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Giles Gunn

Bio: Giles Gunn is an academic researcher from University of California, Santa Barbara. The author has contributed to research in topics: Pragmatism & Literary criticism. The author has an hindex of 12, co-authored 34 publications receiving 746 citations. Previous affiliations of Giles Gunn include University of Chicago & University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Papers
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Book
01 Dec 1992
TL;DR: Redrawing the Boundaries as discussed by the authors is a collection of essays by twenty-four leading scholars examining the major developments that have expanded the horizons of English and American literary studies during recent decades.
Abstract: In this collection of essays, twenty-four leading scholars examine the major developments that have expanded the horizons of English and American literary studies during recent decades.Redrawing the Boundaries reviews the significant scholarship for major historical periods and surveys new directions in literary criticism and in composition studies. Each essay is accompanied by an annotated list of suggestions for further reading; the book concludes with an extensive list of works cited and a name index.For scholars, teachers, and students of literature, this remarkable work provides an essential overview of traditions and innovations that make up English and American literary studies today.

164 citations

Book
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: The writings of William James represent one of America's most original contributions to the history of ideas as mentioned in this paper, ranging from philosophy and psychology to religion and politics, James composed the most engaging formulation of American pragmatism.
Abstract: The writings of William James represent one of America's most original contributions to the history of ideas. Ranging from philosophy and psychology to religion and politics, James composed the most engaging formulation of American pragmatism. "Pragmatism" grew out of a set of lectures and the full text is included here along with "The Meaning of Truth", "Psychology", "The Will to Believe", and "Talks to Teachers on Psychology".

145 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Gunn as discussed by the authors argues that this pragmatic legacy must be revaluated in the light of challenges posed by structuralist and post-structuralist theory, and challenges the assumptions of modern criticism with a revised interpretation of pragmatism.
Abstract: This important new work is at once a provocative defence of the kind of moral reflection once associated in America with the writings of Lionel Trilling and Edmund Wilson and an acknowledgement that this pragmatic legacy must be revaluated in the light of challenges posed by structuralist and post-structuralist theory. Gunn challenges the assumptions of modern criticism with a revised interpretation of pragmatism and its critical legacy.

64 citations

Book
01 Jan 1987
TL;DR: Gunn as mentioned in this paper argues that this pragmatic legacy must be revaluated in the light of challenges posed by structuralist and post-structuralist theory, and challenges the assumptions of modern criticism with a revised interpretation of pragmatism.
Abstract: This important new work is at once a provocative defence of the kind of moral reflection once associated in America with the writings of Lionel Trilling and Edmund Wilson and an acknowledgement that this pragmatic legacy must be revaluated in the light of challenges posed by structuralist and post-structuralist theory. Gunn challenges the assumptions of modern criticism with a revised interpretation of pragmatism and its critical legacy.

63 citations

01 Apr 2004
TL;DR: On the other hand, the authors argues that "the geographies of feeling which in literature must be submitted to, expressed through, and realized in the disciplines of form are nonetheless -and often in ways sometimes disguised even from their authors, when not purposely disguised by their authors" expressions of power, toward which our own work should aspire.
Abstract: On Edward Said Edward Said, as virtually no one else in literary and cultural studies in America during the last two decades, became the conscience of our profession. By conscience I mean that scholars, teachers, and critics of literature looked more often to him than to any other colleague not only for how to reframe their subject but, still more significantly, for how to reconstrue their task -- even when, on individual issues and questions, they may not have agreed with him in all particulars or been able to follow exactly where he led. The only other Anglo-American critic and scholar and public intellectual who in different ways served a comparable function for his own peers was Raymond Williams. I make this claim without pretending to be an expert in most of the traditions, texts, or topics in which Said himself was a master. Though I have read at one time or another most of his major books on literature and related matters, all I can claim is a certain familiarity with the generation of American literary and critical intellectuals to which Said belonged, since I belong to the same one, and all I can attest is some of the ways in which, more than any other national figure, he broadened our conceptual horizons and deepened our sense of the “gravitas,” to use a word favored in describing his own criticism, toward which our own work should aspire. Said showed us how critical inquiry could take on moral traction in at least three different but related ways. Politically he did so by contending that the geographies of feeling which in literature must be submitted to, expressed through, and realized in the disciplines of form are nonetheless – and often in ways sometimes disguised even from their authors, when not purposely disguised by their authors -- expressions of power,

