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Author

H. L. Seegmiller

Bio: H. L. Seegmiller is an academic researcher from Ames Research Center. The author has contributed to research in topics: Turbulence & Transonic. The author has an hindex of 7, co-authored 12 publications receiving 892 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, experimental data have been obtained in an incompressible turbulent flow over a rearward-facing step in a diverging channel flow and mean velocities, Reynolds stresses, and triple products that were measured by a laser Doppler velocimeter are presented for two cases of tunnel wall divergence.
Abstract: Experimental data have been obtained in an incompressible turbulent flow over a rearward-facing step in a diverging channel flow. Mean velocities, Reynolds stresses, and triple products that were measured by a laser Doppler velocimeter are presented for two cases of tunnel wall divergence. Eddy viscosities, production, convection, turbulent diffusion, and dissipation (balance of kinetic energy equation) terms are extracted from the data. These data are compared with various eddy-viscosity turbulence models. Numerical calculations incorporating the k-epsilon and algebraic-stress turbulence models are compared with the data. When determining quantities of engineering interest, the modified algebraic-stress model (ASM) is a significant improvement over the unmodified ASM and the unmodified k-epsilon model; however, like the others, it dramatically overpredicts the experimentally determined dissipation rate.

635 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1978
TL;DR: In this article, an investigation of the transonic flow over a circular arc airfoil was conducted to obtain basic information for turbulence modeling of shock-induced separated flows and to verify numerical computer codes which are being developed to simulate such flows.
Abstract: An investigation of the transonic flow over a circular arc airfoil was conducted to obtain basic information for turbulence modeling of shock-induced separated flows and to verify numerical computer codes which are being developed to simulate such flows. The investigation included the employment of a laser velocimeter to obtain data concerning the mean velocity, the shear stress, and the turbulent kinetic energy profiles in the flowfield downstream of the airfoil midchord where the flow features are more complex. Depending on the free-stream Mach number, the flowfield developed was either steady with shock-wave-induced separation extending from the foot of the shock wave to beyond the trailing edge or unsteady with a periodic motion also undergoing shock-induced separation. The experimental data were compared with the results of numerical simulations in which a computer code was employed that solved the time-dependent Reynolds' averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

104 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an investigation of the transonic flow over a circular arc airfoil was conducted to obtain basic information for turbulence modeling of shock-induced separated flows and to verify numerical computer codes which are being developed to simulate such flows.
Abstract: An investigation of the transonic flow over a circular arc airfoil was conducted to obtain basic information for turbulence modeling of shock-induced separated flows and to verify numerical computer codes which are being developed to simulate such flows. The investigation included the employment of a laser velocimeter to obtain data concerning the mean velocity, the shear stress, and the turbulent kinetic energy profiles in the flowfield downstream of the airfoil midchord where the flow features are more complex. Depending on the free-stream Mach number, the flowfield developed was either steady with shock-wave-induced separation extending from the foot of the shock wave to beyond the trailing edge or unsteady with a periodic motion also undergoing shock-induced separation. The experimental data were compared with the results of numerical simulations in which a computer code was employed that solved the time-dependent Reynolds' averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

77 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a series of compression waves, which develop in the early stages of the flow, strengthen and coalesce into a strong shock wave that moves toward the airfoil leading edge.
Abstract: Conditionally sampled, ensemble-averaged velocity measurements, made with a laser velocimeter, were taken in the flowfield over the rear half of an 18% thick circular arc airfoil at zero incidence tested at M = 0.76 and at a Reynolds number based on chord of 11 x 10(exp 6). Data for one cycle of periodic unsteady flow having a reduced frequency f of 0.49 are analyzed. A series of compression waves, which develop in the early stages of the cycle, strengthen and coalesce into a strong shock wave that moves toward the airfoil leading edge. A thick shear layer forms downstream of the shock wave. The kinetic energy and shear stresses increase dramatically, reach a maximum when dissipation and diffusion of the turbulence exceed production, and then decrease substantially. The response lime of the turbulence to the changes brought about by the shock-wave passage upstream depends on the shock-wave strength and position in the boundary layer. The cycle completes itself when the shock wave passes the midchord, weakens, and the shear layer collapses. Remarkably good comparisons are found with computations that employ the time-dependent Reynolds averaged form of the Navier-Stokes equations using an algebraic eddy viscosity model, developed for steady flows.

