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Hagop M. Kantarjian

Bio: Hagop M. Kantarjian is a academic researcher at University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center who has co-authored 3708 publication(s) receiving 210208 citation(s). The author has an hindex of 204. Previous affiliations of Hagop M. Kantarjian include Rice University & University of Chicago. The author has done significant research in the topic(s): Myeloid leukemia & Imatinib mesylate.

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Topics: Myeloid leukemia, Imatinib mesylate, Leukemia ... show more
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3,708 results found


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1056/NEJM200104053441401
Brian J. Druker1, Moshe Talpaz2, Debra Resta3, Bin Peng3  +7 moreInstitutions (4)
Abstract: Background BCR-ABL is a constitutively activated tyrosine kinase that causes chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Since tyrosine kinase activity is essential to the transforming function of BCR-ABL, an inhibitor of the kinase could be an effective treatment for CML. Methods We conducted a phase 1, dose-escalating trial of STI571 (formerly known as CGP 57148B), a specific inhibitor of the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase. STI571 was administered orally to 83 patients with CML in the chronic phase in whom treatment with interferon alfa had failed. Patients were successively assigned to 1 of 14 doses ranging from 25 to 1000 mg per day. Results Adverse effects of STI571 were minimal; the most common were nausea, myalgias, edema, and diarrhea. A maximal tolerated dose was not identified. Complete hematologic responses were observed in 53 of 54 patients treated with daily doses of 300 mg or more and typically occurred in the first four weeks of therapy. Of the 54 patients treated with doses of 300 mg or more, cytogenetic res...

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Topics: Imatinib (58%), Imatinib mesylate (58%), Myeloid leukemia (57%) ... show more

4,849 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1056/NEJMOA1301689
Timothy J. Ley1, Christopher A. Miller1, Li Ding1, Benjamin J. Raphael2  +135 moreInstitutions (15)
Abstract: BACKGROUND—Many mutations that contribute to the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are undefined The relationships between patterns of mutations and epigenetic phenotypes are not yet clear METHODS—We analyzed the genomes of 200 clinically annotated adult cases of de novo AML, using either whole-genome sequencing (50 cases) or whole-exome sequencing (150 cases), along with RNA and microRNA sequencing and DNA-methylation analysis RESULTS—AML genomes have fewer mutations than most other adult cancers, with an average of only 13 mutations found in genes Of these, an average of 5 are in genes that are recurrently mutated in AML A total of 23 genes were significantly mutated, and another 237 were mutated in two or more samples Nearly all samples had at least 1 nonsynonymous mutation in one of nine categories of genes that are almost certainly relevant for pathogenesis, including transcriptionfactor fusions (18% of cases), the gene encoding nucleophosmin (NPM1) (27%), tumorsuppressor genes (16%), DNA-methylation–related genes (44%), signaling genes (59%), chromatin-modifying genes (30%), myeloid transcription-factor genes (22%), cohesin-complex genes (13%), and spliceosome-complex genes (14%) Patterns of cooperation and mutual exclusivity suggested strong biologic relationships among several of the genes and categories CONCLUSIONS—We identified at least one potential driver mutation in nearly all AML samples and found that a complex interplay of genetic events contributes to AML pathogenesis in individual patients The databases from this study are widely available to serve as a foundation for further investigations of AML pathogenesis, classification, and risk stratification (Funded by the National Institutes of Health) The molecular pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been studied with the use of cytogenetic analysis for more than three decades Recurrent chromosomal structural variations are well established as diagnostic and prognostic markers, suggesting that acquired genetic abnormalities (ie, somatic mutations) have an essential role in pathogenesis 1,2 However, nearly 50% of AML samples have a normal karyotype, and many of these genomes lack structural abnormalities, even when assessed with high-density comparative genomic hybridization or single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays 3-5 (see Glossary) Targeted sequencing has identified recurrent mutations in FLT3, NPM1, KIT, CEBPA, and TET2 6-8 Massively parallel sequencing enabled the discovery of recurrent mutations in DNMT3A 9,10 and IDH1 11 Recent studies have shown that many patients with

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Topics: Enasidenib (57%), Massive parallel sequencing (55%), KMT2A (54%) ... show more

3,313 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1056/NEJMOA022457
Abstract: Background Imatinib, a selective inhibitor of the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase, produces high response rates in patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) who have had no response to interferon alfa. We compared the efficacy of imatinib with that of interferon alfa combined with low-dose cytarabine in newly diagnosed chronic-phase CML. Methods We randomly assigned 1106 patients to receive imatinib (553 patients) or interferon alfa plus low-dose cytarabine (553 patients). Crossover to the alternative group was allowed if stringent criteria defining treatment failure or intolerance were met. Patients were evaluated for hematologic and cytogenetic responses, toxic effects, and rates of progression. Results After a median follow-up of 19 months, the estimated rate of a major cytogenetic response (0 to 35 percent of cells in metaphase positive for the Philadelphia chromosome) at 18 months was 87.1 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 84.1 to 90.0) in the imatinib group and 34.7 percent (95 perce...

