use workload information, such as client latency and request rates, to make informed placement decisions, and evaluates the placement algorithms using both synthetic and real network topologies, as well as Web server traces.
Abstract: There has been an increasing deployment of content distribution networks (CDNs) that offer hosting services to Web content providers. CDNs deploy a set of servers distributed throughout the Internet and replicate provider content across these servers for better performance and availability than centralized provider servers. Existing work on CDNs has primarily focused on techniques for efficiently redirecting user requests to appropriate CDN servers to reduce request latency and balance load. However, little attention has been given to the development of placement strategies for Web server replicas to further improve CDN performance. We explore the problem of Web server replica placement in detail. We develop several placement algorithms that use workload information, such as client latency and request rates, to make informed placement decisions. We then evaluate the placement algorithms using both synthetic and real network topologies, as well as Web server traces, and show that the placement of Web replicas is crucial to CDN performance. We also address a number of practical issues when using these algorithms, such as their sensitivity to imperfect knowledge about client workload and network topology, the stability of the input data, and methods for obtaining the input.

895 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
28 Jun 2009
TL;DR: This paper describes an approach to this problem based on automated URL classification, using statistical methods to discover the tell-tale lexical and host-based properties of malicious Web site URLs.
Abstract: Malicious Web sites are a cornerstone of Internet criminal activities. As a result, there has been broad interest in developing systems to prevent the end user from visiting such sites. In this paper, we describe an approach to this problem based on automated URL classification, using statistical methods to discover the tell-tale lexical and host-based properties of malicious Web site URLs. These methods are able to learn highly predictive models by extracting and automatically analyzing tens of thousands of features potentially indicative of suspicious URLs. The resulting classifiers obtain 95-99% accuracy, detecting large numbers of malicious Web sites from their URLs, with only modest false positives.

806 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
23 Oct 2013
TL;DR: From this analysis, longitudinal changes in the Bitcoin market are characterized, the stresses these changes are placing on the system, and the challenges for those seeking to use Bitcoin for criminal or fraudulent purposes at scale are defined.
Abstract: Bitcoin is a purely online virtual currency, unbacked by either physical commodities or sovereign obligation; instead, it relies on a combination of cryptographic protection and a peer-to-peer protocol for witnessing settlements. Consequently, Bitcoin has the unintuitive property that while the ownership of money is implicitly anonymous, its flow is globally visible. In this paper we explore this unique characteristic further, using heuristic clustering to group Bitcoin wallets based on evidence of shared authority, and then using re-identification attacks (i.e., empirical purchasing of goods and services) to classify the operators of those clusters. From this analysis, we characterize longitudinal changes in the Bitcoin market, the stresses these changes are placing on the system, and the challenges for those seeking to use Bitcoin for criminal or fraudulent purposes at scale.

778 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
09 Jul 2003
TL;DR: The design space of worm containment systems is described using three key parameters - reaction time, containment strategy and deployment scenario - and the lower bounds that any such system must exceed to be useful today are demonstrated.
Abstract: It has been clear since 1988 that self-propagating code can quickly spread across a network by exploiting homogeneous security vulnerabilities. However, the last few years have seen a dramatic increase in the frequency and virulence of such "worm" outbreaks. For example, the Code-Red worm epidemics of 2001 infected hundreds of thousands of Internet hosts in a very short period - incurring enormous operational expense to track down, contain, and repair each infected machine. In response to this threat, there is considerable effort focused on developing technical means for detecting and containing worm infections before they can cause such damage. This paper does not propose a particular technology to address this problem, but instead focuses on a more basic question: How well will any such approach contain a worm epidemic on the Internet? We describe the design space of worm containment systems using three key parameters - reaction time, containment strategy and deployment scenario. Using a combination of analytic modeling and simulation, we describe how each of these design factors impacts the dynamics of a worm epidemic and, conversely, the minimum engineering requirements necessary to contain the spread of a given worm. While our analysis cannot provide definitive guidance for engineering defenses against all future threats, we demonstrate the lower bounds that any such system must exceed to be useful today. Unfortunately, our results suggest that there are significant technological and administrative gaps to be bridged before an effective defense can be provided in today's Internet.

759 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper presents a detailed study on recent advances and open research issues in WMNs, followed by discussing the critical factors influencing protocol design and exploring the state-of-the-art protocols for WMNs.

4,205 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The conclusion is that the blockchain-IoT combination is powerful and can cause significant transformations across several industries, paving the way for new business models and novel, distributed applications.
Abstract: Motivated by the recent explosion of interest around blockchains, we examine whether they make a good fit for the Internet of Things (IoT) sector. Blockchains allow us to have a distributed peer-to-peer network where non-trusting members can interact with each other without a trusted intermediary, in a verifiable manner. We review how this mechanism works and also look into smart contracts—scripts that reside on the blockchain that allow for the automation of multi-step processes. We then move into the IoT domain, and describe how a blockchain-IoT combination: 1) facilitates the sharing of services and resources leading to the creation of a marketplace of services between devices and 2) allows us to automate in a cryptographically verifiable manner several existing, time-consuming workflows. We also point out certain issues that should be considered before the deployment of a blockchain network in an IoT setting: from transactional privacy to the expected value of the digitized assets traded on the network. Wherever applicable, we identify solutions and workarounds. Our conclusion is that the blockchain-IoT combination is powerful and can cause significant transformations across several industries, paving the way for new business models and novel, distributed applications.

3,129 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
25 Jun 2017
TL;DR: An overview of blockchain architechture is provided and some typical consensus algorithms used in different blockchains are compared and possible future trends for blockchain are laid out.
Abstract: Blockchain, the foundation of Bitcoin, has received extensive attentions recently. Blockchain serves as an immutable ledger which allows transactions take place in a decentralized manner. Blockchain-based applications are springing up, covering numerous fields including financial services, reputation system and Internet of Things (IoT), and so on. However, there are still many challenges of blockchain technology such as scalability and security problems waiting to be overcome. This paper presents a comprehensive overview on blockchain technology. We provide an overview of blockchain architechture firstly and compare some typical consensus algorithms used in different blockchains. Furthermore, technical challenges and recent advances are briefly listed. We also lay out possible future trends for blockchain.

2,642 citations

01 Nov 2000
TL;DR: This survey of research on context-aware systems and applications looked in depth at the types of context used and models of context information, at systems that support collecting and disseminating context, and at applications that adapt to the changing context.
Abstract: Context-aware computing is a mobile computing paradigm in which applications can discover and take advantage of contextual information (such as user location, time of day, nearby people and devices, and user activity) Since it was proposed about a decade ago, many researchers have studied this topic and built several context-aware applications to demonstrate the usefulness of this new technology Context-aware applications (or the system infrastructure to support them), however, have never been widely available to everyday users In this survey of research on context-aware systems and applications, we looked in depth at the types of context used and models of context information, at systems that support collecting and disseminating context, and at applications that adapt to the changing context Through this survey, it is clear that context-aware research is an old but rich area for research The difficulties and possible solutions we outline serve as guidance for researchers hoping to make context-aware computing a reality

2,272 citations