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Guy Sutter

Bio: Guy Sutter is an academic researcher from University of Lorraine. The author has contributed to research in topics: Machining & Chip formation. The author has an hindex of 13, co-authored 36 publications receiving 980 citations. Previous affiliations of Guy Sutter include Metz & Centre national de la recherche scientifique.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the chip formation for a Ti-6Al-4V alloy was studied at high cutting speeds combined with large uncut chip thicknesses (0.1-0.25mm).
Abstract: The chip formation for a Ti–6Al–4V alloy was studied at high cutting speeds combined with large uncut chip thicknesses (0.1–0.25 mm). Orthogonal cutting tests were conducted by using uncoated carbide tools on a specific ballistic set-up with cutting speeds from 300 m/min to 4400 m/min (5–75 m/s). A hypothesis on the mechanism of chip generation is proposed for this speed range validated by high-speed imaging system enabled direct observation of cutting process. A transition, from serrated more or less regular with localized shearing and possible presence of cracking, to discontinuous at very high speed is observed. The inclination of the segment Φseg is shown as resulting from the primary shear angle Φ that can be modified by compression between the tool and the uncut part. A maximum value of 60° for Φseg is reached with increasing speed after which it decreases to 45° at very high speed. The cutting speed appears as the most important factor when compared with the uncut chip thickness, in determining the formation of chips by affecting the frequency of segmentation, the shear angles and the crack length. The significant reduction of cutting forces occurring with increases in cutting speed was firstly explained by the conflicting work hardening–thermal softening processes and then depended on whether the deformation phase of the chip segment is occurred.

172 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Guy Sutter1
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors used a numerical high-speed camera to take photographs of chips during the cutting process for a large range of speeds, ranging from 17 to 60m/s.
Abstract: The originality of this work consists in taking photographs of chips during the cutting process for a large range of speeds. Contrary to methods usually used such as the quick stop in which root chips are analyzed after an abrupt interruption of the cutting, the proposed process photographs the chip geometry during its elaboration. An original device reproducing perfectly orthogonal cutting conditions is used because it allows a good accessibility to the zone of machining and reduces considerably the vibrations found in conventional machining tests. A large range of cutting velocities is investigated (from 17 to 60 m/s) for a middle hard steel (French Standards XC18). The experimental measures of the root chip geometry, more specifically the tool-chip contact length and the shear angle, are obtained from an analysis of the pictures obtained with a numerical high-speed camera. These geometrical characteristics of chips are studied for various cutting speeds, at the three rake angles −5, 0, +5° and for different depths of cut reaching 0.65 mm.

124 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Guy Sutter1, Laurent Faure1, Alain Molinari1, Nicolas Ranc2, Vincent Pina2 
TL;DR: In this article, an experimental setup was presented to determine the temperature field in the cutting zone, during an orthogonal machining operation with 42 CrMo 4 steel, performed with a gas gun, using standard carbide tools TiCN coated and for cutting speeds up to 50 ms-1.
Abstract: Cutting temperature and heat generated at the tool-chip interface during high speed machining operations have been recognized as major factors that influence tool performance and workpiece geometry or properties. This paper presents an experimental setup able to determine the temperature field in the cutting zone, during an orthogonal machining operation with 42 CrMo 4 steel. The machining was performed with a gas gun, using standard carbide tools TiCN coated and for cutting speeds up to 50 ms-1. The technique of temperature measurement was developed on the principle of pyrometry in the visible spectral range by using an intensified CCD camera with very short exposure time and interference filter at 0.8 μm. Temperature gradients were obtained in an area close to the cutting edge of the tool, along the secondary shear zone. Effects of the cutting speed and the chip thickness on the temperature profile in the chip were determined. Maximum chip temperature of about 825 °C was found, for cutting speed close to 20 ms-1, located at a distance of 300 μm of the tool tip. It was established that this experimental arrangement is quite efficient and can provide fundamental data on the temperature field in materials during orthogonal high speed machining.

118 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a finite element model using the AbaqusTM code is conducted to predict the interface cutting temperature and its dependence with the crater wear mechanism for high speed machining above 20m/s.
Abstract: A study through a finite elements model using the AbaqusTM code is conducted to predict the interface cutting temperature and its dependence with the crater wear mechanism. Unlike the most previous researches, this work is focused on the domain of the high speed machining above 20 m/s. The mechanical and thermal parameters that influence the temperature distribution at the tool rake face are analysed in details. A method based on some analytical preliminary calculations is proposed to determine the adequate values of the friction shear stress and the heat partitioning factor between the tool and the chip. A correlation between specific experiments and simulations is verified in the case of orthogonal cutting of mild steel up to a velocity of 60 m/s. Cutting tests were carried out on a ballistic device equipped with an intensified CCD camera to measure the temperature field into the chip. A good agreement is found with respect to measurements of cutting forces, contact length and temperature. As application, a wear model is coupled with the finite element model through an iterative schema. At each step of calculation, the contact pressure and temperature are updated while the crater grows.

