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Glen Creeber

Bio: Glen Creeber is an academic researcher from Cardiff University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Narrative & Glocalization. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 3 publications receiving 94 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
Glen Creeber1
TL;DR: The authors argues that the rise of the television serial actually indicates the coming of age of TV drama, arguing that the serial is a particularly suitable form for the portrayal of large historical narratives, especially those that, by necessity, cover a large area both in terms of space and time.
Abstract: This article argues against the generally agreed assumption that the demise of the single play heralded the decline in the standards of television drama generally. In contrast, it suggests that the rise of the television serial actually indicates the coming of age of TV drama. Unlike the `teleplay' that originally arose out of a strong theatrical tradition, the serial or `mini-series' better utilizes the generic aesthetics of television and the fundamental dynamics of its audience's viewing habits. In particular, it will demonstrate how the episodic nature of the drama serial successfully mimics and harnesses the many complex, multi-layered levels of both the series and soap opera, while retaining and redefining the finite narrative arch of the single play. This makes the serial a particularly suitable form for the portrayal of large historical narratives, especially those that, by necessity, cover a large area both in terms of space and time. Paying close attention to serials such as Roots (1977), Holoca...

42 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Creeber, G. as mentioned in this paper, G. (2004). Hideously White: British Television, Glocalization and National Identity. Television and New Media. 5 (1), 27-39.
Abstract: Creeber, G. (2004). Hideously White: British Television, Glocalization and National Identity. Television and New Media. 5 (1), 27-39. RAE2008

40 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
Sangkyun Kim1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated the extent to which audience involvement or engagement with a serialised TV drama affects their actual on-site film tourism experiences at its former filmed locations and found that audience's emotional and behavioural involvement was the main driver that positively affected their movie tourism experiences, and that the more emotional involvement audience develops through viewing the TV drama, the greater the likelihood of them visiting film tourism locations.

239 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Sangkyun Kim1
TL;DR: This article examined the context and meanings of photographs taken by tourists who are re-enacting scenes from the series during their visit to Nami Island, the main filming location of Winter Sonata, in South Korea.
Abstract: This paper explores the ways in which screen tourism locations and their associated tourist experiences are (re)produced, contextualised and performed through production and consumption of a Korean television drama series entitled, Winter Sonata. As an exploratory case study based on visual image analysis, this paper examines the context and meanings of photographs taken by tourists who are re-enacting scenes from the series during their visit to Nami Island, the main filming location of Winter Sonata, in South Korea. The photographs are compared with the still images of original scenes in the series. The findings of this comparison suggest that previous viewing experiences of the television series not only created personalised memories and attachment with its filming location, but also produced new touristic spaces. The previous viewing experiences also induced the audiences to visit the filming locations and to perform reflexive and extraordinary touristic experiences in the form of re-enacting scenes f...

109 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a case study of Korean popular television dramas is presented to provide insights on the relationships between this phenomenon and patterns of tourism in Korea related to the wider concept of screen-tourism.
Abstract: This paper examines a popular cultural phenomenon originating in Korea which has assumed significance across Asia and beyond. This ‘Korean wave’ or Hallyu includes the circulation and consumption of Korean popular television dramas. An exploratory case study approach is presented to provide insights on the relationships between this phenomenon and patterns of tourism in Korea related to the wider concept of screen-tourism. The paper addresses the relative lack of attention to television programming within the film tourism literature, particularly in non-Western and non-English language settings. Some common assumptions in the film tourism literature are challenged here, including: the inter-changeability of large-screen films and programmes produced for the television; and the inter-cultural circulation of film and television programmes as catalysts for tourism. Our findings illustrate that the inter-cultural circulation of Hallyu television dramas, particularly in neighbouring countries in Asia,...

93 citations

Book
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: Part 1: The Writing Process 1. Background to writing 2. Developing plans from titles 3. Evaluating a text 4. Understanding purpose and register 5. Selecting key points 6. Proof-reading
Abstract: Part 1: The Writing Process 1. Background to writing 2. Developing plans from titles 3. Evaluating a text 4. Understanding purpose and register 5. Selecting key points 6. Note-making 7. Paraphrasing 8. Summary writing 9. Combining sources 10. Planning a text 11. Organising paragraphs 12. Organising the main body 13. Introductions 14. Conclusions 15. Re-reading and re-writing 16. Proof-reading Part 2: Elements of Writing 1. Cause and effect 2. Cohesion 3. Comparisons 4. Definitions 5. Discussion 6. Examples 7. Generalisations 8. Numbers 9. References and quotations 10. Style 11. Synonyms 12. Visual Information Part 3: Accuracy in Writing 1. Abbreviations 2. Adverbs 3. Articles 4. Caution 5. Conjunctions 6. Formality in verbs 7. Modal verbs 8. Nationality language 9. Nouns and adjectives 10. Nouns: countable and uncountable 11. Passives 12. Prefixes and suffixes 13. Prepositions 14. Prepositions after verbs 15. Punctuation 16. Referring verbs 17. Relative pronouns 18. Singular/plural 19. Tenses 20. Time words and phrases Part 4: Writing Models 1. Formal letters 2. CVs 3. Designing and reporting surveys 4. Comparison essay 5. Discursive essay

74 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a critical review of recent literature and policy concepts is put together to consider the relationship between race and UK public service broadcasting, and the rise of creative diversity alongside parallel developments in the crisis of multiculturalism, UK equality legislative frameworks, and creative industries policy.
Abstract: Through a critical review of recent literature and policy concepts, this article puts together history and analysis to consider the relationship between race and UK public service broadcasting. Building on earlier work that recognizes a paradigmatic shift from multiculturalism to cultural diversity, this article identifies a third phase, “creative diversity.” Creative diversity provides a further incremental depoliticization of race in public service broadcasting contexts. Here, ideas of quality and creativity are foregrounded over (structural) questions of (in)equality or the positive recognition of social and cultural difference. The article situates the rise of creative diversity alongside parallel developments in the “crisis of multiculturalism,” UK equality legislative frameworks, and creative industries policy. It is argued that creative diversity shifts the paradigm of the multicultural problem (in public service broadcasting), enables the “marketization” of television and multiculture, and ultimat...

71 citations