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Giuseppe Resnati

Bio: Giuseppe Resnati is an academic researcher from Polytechnic University of Milan. The author has contributed to research in topics: Halogen bond & Supramolecular chemistry. The author has an hindex of 69, co-authored 428 publications receiving 24373 citations. Previous affiliations of Giuseppe Resnati include Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia & Cardiff University.


Papers
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TL;DR: The specific advantages brought up by a design based on the use of the halogen bond will be demonstrated in quite different fields spanning from material sciences to biomolecular recognition and drug design.
Abstract: The halogen bond occurs when there is evidence of a net attractive interaction between an electrophilic region associated with a halogen atom in a molecular entity and a nucleophilic region in another, or the same, molecular entity. In this fairly extensive review, after a brief history of the interaction, we will provide the reader with a snapshot of where the research on the halogen bond is now, and, perhaps, where it is going. The specific advantages brought up by a design based on the use of the halogen bond will be demonstrated in quite different fields spanning from material sciences to biomolecular recognition and drug design.

2,582 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The main features of the interaction are given, and the close similarity with the hydrogen bonding will become apparent, and some heuristic principles are presented to develop a rational crystal engineering based on halogen bonding.
Abstract: Halogen bonding is the noncovalent interaction between halogen atoms (Lewis acids) and neutral or anionic Lewis bases. The main features of the interaction are given, and the close similarity with the hydrogen bonding will become apparent. Some heuristic principles are presented to develop a rational crystal engineering based on halogen bonding. The focus is on halogen-bonded supramolecular architectures given by halocarbons. The potential of the interaction is shown by useful applications in the field of synthetic chemistry, material science, and bioorganic chemistry.

1,673 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a definition for the term ''halogen bond'' is proposed, which designates a specific subset of the inter-and intramolecular interactions involving a halogen atom in a molecular entity.
Abstract: This recommendation proposes a definition for the term ``halogen bond'', which designates a specific subset of the inter- and intramolecular interactions involving a halogen atom in a molecular entity.

1,386 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the energy and geometrical features of the interaction are described along with the atomic characteristics that confer molecules with the specific ability to interact through this interaction, and some principles are presented for crystal engineering based on halogen-bonding interactions.
Abstract: Halogen bonding is the noncovalent interaction where halogen atoms function as electrophilic species. The energetic and geometrical features of the interaction are described along with the atomic characteristics that confer molecules with the specific ability to interact through this interaction. Halogen bonding has an impact on all research fields where the control of intermolecular recognition and self-assembly processes plays a key role. Some principles are presented for crystal engineering based on halogen-bonding interactions. The potential of the interaction is also shown by applications in liquid crystals, magnetic and conducting materials, and biological systems.

1,358 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is shown how application of fluorination is used to enable a number of reactions, to improve materials properties and even open up new fields of research.
Abstract: Interactions of “organic fluorine” have gained great interest not only in the context of crystal engineering, but also in the systematic design of functional materials. The first part of this tutorial review presents an overview on interactions known by organic fluorine. This involves π–πF, C–F⋯H, F⋯F, C–F⋯πF, C–F⋯π, C–F⋯M+, C–F⋯CO and anion–πF interactions, as well as other halogen bonds. The effect of the exchange of H vs. F is discussed by means of several examples and a short introduction to the young field of “fluorous” chemistry is given. The second part is dedicated to numerous applications of fluorine and fluorous interactions. It is shown how application of fluorination is used to enable a number of reactions, to improve materials properties and even open up new fields of research.

885 citations


Cited by
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10 Mar 1970

8,159 citations

01 Dec 1991
TL;DR: In this article, self-assembly is defined as the spontaneous association of molecules under equilibrium conditions into stable, structurally well-defined aggregates joined by noncovalent bonds.
Abstract: Molecular self-assembly is the spontaneous association of molecules under equilibrium conditions into stable, structurally well-defined aggregates joined by noncovalent bonds. Molecular self-assembly is ubiquitous in biological systems and underlies the formation of a wide variety of complex biological structures. Understanding self-assembly and the associated noncovalent interactions that connect complementary interacting molecular surfaces in biological aggregates is a central concern in structural biochemistry. Self-assembly is also emerging as a new strategy in chemical synthesis, with the potential of generating nonbiological structures with dimensions of 1 to 10(2) nanometers (with molecular weights of 10(4) to 10(10) daltons). Structures in the upper part of this range of sizes are presently inaccessible through chemical synthesis, and the ability to prepare them would open a route to structures comparable in size (and perhaps complementary in function) to those that can be prepared by microlithography and other techniques of microfabrication.