60 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 1991
TL;DR: One of the first books to shine a light on the broad scope of translation studies, the Routledge Translation Classic as mentioned in this paper is widely regarded as a pillar of the discipline of translation.
Abstract: One of the first books to shine a light on the broad scope of translation studies, this Routledge Translation Classic is widely regarded as a pillar of the discipline. Authored by one of the most infl uential translation theorists of the twentieth century, Translation, Rewriting, and the Manipulation of Literary Fame shows how rewriting – translation, anthologization, historiography, criticism, editing – infl uences the reception and canonization of works of literature. Firmly placing the production and reception of literature within the wider framework of a culture and its history, Andre Lefevere explores how rewriting manipulates works of literature to ideological and artistic ends, and demonstrates how rewriting a text can give it a new, sometimes subversive, historical or literary status. Ranging across various literatures, including Classical Latin, French, and German, and here reissued with a new foreword by Scott G. Williams, this is a seminal text for all students and specialists in translation studies, literary theory, and comparative and world literature.

1,016 citations

Book
01 Jan 1995

1,000 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: This article analyzed consumer narratives through which a brand-mediated moral conflict is enacted and showed that consumers' moralistic identity work is culturally framed by the myth of the moral protagonist and further illuminate how consumers use this mythic structure to transform their ideological beliefs into dramatic narratives of identity.
Abstract: Consumer researchers have tended to equate consumer moralism with normative condemnations of mainstream consumer culture. Consequently, little research has investigated the multifaceted forms of identity work that consumers can undertake through more diverse ideological forms of consumer moralism. To redress this theoretical gap, we analyze the adversarial consumer narratives through which a brand-mediated moral conflict is enacted. We show that consumers’ moralistic identity work is culturally framed by the myth of the moral protagonist and further illuminate how consumers use this mythic structure to transform their ideological beliefs into dramatic narratives of identity. Our resulting theoretical framework ex- plicates identity-value–enhancing relationships among mythic structure, ideological meanings, and marketplace resources that have not been recognized by prior studies of consumer identity work.

269 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article analyzed consumer narratives through which a brand-mediated moral conflict is enacted and showed that consumers' moralistic identity work is culturally framed by the myth of the moral protagonist and further illuminate how consumers use this mythic structure to transform their ideological beliefs into dramatic narratives of identity.
Abstract: Consumer researchers have tended to equate consumer moralism with normative condemnations of mainstream consumer culture. Consequently, little research has investigated the multifaceted forms of identity work that consumers can undertake through more diverse ideological forms of consumer moralism. To redress this theoretical gap, we analyze the adversarial consumer narratives through which a brand‐mediated moral conflict is enacted. We show that consumers’ moralistic identity work is culturally framed by the myth of the moral protagonist and further illuminate how consumers use this mythic structure to transform their ideological beliefs into dramatic narratives of identity. Our resulting theoretical framework explicates identity‐value–enhancing relationships among mythic structure, ideological meanings, and marketplace resources that have not been recognized by prior studies of consumer identity work.

253 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The World's Only Klan Museum as discussed by the authors was built by John Howard in the old Echo Theater, which is located just a stone's throw, as they say, from the county courthouse in the center of town.
Abstract: Let me begin with the story of two museums. In Laurens, South Carolina, John Howard has built one in the old Echo Theater, which is located just a stone's throw, as they say, from the county courthouse in the center of town. The marquee blares, "The World's Only Klan Museum." Inside, there are robes, books, Confederate flags, pocket knives, "White Power" sweatshirts, even T-shirts declaring "It's a White Thing. You Wouldn't Understand." When the local authorities denied Howard a business license to sell souvenirs in the Redneck Shop, he threatened to take his case to court. Suzanne Coe, lawyer for Shannon Faulkner of the Citadel controversy, became his legal counsel; like that earlier case, she said this one, too, was about civil rights.1

234 citations