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Grzegorz Deptuch

Bio: Grzegorz Deptuch is an academic researcher from Fermilab. The author has contributed to research in topics: Detector & Pixel. The author has an hindex of 30, co-authored 162 publications receiving 3523 citations. Previous affiliations of Grzegorz Deptuch include Centre national de la recherche scientifique & International Pentecostal Holiness Church.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
S. Chatrchyan, Khachatryan1, Albert M. Sirunyan, Armen Tumasyan  +2384 moreInstitutions (207)
26 May 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, a description of the software algorithms developed for the CMS tracker both for reconstructing charged-particle trajectories in proton-proton interactions and for using the resulting tracks to estimate the positions of the LHC luminous region and individual primary-interaction vertices is provided.
Abstract: A description is provided of the software algorithms developed for the CMS tracker both for reconstructing charged-particle trajectories in proton-proton interactions and for using the resulting tracks to estimate the positions of the LHC luminous region and individual primary-interaction vertices. Despite the very hostile environment at the LHC, the performance obtained with these algorithms is found to be excellent. For tt events under typical 2011 pileup conditions, the average track-reconstruction efficiency for promptly-produced charged particles with transverse momenta of p_T > 0.9GeV is 94% for pseudorapidities of |η| < 0.9 and 85% for 0.9 < |η| < 2.5. The inefficiency is caused mainly by hadrons that undergo nuclear interactions in the tracker material. For isolated muons, the corresponding efficiencies are essentially 100%. For isolated muons of p_T = 100GeV emitted at |η| < 1.4, the resolutions are approximately 2.8% in p_T, and respectively, 10μm and 30μm in the transverse and longitudinal impact parameters. The position resolution achieved for reconstructed primary vertices that correspond to interesting pp collisions is 10–12μm in each of the three spatial dimensions. The tracking and vertexing software is fast and flexible, and easily adaptable to other functions, such as fast tracking for the trigger, or dedicated tracking for electrons that takes into account bremsstrahlung.

559 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a novel active pixel sensor (MAPS) for charged particle tracking made in a standard CMOS technology is proposed, which has a special structure, which allows the high detection efficiency required for tracking applications.
Abstract: A novel Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) for charged particle tracking made in a standard CMOS technology is proposed. The sensor is a photodiode, which is readily available in a CMOS technology. The diode has a special structure, which allows the high detection efficiency required for tracking applications. The partially depleted thin epitaxial silicon layer is used as a sensitive detector volume. Semiconductor device simulation, using either ToSCA based or 3-D ISE-TCAD software packages shows that the charge collection is efficient, reasonably fast (order of 100 ns), and the charge spreading limited to a few pixels only. A first prototype has been designed, fabricated and tested. It is made of four arrays each containing 64×64 pixels, with a readout pitch of 20 μm in both directions. The device is fabricated using standard submicron 0.6 μm CMOS process, which features twin-tub implanted in a p-type epitaxial layer, a characteristic common to many modern CMOS VLSI processes. Extensive tests made with soft X-ray source ( 55 Fe) and minimum ionising particles (15 GeV/ c pions) fully demonstrate the predicted performances, with the individual pixel noise (ENC) below 20 electrons and the Signal-to-Noise ratio for both 5.9 keV X-rays and Minimum Ionising Particles (MIP) of the order of 30. This novel device opens new perspectives in high-precision vertex detectors in Particle Physics experiments, as well as in other application, like low-energy beta particle imaging, visible light single photon imaging (using the Hybrid Photon Detector approach) and high-precision slow neutron imaging.

395 citations

ReportDOI
B. Abi1, R. Acciarri1, M. A. Acero1, G. Adamov1  +956 moreInstitutions (1)
TL;DR: The Dune experiment as discussed by the authors is an international world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions as it searches for leptonic charge-parity symmetry violation, stands ready to capture supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model.
Abstract: The preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of the supernovae that produced the heavy elements necessary for life, and whether protons eventually decay -- these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our universe, its current state, and its eventual fate. DUNE is an international world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions as it searches for leptonic charge-parity symmetry violation, stands ready to capture supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector technical design report (TDR) describes the DUNE physics program and the technical designs of the single- and dual-phase DUNE liquid argon TPC far detector modules. Volume II of this TDR, DUNE Physics, describes the array of identified scientific opportunities and key goals. Crucially, we also report our best current understanding of the capability of DUNE to realize these goals, along with the detailed arguments and investigations on which this understanding is based. This TDR volume documents the scientific basis underlying the conception and design of the LBNF/DUNE experimental configurations. As a result, the description of DUNE's experimental capabilities constitutes the bulk of the document. Key linkages between requirements for successful execution of the physics program and primary specifications of the experimental configurations are drawn and summarized. This document also serves a wider purpose as a statement on the scientific potential of DUNE as a central component within a global program of frontier theoretical and experimental particle physics research. Thus, the presentation also aims to serve as a resource for the particle physics community at large.