2,591 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The specific advantages brought up by a design based on the use of the halogen bond will be demonstrated in quite different fields spanning from material sciences to biomolecular recognition and drug design.
Abstract: The halogen bond occurs when there is evidence of a net attractive interaction between an electrophilic region associated with a halogen atom in a molecular entity and a nucleophilic region in another, or the same, molecular entity. In this fairly extensive review, after a brief history of the interaction, we will provide the reader with a snapshot of where the research on the halogen bond is now, and, perhaps, where it is going. The specific advantages brought up by a design based on the use of the halogen bond will be demonstrated in quite different fields spanning from material sciences to biomolecular recognition and drug design.

2,582 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, it was shown that the same alkylhydridoplatinum(IV) complex is the intermediate in the reaction of ethane with platinum(II) σ-complexes.
Abstract: ion. The oxidative addition mechanism was originally proposed22i because of the lack of a strong rate dependence on polar factors and on the acidity of the medium. Later, however, the electrophilic substitution mechanism also was proposed. Recently, the oxidative addition mechanism was confirmed by investigations into the decomposition and protonolysis of alkylplatinum complexes, which are the reverse of alkane activation. There are two routes which operate in the decomposition of the dimethylplatinum(IV) complex Cs2Pt(CH3)2Cl4. The first route leads to chloride-induced reductive elimination and produces methyl chloride and methane. The second route leads to the formation of ethane. There is strong kinetic evidence that the ethane is produced by the decomposition of an ethylhydridoplatinum(IV) complex formed from the initial dimethylplatinum(IV) complex. In D2O-DCl, the ethane which is formed contains several D atoms and has practically the same multiple exchange parameter and distribution as does an ethane which has undergone platinum(II)-catalyzed H-D exchange with D2O. Moreover, ethyl chloride is formed competitively with H-D exchange in the presence of platinum(IV). From the principle of microscopic reversibility it follows that the same ethylhydridoplatinum(IV) complex is the intermediate in the reaction of ethane with platinum(II). Important results were obtained by Labinger and Bercaw62c in the investigation of the protonolysis mechanism of several alkylplatinum(II) complexes at low temperatures. These reactions are important because they could model the microscopic reverse of C-H activation by platinum(II) complexes. Alkylhydridoplatinum(IV) complexes were observed as intermediates in certain cases, such as when the complex (tmeda)Pt(CH2Ph)Cl or (tmeda)PtMe2 (tmeda ) N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylenediamine) was treated with HCl in CD2Cl2 or CD3OD, respectively. In some cases H-D exchange took place between the methyl groups on platinum and the, CD3OD prior to methane loss. On the basis of the kinetic results, a common mechanism was proposed to operate in all the reactions: (1) protonation of Pt(II) to generate an alkylhydridoplatinum(IV) intermediate, (2) dissociation of solvent or chloride to generate a cationic, fivecoordinate platinum(IV) species, (3) reductive C-H bond formation, producing a platinum(II) alkane σ-complex, and (4) loss of the alkane either through an associative or dissociative substitution pathway. These results implicate the presence of both alkane σ-complexes and alkylhydridoplatinum(IV) complexes as intermediates in the Pt(II)-induced C-H activation reactions. Thus, the first step in the alkane activation reaction is formation of a σ-complex with the alkane, which then undergoes oxidative addition to produce an alkylhydrido complex. Reversible interconversion of these intermediates, together with reversible deprotonation of the alkylhydridoplatinum(IV) complexes, leads to multiple H-D exchange

2,505 citations