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Gerd Bayer

Bio: Gerd Bayer is an academic researcher from University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. The author has contributed to research in topics: Narrative & Aphra. The author has an hindex of 7, co-authored 26 publications receiving 127 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2010-Shofar
TL;DR: The authors argue that some recent Holocaust films introduce a new attitude towards memory that moves beyond the notion of postmemory while remaining committed to the project of remembering the past and creating an ethical response.
Abstract: This essay argues that some recent Holocaust films introduce a new attitude towards memory that moves beyond the notion of postmemory while remaining committed to the project of remembering the past and creating an ethical response. The films by Marceline Loridan-Ivens and Robert Thalheim focus on future generations and their ability to relate to the Holocaust in an ethical way that avoids the problems of traumatization and commodification that mark earlier Holocaust film and commercial cinema, respectively.

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: David Mitchell's Cloud Atlas as discussed by the authors is an example of a novel that does not submit to the linearity of temporal developments, drawing on postcolonialism, environmentalism, and technological disasters.
Abstract: David Mitchell's Cloud Atlas (2004) approaches the tradition of apocalyptic writing from a unique angle in that it refuses to submit to the linearity of temporal developments Drawing on postcolonialism, environmentalism, and technological disasters, Mitchell implies that the kind of apocalypse traditionally envisioned as an event to be encountered in the future is already taking place His novel casts any historical present as fundamentally marked by catastrophic developments

15 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the introduction of Toward a Theory of Minority Discourse, a text that was first published in 1987, the editors state that the study of minority cultures cannot be conducted without at least a relevant knowledge of sociology, political theory, economics, and history; otherwise, the specifics of the struggles embodied in cultural forms remain invisible as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: In the introduction of Toward a Theory of Minority Discourse, a text that was first published in 1987, the editors state that “the study of minority cultures cannot be conducted without at least a relevant knowledge of sociology, political theory, economics, and history; otherwise, the specifics of the struggles embodied in cultural forms remain invisible.”2 Although not specifically directed towards students of minority discourse, but rather towards sociologists, anthropologists, or more generally towards scholars active in the field of cultural studies, these words are nevertheless also relevant for the study of minority literature within a literary discipline. Almost everyone who has read, studied, or taught minority literature will whole-heartedly agree that a reading based exclusively on the text-immanent tradition of New Criticism will most likely result in a very narrow understanding of those texts. It is, of course, true that interpretation and criticism of Migrantenliteratur depend on an awareness of the larger cultural and aesthetic framework in which these texts operate. (This is true for any act of reading.) However, there are various risks involved in an overly enthusiastic turn towards the fields of studies listed by the editors mentioned at the beginning of this essay. It is my aim in this essay to outline some of these risks and to offer an alternative approach for reading texts whose authors are perceived of as not belonging to society’s mainstream, thereby rendering the aesthetic qualities of these texts visible.3 Prior to presenting the main argument of this essay, the term “Migrantenliteratur” merits a brief discussion. After almost two decades of critical attention to German literature written by non-German, or newly-German

14 citations

BookDOI
22 Apr 2016

10 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In some religious traditions, the myth of the ‘Fall from the Garden of Eden’ symbolizes the loss of the primordial state through the veiling of higher consciousness.
Abstract: Human beings are described by many spiritual traditions as ‘blind’ or ‘asleep’ or ‘in a dream.’ These terms refers to the limited attenuated state of consciousness of most human beings caught up in patterns of conditioned thought, feeling and perception, which prevent the development of our latent, higher spiritual possibilities. In the words of Idries Shah: “Man, like a sleepwalker who suddenly ‘comes to’ on some lonely road has in general no correct idea as to his origins or his destiny.” In some religious traditions, such as Christianity and Islam, the myth of the ‘Fall from the Garden of Eden’ symbolizes the loss of the primordial state through the veiling of higher consciousness. Other traditions use similar metaphors to describe the spiritual condition of humanity:

2,223 citations

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1,479 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Chung et al. as discussed by the authors present a history and theory reader of the New Media/Old Media: A History and Theory Reader, focusing on early film history and multi-media.
Abstract: Anderson, Benedict. 1991. Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. London: Verso. Briggs, Asa and Peter Burke. 2005. A Social History of the Media from Gutenberg to the Internet. Cambridge: Polity Press. Chun, Wendy Hui Kyong. 2006. \"Introduction: Did Somebody Say New Media?\" In Wendy Hui Kyong Chun and Thomas Kennan eds., New Media/Old Media: A History and Theory Reader. New York: Routledge, pp. 1-11. Deibert, Ronald. 1997. Parchment, Printing and Hypermedia: Communication in World Order Transformation. New York: Columbia University Press. Elsaesser, Thomas. 2006. \"Early Film History and Multi-Media: An Archaeology of Possible Futures?\" In Wendy Hui Kyong Chun and Thomas Kennan eds., New Media/Old Media: A History and Theory Reader. New York: Routledge, pp. 13-26. Jenkins, Henry. 2006. Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide. New York: New York University Press. Luhman, Niklas. 2000. The Reality of the Mass Media. Cambridge: Polity Press. Mirzoeff, Nicholas. 2006. \"Network Subjects or, The Ghost is the Message.\" In Wendy Hui Kyong Chun and Thomas Keenan eds., New Media/Old Media: A History and Theory Reader. New York: Routledge, pp. 335-345. Saenger, Paul. 1997. \"Introduction\" to Space Between Words: The Origins of Silent Reading. Stanford: Stanford University Press, pp. 1-17. Thorburn, David and Henry Jenkins eds. 2003. Rethinking Media Change: The Aesthetics of Transition. Boston: MIT Press.

1,004 citations

01 Jan 2016

533 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A poetics of postmodernism: History, theory, fiction as discussed by the authors is a poetics for post-modernism, and it is also related to our poetics in this paper.

384 citations