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H. T. Banks

Bio: H. T. Banks is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 71 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1987
TL;DR: Theoretical methods for dielectrics with supraconductive boundary and physical modeling for general polarization models are described, as well as methods for acoustically backed dielectric models.
Abstract: Preface 1. Introduction 2. Introduction and physical modeling 3. Wellposedness 4. Computational methods for dielectrics with supraconductive boundary 5. Computational methods for general polarization models 6. Computational methods for acoustically backed dielectrics 7. Concluding summary and remarks of potential applications Bibliography Index.

71 citations


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Banks, V A Bokil and N L Gibson as discussed by the authors analyzed stability and dispersion in a Finite Element Method for Debye and Lorentz Media, 25(4), pp 885-917, July 2009.
Abstract: This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: H T Banks, V A Bokil and N L Gibson, Analysis of Stability and Dispersion in a Finite Element Method for Debye and Lorentz Media, Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations, 25(4), pp 885-917, July 2009, which has been published in final form at http://www3intersciencewileycom/journal/122341241/issue

61 citations

01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: A survey of several recent and emerging ideas and ideas on modeling and system interrogation in the presence of uncertainty that the authors feel have potential for applications related to bioterrorism.
Abstract: In this paper we present a survey of several recent and emerging ideas and e orts on modeling and system interrogation in the presence of uncertainty that we feel have signi cant potential for applications related to bioterrorism. The rst focuses on physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) type models and the e ects of drugs, toxins and viruses on tissue, organs, individuals and populations wherein both intraand inter-individual variability are present when one attempts to determine kinetic rates, susceptibility, eÆcacy of toxins, antitoxins, etc., in aggregate populations. Methods combining deterministic and stochastic concepts are necessary to formulate and computationally solve the associated estimation problems. Similar issues arise in the HIV infectious models we also present below. A second e ort concerns the use of remote electromagnetic interrogation pulses linked to dielectric properties of materials to carry out macroscopic structural imaging of bulk packages (drugs, explosives, etc.) as well as test for presence and levels of toxic chemical compounds in tissue. These techniques also may be useful in functional imaging (e.g., of brain and CNS activity levels) to determine levels of threat in potential adversaries via changes in dielectric properties and conductivity. The PBPK and cellular level virus infectious models we discuss are special examples of a much wider class of population models that one might utilize to investigate potential agents for use in attacks, such as viruses, bacteria, fungi and other chemical, biochemical or radiological agents. These include general epidemiological models such as SIR infectious

54 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors consider electromagnetic interrogation problems for complex materials involving distributions of polarization mechanisms and also distributions for the parameters in these mechanisms, and give theoretical and computational results for specific problems with multiple Debye mechanisms.
Abstract: : We consider electromagnetic interrogation problems for complex materials involving distributions of polarization mechanisms and also distributions for the parameters in these mechanisms. a theoretical and computational framework for such problems is given. Computational results for specific problems with multiple Debye mechanisms are given in the case of discrete, uniform, log-normal, and log-Bi-Gaussian distributions.

46 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The periodic unfolding method for simulating the electromagnetic field in a composite material exhibiting heterogeneous microstructures which are described by spatially periodic parameters is employed.
Abstract: In this paper, we employ the periodic unfolding method for simulating the electromagnetic field in a composite material exhibiting heterogeneous microstructures which are described by spatially periodic parameters. We consider cell problems to calculate the effective parameters for a Debye dielectric medium in the case of a circular microstructure in two dimensions. We assume that the composite materials are quasi-static in nature, i.e., the wavelength of the electromagnetic field is much larger than the relevant dimensions of the microstructure.

43 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors studied the stability properties of higher-order staggered finite difference schemes for Maxwell's equations coupled with a Debye or Lorentz polarization model and derived a closed-form analytical stability condition as a function of the order of the method.
Abstract: We study the stability properties of, and the phase error present in, several higher-order (in space) staggered finite difference schemes for Maxwell’s equations coupled with a Debye or Lorentz polarization model. We present a novel expansion of the symbol of finite difference approximations, of arbitrary (even) order, of the first-order spatial derivative operator. This alternative representation allows the derivation of a concise formula for the numerical dispersion relation for all (even-) order schemes applied to each model, including the limiting (infinite-order) case. We further derive a closed-form analytical stability condition for these schemes as a function of the order of the method. Using representative numerical values for the physical parameters, we validate the stability criterion while quantifying numerical dissipation. Lastly, we demonstrate the effect that the spatial discretization order, and the corresponding stability constraint, has on the dispersion error.

40 citations