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Author

Gong Jian-guo

Bio: Gong Jian-guo is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Statute & Constitution. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 7 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the United States, and in Western nations generally, interpretation of constitutional provisions and statutes is considered to be the essence of the judicial function as mentioned in this paper. But in the People's Republic of China, interpreting constitutional provisions is considered a secondary task.
Abstract: In the United States, and in Western nations generally, interpretation of constitutional provisions and statutes is considered to be the essence of the judicial function. In the People's Republic o...

7 citations


Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Apr 2019

26 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Apr 2019

23 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Apr 2019

22 citations

Book
25 Apr 2019
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on the entrenched, fundamental divergence between the Hong Kong Court of Final Appeal and Macau's Tribunal de Ultima Instância over their constitutional jurisprudence, with the former repeatedly invalidating unconstitutional legislation with finality and the latter having never challenged the constitutionality of legislation at all.
Abstract: This is the first book that focuses on the entrenched, fundamental divergence between the Hong Kong Court of Final Appeal and Macau's Tribunal de Ultima Instância over their constitutional jurisprudence, with the former repeatedly invalidating unconstitutional legislation with finality and the latter having never challenged the constitutionality of legislation at all. This divergence is all the more remarkable when considered in the light of the fact that the two Regions, commonly subject to oversight by China's authoritarian Party-state, possess constitutional frameworks that are nearly identical; feature similar hybrid regimes; and share a lot in history, ethnicity, culture, and language. Informed by political science and economics, this book breaks new ground by locating the cause of this anomaly, studied within the universe of authoritarian constitutionalism, not in the common law-civil law differences between these two former European dependencies, but the disparate levels of political transaction costs therein.

17 citations