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Gregor Schoeler

Bio: Gregor Schoeler is an academic researcher from University of Basel. The author has contributed to research in topics: Oral Torah & Redaction. The author has an hindex of 9, co-authored 26 publications receiving 307 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: In this paper, the use and function of writing in early Islam is discussed, and who is the Author of the Kitab Al-'Ayn is identified as one of the authors.
Abstract: Editor's Introduction 1. The Transmission of the Science in Early Islam: Oral or Written? 2. The Transmission of the Sciences in Early Islam Revisited 3. Writing and Publishing: On the Use and Function of Writing in Early Islam 4. Oral Poetry Theory and Arabic Literature 5. Oral Torah and Hadit: Transmission, Prohibition of Writing, Redaction 6. Who is the Author of the Kitab Al-'Ayn

60 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The question of whether the Quellen, which den großen, den Isnäd verwendenden, kompilatorischen Werken liegen, hauptsächlich schriftlich oder mündlich waren, is bis heute kontrovers.
Abstract: Die Frage, ob die Quellen, die den großen, den Isnäd (Überliefererketten) verwendenden, kompilatorischen Werken der arabisch-islamischen Wissenschaften des 8.-10. Jh.s n. Chr. (Mälik b. Anas' K al-Muwatta\\ Ibn Ishäq's K. al-Magäzi, al-Buhärf s und Muslim's Sahih'en, at-Tabari's Annalen\\mA Korarücommentar, Abu 1-Farag al-Isfahäni's K. cd-Agämusvr.) zugrunde liegen, hauptsächlich schriftlich oder mündlich waren, ist bis heute kontrovers. Nachdem NABIA ABBOTT in ihren Studies inArabic Literary Papyri), gestützt auf eine Vielfalt von Belegen, darunter Papyrusfragmente aus der Umaiyadenzeit, den Standpunkt einer frühen und kontinuierlich wachsenden Schriftlichkeit vertreten hatte und nachdem FUAT SEZGIN in seiner Geschichte des arabischen Schrifttums) die genaue Methode für eine Rekonstruktion der—wie er meint — durchweg schriftlichen Quellen jener Kompilationen geliefert) und darüber hinaus die Wiederentdeckung einer Reihe von frühen, den Kompilationen zugrunde liegenden Quellenwerken angekündigt hatte), waren, so schien es, früher vertretene Auffassungen von einer weitgehenden Mündlichkeit der Überlieferung der arabisch-islamischen Wissenschaften bis hin zu den großen Kompilationen) endgültig überwunden.

37 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a critical review of Shoemaker's analysis of the works of Schoeler, Motzki, and Gorke on the authenticity of the first century of the Hijra.
Abstract: In a recent issue of Der Islam, Stephen R. Shoemaker has contributed an extensive article in which he challenged the processes and findings of a number of studies conducted by Gregor Schoeler, Harald Motzki, and Andreas Gorke. 1 The following article offers a response to his findings. Whereas the three authors argued the case for the possibility that authentic traditions of the first century of the Hijra can be reconstructed, Shoemaker holds the contrary point of view, as already stated in the abstract of his study: "While az-Zuhr\ and occasion- ally other authorities of his generation can often be persuasively linked with the tradition in question, the reach back to ^Urwa is generally not convincing …" Yet he is not entirely consistent in his views. In his study several statements are to be found that in fact support the views of the authors whose studies he critically examines. Overall, Shoemaker makes more concessions towards the possible authenticity of some of the material traced back to the first century than any "sceptic" prior to him. Unfortunately, Shoemaker's criticism and rendering of the three authors' studies is fraught with misunderstandings and inconsistencies. They are the focus of attention in this critical review. In addition, hitherto un- known traditions as well as sources that Shoemaker mentions without quoting or paraphrasing them will be presented. This material also challenges a number of Shoemaker's key conclusions.