94 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
12 May 2010-Wear
TL;DR: In this article, an experimental method is presented to measure flash temperatures of sliding surfaces using a ballistic set-up equipped with a high speed camera, and the temperature field on the friction surface was recorded during the process.

86 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a review of previous research on heat generation and heat dissipation in the orthogonal machining process and propose some modelling requirements for computer simulation of high speed machining processes.
Abstract: Determination of the maximum temperature and temperature distribution along the rake face of the cutting tool is of particular importance because of its controlling influence on tool life, as well as, the quality of the machined part. Numerous attempts have been made to approach the problem with different methods including experimental, analytical and numerical analysis. Although considerable research effort has been made on the thermal problem in metal cutting, there is hardly a consensus on the basics principles. The unique tribological contact phenomenon, which occur in metal cutting is highly localized and non-linear, and occurs at high temperatures, high pressures and high strains. This has made it extremely difficult to predict in a precise manner or even assess the performance of various models developed for modelling the machining process. Accurate and repeatable heat and temperature prediction remains challenging due to the complexity of the contact phenomena in the cutting process. In this paper, previous research on heat generation and heat dissipation in the orthogonal machining process is critically reviewed. In addition, temperature measurement techniques applied in metal cutting are briefly reviewed. The emphasis is on the comparability of test results, as well as, the relevance of temperature measurement method to high speed cutting. New temperature measurement results obtained by a thermal imaging camera in high speed cutting of high strength alloys are also presented. Finally, the latest work on estimation of heat generation, heat partition and temperature distribution in metal machining is reviewed. This includes an exploration of the different simplifying assumptions related to the geometry of the process components, material properties, boundary conditions and heat partition. The paper then proposes some modelling requirements for computer simulation of high speed machining processes.

541 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an experimental analysis of orthogonal cutting of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy is proposed, where the cutting speeds are explored in a range from 0.01 to 73 m/s by using an universal high-speed testing machine and a ballistic set-up.

368 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a review of widely used temperature measurement methods and how they can be applied to temperature monitoring during material removal is presented, using criteria critical in measuring material removal, and the results presented in guide-format for participants in this field of work.

345 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the underlying mechanisms of basic challenges, such as variation of chip thickness, high heat stress, high pressure loads, springback, and residual stress based on the available literature are investigated.
Abstract: Titanium alloys are known as difficult-to-machine materials The problems of machining titanium are many folds which depend on types of titanium alloys This paper investigates the underlying mechanisms of basic challenges, such as variation of chip thickness, high heat stress, high pressure loads, springback, and residual stress based on the available literature These are responsible for higher tool wear and worse machined surface integrity In addition, many cutting tool materials are inapt for machining titanium alloys as those materials are chemically reactive to titanium alloys under machining conditions To address these problems, latest techniques such as application of high pressure coolant, cryogenic cooling, tap testing, thermally enhanced machining, hybrid machining, and use of high conductive cutting tool and tool holder have also been discussed and correlated It seems that all the solutions are not yet well accepted in the industrial domain; further advancement in those fields are required to reduce the machining cost of titanium alloys

265 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the chip formation for a Ti-6Al-4V alloy was studied at high cutting speeds combined with large uncut chip thicknesses (0.1-0.25mm).
Abstract: The chip formation for a Ti–6Al–4V alloy was studied at high cutting speeds combined with large uncut chip thicknesses (0.1–0.25 mm). Orthogonal cutting tests were conducted by using uncoated carbide tools on a specific ballistic set-up with cutting speeds from 300 m/min to 4400 m/min (5–75 m/s). A hypothesis on the mechanism of chip generation is proposed for this speed range validated by high-speed imaging system enabled direct observation of cutting process. A transition, from serrated more or less regular with localized shearing and possible presence of cracking, to discontinuous at very high speed is observed. The inclination of the segment Φseg is shown as resulting from the primary shear angle Φ that can be modified by compression between the tool and the uncut part. A maximum value of 60° for Φseg is reached with increasing speed after which it decreases to 45° at very high speed. The cutting speed appears as the most important factor when compared with the uncut chip thickness, in determining the formation of chips by affecting the frequency of segmentation, the shear angles and the crack length. The significant reduction of cutting forces occurring with increases in cutting speed was firstly explained by the conflicting work hardening–thermal softening processes and then depended on whether the deformation phase of the chip segment is occurred.

172 citations