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H.V. Emy

Bio: H.V. Emy is an academic researcher from Monash University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Politics. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 6 citations.
Topics: Politics

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
H.V. Emy1
01 May 1972-Politics

6 citations


Cited by
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DissertationDOI
01 Jan 2017
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that Australian constitutionalism is predominantly shaped by two philosophical traditions that can be traced to the founders' decision to combine elements of English and US constitutional thought.
Abstract: The thesis is concerned with understanding the influence of constitutional philosophy on contemporary political practice. The thesis questions whether the Australian polity has an established account of what constitutes the underpinning philosophy of the Constitution and, more importantly, if this philosophical inheritance has any enduring impacts. The thesis refutes claims that Australian constitutionalism is devoid of political philosophy or underpinned by an innate utilitarianism, arguing that the Constitution has a rich and diverse philosophical heritage. More specifically, the thesis contends that Australian constitutionalism is predominantly shaped by two philosophical traditions that can be traced to the founders’ decision to combine elements of English and US constitutional thought. The first three chapters of the thesis discuss how these two traditions shaped the development of the Constitution, contributing to Australian understandings of critical constitutional concepts such as the separation of powers, the foundations of national sovereignty and the best mechanism to secure individual rights. Furthermore, by tracing the philosophical origins of the Constitution, the thesis shows that the two predominant influences on the development of Australian government are often at theoretical tension. Having established the Constitution’s rich and diverse philosophical heritage, the thesis then attempts to understand if the theoretical tensions in Australian constitutionalism manifest in contemporary political practice.

22 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines how contributors to the Australian Journal of Political Science (AJPS) have conceptualized Australian politics over 50 years and examines key events in Australian politics that prompted vigorous debate.
Abstract: This article examines how contributors to the Australian Journal of Political Science (AJPS) have conceptualised Australian politics over 50 years. It undertakes this task by examining key events in Australian politics that prompted vigorous debate. These include the election of the Whitlam government in 1972, its dismissal in 1975, and how this in turn generated discussion about the nature of responsible government in Australia. The republican debate of the 1990s shifted the focus. Since 2000, however, a few contributors to the journal have attempted to find a central focus for Australian politics in the controversy over the idea of the Australian settlement. Much recent discussion about Australian politics has been influenced by the ‘cultural turn’, and become particularistic. It is argued that despite their diversity, articles in the AJPS generally do not usually contribute to a narrative that sheds light on the larger, longstanding, structural issues of Australian politics.

7 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 May 1975-Politics
TL;DR: The role of the Australian country party in the tripartism in Australia is discussed in this article, where the authors focus on the role of women in the three-party system.
Abstract: (1975). Tri‐partism in Australia: The role of the Australian country party. Politics: Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 1-14.

6 citations