28 citations


Cited by
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Book
Wael B. Hallaq1
09 Dec 2004
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present an important account of how Islam developed its own law while drawing on ancient Near Eastern legal cultures, Arabian customary law and Quranic reforms, and explore the interplay between law and politics, explaining how the jurists and the ruling elite led a symbiotic existence that allowed Islamic law and its application to be uniquely independent of the'state'.
Abstract: Long before the rise of Islam in the early seventh century, Arabia had come to form an integral part of the Near East. This book, covering more than three centuries of legal history, presents an important account of how Islam developed its own law while drawing on ancient Near Eastern legal cultures, Arabian customary law and Quranic reforms. The development of the judiciary, legal reasoning and legal authority during the first century is discussed in detail as is the dramatic rise of prophetic authority, the crystallization of legal theory and the formation of the all-important legal schools. Finally the book explores the interplay between law and politics, explaining how the jurists and the ruling elite led a symbiotic existence that - seemingly paradoxically - allowed Islamic law and its application to be uniquely independent of the 'state'.

207 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The bubonic plague outbreak of the 6th and 7th centuries as mentioned in this paper spread through the Nile Delta and passed to Syrian ports in the winter of that year; by the summer of 542 it had reached Constantinople itself and infected, among many other places, large parts of inland Asia Minor and Syria.
Abstract: Any interpretation of Near Eastern history touching upon the sixth and seventh centuries must invariably come to terms with the numerous causes of mortality, destruction, and social and economic disruption that preceded the Arab conquests. One of these factors was undoubtedly the bubonic plague, which descended the Nile in the summer of 641, spread through the Delta and passed to Syrian ports in the winter of that year; by the summer of 542 it had reached Constantinople itself and infected, among many other places, large parts of inland Asia Minor and Syria.

107 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 2010

73 citations

Book
08 Sep 2015
TL;DR: In this paper, the author explores how Muslims have read the Qur'an and the Prophetic legacy in light of their learned heritage, philosophical commitments, and view of how the world ought to be.
Abstract: The question of interpretation is the fulcrum about which all textual traditions turn, whether religious or secular. Here the author is concerned with the ‘choices and challenges’ presented by the Islamic canon – a composite of the Qur’an and the Prophetic legacy – and the storied history of its interpretation(s). Starting with the premise that the Muslim scholarly tradition is as deserving of respect as any other, Brown accompanies us through the winding lanes of scriptural exegesis, asking how Muslims have read sacred texts in light of their learned heritage, philosophical commitments, and view of how the world ought to be. The inquiry is wide-ranging; our journey begins with the formative debates between ahl al-hadith and ahl al-ra’y, and flits back and forth between the interpretive struggles of a superlatively rich historical dramatis personae. Drawing on the notion of the canon, Brown highlights the ‘charity’ extended to scripture by the pre-moderns and contrasts it to the apparently more philologically straightforward approach often preferred by the moderns. He turns this equation on its head, however, carefully deconstructing the post-Reformation view that scripture is amenable to common-sense acts of reading and exposing the extent to which even the most diehard opponents of the scholarly tradition cannot escape their indebtedness to it. Brown is sensitive to the structural parallels between Islam and other Abrahamic religions and, more broadly, the interpretive challenges faced by other exegetes of canonical texts – from Supreme Court Justices to ancient rhetoricians. The aim is both to skewer the Otherising prejudices of Euro-America as well as to establish the premodern (Muslim) capacity for ‘being at home in the world’, in contrast to today. In the centres of power secular truths now reign, and it can be easy to forget that the quest to understand scripture and the world it was revealed to has not always been played as a zero sum game.

60 citations

Book
30 Sep 2013
TL;DR: In this article, the prophet Mohammad's Persian companion, Salman al-Farisi, was described as a prophet who asserted the end of the past and reformed Iranians' memories of pre-Islamic times.
Abstract: 1. Prior connections to Islam 2. Muhammad's Persian companion, Salman al-Farisi 3. Finding meaning in the past 4. Reforming Iranians' memories of pre-Islamic times 5. The unhappy prophet 6. Asserting the end of the past.

57 citations