29 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1979
TL;DR: In this article, a detailed examination of the turbulent field in an unsteady transonic flow undergoing shock-induced separation is conducted, where ensemble-averaged mean and fluctuating velocities, obtained from conditionally sampled laser velocimeter data, are described and analyzed to assess the applicability of modeling concepts usually employed in steady-flow problems.
Abstract: A detailed examination of the turbulent field in an unsteady transonic flow undergoing shock-induced separation is conducted. Ensemble-averaged mean and fluctuating velocities, obtained from conditionally sampled laser velocimeter data, are described and analyzed to assess the applicability of modeling concepts usually employed in steady-flow problems. Some comparisons with computations employing the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations with a mixing length turbulence model are then presented to illustrate the status of current predictive capabilities. The results appear to imply that turbulence models developed for steady flows apply and that the model need not reflect all the fine details of the turbulent structure but rather account in an approximate way for the production and destruction of the turbulence.

28 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, two new two-equation eddy-viscosity turbulence models are presented, which combine different elements of existing models that are considered superior to their alternatives.
Abstract: Two new two-equation eddy-viscosity turbulence models will be presented. They combine different elements of existing models that are considered superior to their alternatives. The first model, referred to as the baseline (BSL) model, utilizes the original k-ω model of Wilcox in the inner region of the boundary layer and switches to the standard k-e model in the outer region and in free shear flows. It has a performance similar to the Wilcox model, but avoids that model's strong freestream sensitivity

15,459 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a new k -ϵ eddy viscosity model, which consists of a new model dissipation rate equation and a new realizable eddy viscous formulation, is proposed.

4,648 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
06 Jul 1993
TL;DR: In this article, two versions of the k-w two-equation turbulence model are presented, the baseline model and the Shear-Stress Transport (SSn) model.
Abstract: Two new versions of the k - w two-equation turbulence model will be presented. The new Baseline (BSL) model is designed to give results similar to those of the original k - w model of Wilcox. but without its strong dependency on arbitrary freestream values. The BSL model is identical to the Wilcox model in the inner SOC7£; of the boundary-layer but changes gradually to the standard k - f. model (in a k - w fonnulation) towards the boundary-layer edge. The new model is also virtually identical to the k - f. model for free shear layers. The second version of the model is called Shear-Stress Transport (SSn model. It is a variation of the BSL model with the additional ability to account for the transport of the principal turbulent shear stress in adverse pressure gradient boundary-layers. The model is based on Bradshaw's assumption that the principal shear-stress is pro­ portional to the turbulent kinetic energy, which is introduced into the definition of the eddy-viscosity. Both models are tested for a large number of different fiowfields. The results of the BSL model are similar to those of the original k - w model, but without the undesirable free stream dependency. The predictions of the SST model are also independent of the freestrearn values but show better agreement with exper­ imental data for adverse pressure gradient boundary-layer flows.

2,470 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a reformulated version of the author's k-ω model of turbulence has been presented, which has been applied to both boundary layers and free shear flows and has little sensitivity to finite freestream boundary conditions on turbulence properties.
Abstract: This paper presents a reformulated version of the author'sk-ω model of turbulence. Revisions include the addition of just one new closure coefficient and an adjustment to the dependence of eddy viscosity on turbulence properties. The result is a significantly improved model that applies to both boundary layers and free shear flows and that has very little sensitivity to finite freestream boundary conditions on turbulence properties. The improvements to the k-ω model facilitate a significant expansion of its range of applicability. The new model, like preceding versions, provides accurate solutions for mildly separated flows and simple geometries such as that of a backward-facing step. The model's improvement over earlier versions lies in its accuracy for even more complicated separated flows. This paper demonstrates the enhanced capability for supersonic flow into compression corners and a hypersonic shock-wave/ boundary-layer interaction. The excellent agreement is achieved without introducing any compressibility modifications to the turbulence model.

882 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the Kolmogorov velocity scale was introduced to account for the near-wall and low-Reynolds-number effects in both attached and detached flows.

724 citations