215 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
B. Abi1, R. Acciarri2, M. A. Acero3, George Adamov4  +966 moreInstitutions (155)
TL;DR: The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) as discussed by the authors is an international world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions as it searches for leptonic charge-parity symmetry violation, stands ready to capture supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model.
Abstract: The preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of the supernovae that produced the heavy elements necessary for life, and whether protons eventually decay—these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our universe, its current state, and its eventual fate. The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is an international world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions as it searches for leptonic charge-parity symmetry violation, stands ready to capture supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector technical design report (TDR) describes the DUNE physics program and the technical designs of the single- and dual-phase DUNE liquid argon TPC far detector modules. This TDR is intended to justify the technical choices for the far detector that flow down from the high-level physics goals through requirements at all levels of the Project. Volume I contains an executive summary that introduces the DUNE science program, the far detector and the strategy for its modular designs, and the organization and management of the Project. The remainder of Volume I provides more detail on the science program that drives the choice of detector technologies and on the technologies themselves. It also introduces the designs for the DUNE near detector and the DUNE computing model, for which DUNE is planning design reports. Volume II of this TDR describes DUNE's physics program in detail. Volume III describes the technical coordination required for the far detector design, construction, installation, and integration, and its organizational structure. Volume IV describes the single-phase far detector technology. A planned Volume V will describe the dual-phase technology.

187 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
15 Oct 2000
TL;DR: In this paper, a monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) for charged particle tracking based on a novel detector structure was proposed, simulated, fabricated and tested, which is inseparable from the readout electronics, since both of them are integrated onto the same, standard for a CMOS process.
Abstract: A monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) for charged particle tracking based on a novel detector structure was proposed, simulated, fabricated and tested. The detector designed accordingly to this idea is inseparable from the readout electronics, since both of them are integrated onto the same, standard for a CMOS process, low-resistivity silicon wafer. The individual pixel is comprised of only 3 MOS transistors and a photodiode collecting the charge created in a thin undepleted epitaxial layer. This approach provides the whole detector surface sensitive to radiation (100% fill factor) with reduced pixel pitch(very high spatial resolution). This yields a low cost, high resolution and thin detecting device. The detailed device simulations using an ISE-TCAD package have been carried out in order to study a charge collection mechanism and to validate the proposed idea. Consequently, two prototype chips have been fabricated using 0.6 /spl mu/m and 0.35 /spl mu/m CMOS processes. Special radiation tolerant layout techniques were used in the second chip design. Both chips were tested and fully characterised. The pixel conversion gain was calibrated using 5.9 keV photons and prototype devices were exposed to the 120 GeV/c pion beams at CERN. Obtained results preceded by general design ideas and simulation results are reviewed.

123 citations


Cited by
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Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, the ATLAS experiment is described as installed in i ts experimental cavern at point 1 at CERN and a brief overview of the expec ted performance of the detector is given.
Abstract: This paper describes the ATLAS experiment as installed in i ts experimental cavern at point 1 at CERN. It also presents a brief overview of the expec ted performance of the detector.

2,798 citations

Reference EntryDOI
15 Oct 2004

2,118 citations

01 Apr 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors measured the flux of neutrino from distant nuclear reactors and found fewer nu;(e) events than expected from standard assumptions about nu; (e) propagation at the 99.95% C.L.yr exposure.
Abstract: KamLAND has measured the flux of nu;(e)'s from distant nuclear reactors. We find fewer nu;(e) events than expected from standard assumptions about nu;(e) propagation at the 99.95% C.L. In a 162 ton.yr exposure the ratio of the observed inverse beta-decay events to the expected number without nu;(e) disappearance is 0.611+/-0.085(stat)+/-0.041(syst) for nu;(e) energies >3.4 MeV. In the context of two-flavor neutrino oscillations with CPT invariance, all solutions to the solar neutrino problem except for the "large mixing angle" region are excluded.

1,659 citations