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Topics: Nilotinib (64%), Imatinib mesylate (62%), Interferon alfa (62%) ... show more

3,256 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1056/NEJMOA062867
Abstract: BACKGROUND: The cause of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a constitutively active BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase. Imatinib inhibits this kinase, and in a short-term study was superior to interferon alfa ...

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Topics: Myeloid leukemia (69%), Nilotinib (68%), Imatinib mesylate (67%) ... show more

3,169 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1056/NEJM200104053441402
Abstract: Background BCR-ABL, a constitutively activated tyrosine kinase, is the product of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. This enzyme is present in virtually all cases of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) throughout the course of the disease, and in 20 percent of cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). On the basis of the substantial activity of the inhibitor in patients in the chronic phase, we evaluated STI571 (formerly known as CGP 57148B), a specific inhibitor of the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase, in patients who had CML in blast crisis and in patients with Ph-chromosome–positive ALL. Methods In this dose-escalating pilot study, 58 patients were treated with STI571; 38 patients had myeloid blast crisis and 20 had ALL or lymphoid blast crisis. Treatment was given orally at daily doses ranging from 300 to 1000 mg. Results Responses occurred in 21 of 38 patients (55 percent) with a myeloid-blast-crisis phenotype; 4 of these 21 patients had a complete hematologic response. Of 20 patients with lymphoid blast crisis ...

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2,673 Citations


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89,745 results found



Open accessBook
29 Sep 2017-
Abstract: WHO CLASSIFICATION OF TUMOURS OF HAEMATOPOIETIC AND LYMPHOID TISSUES , WHO CLASSIFICATION OF TUMOURS OF HAEMATOPOIETIC AND LYMPHOID TISSUES , کتابخانه مرکزی دانشگاه علوم پزشکی تهران

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12,924 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3322/CAAC.21387
Abstract: Each year, the American Cancer Society estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths that will occur in the United States in the current year and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival. Incidence data were collected by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program; the National Program of Cancer Registries; and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Mortality data were collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. In 2017, 1,688,780 new cancer cases and 600,920 cancer deaths are projected to occur in the United States. For all sites combined, the cancer incidence rate is 20% higher in men than in women, while the cancer death rate is 40% higher. However, sex disparities vary by cancer type. For example, thyroid cancer incidence rates are 3-fold higher in women than in men (21 vs 7 per 100,000 population), despite equivalent death rates (0.5 per 100,000 population), largely reflecting sex differences in the "epidemic of diagnosis." Over the past decade of available data, the overall cancer incidence rate (2004-2013) was stable in women and declined by approximately 2% annually in men, while the cancer death rate (2005-2014) declined by about 1.5% annually in both men and women. From 1991 to 2014, the overall cancer death rate dropped 25%, translating to approximately 2,143,200 fewer cancer deaths than would have been expected if death rates had remained at their peak. Although the cancer death rate was 15% higher in blacks than in whites in 2014, increasing access to care as a result of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act may expedite the narrowing racial gap; from 2010 to 2015, the proportion of blacks who were uninsured halved, from 21% to 11%, as it did for Hispanics (31% to 16%). Gains in coverage for traditionally underserved Americans will facilitate the broader application of existing cancer control knowledge across every segment of the population. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:7-30. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

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Topics: Cancer Death Rate (74%), Mortality rate (63%), Cancer (59%) ... show more

12,284 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3322/CAAC.21551
Abstract: Each year, the American Cancer Society estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths that will occur in the United States and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival. Incidence data, available through 2015, were collected by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program; the National Program of Cancer Registries; and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Mortality data, available through 2016, were collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. In 2019, 1,762,450 new cancer cases and 606,880 cancer deaths are projected to occur in the United States. Over the past decade of data, the cancer incidence rate (2006-2015) was stable in women and declined by approximately 2% per year in men, whereas the cancer death rate (2007-2016) declined annually by 1.4% and 1.8%, respectively. The overall cancer death rate dropped continuously from 1991 to 2016 by a total of 27%, translating into approximately 2,629,200 fewer cancer deaths than would have been expected if death rates had remained at their peak. Although the racial gap in cancer mortality is slowly narrowing, socioeconomic inequalities are widening, with the most notable gaps for the most preventable cancers. For example, compared with the most affluent counties, mortality rates in the poorest counties were 2-fold higher for cervical cancer and 40% higher for male lung and liver cancers during 2012-2016. Some states are home to both the wealthiest and the poorest counties, suggesting the opportunity for more equitable dissemination of effective cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment strategies. A broader application of existing cancer control knowledge with an emphasis on disadvantaged groups would undoubtedly accelerate progress against cancer.

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Topics: Cancer Death Rate (71%), Cancer prevention (66%), Mortality rate (60%) ... show more

11,980 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3322/CAAC.21442
Abstract: Each year, the American Cancer Society estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths that will occur in the United States and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival. Incidence data, available through 2014, were collected by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program; the National Program of Cancer Registries; and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Mortality data, available through 2015, were collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. In 2018, 1,735,350 new cancer cases and 609,640 cancer deaths are projected to occur in the United States. Over the past decade of data, the cancer incidence rate (2005-2014) was stable in women and declined by approximately 2% annually in men, while the cancer death rate (2006-2015) declined by about 1.5% annually in both men and women. The combined cancer death rate dropped continuously from 1991 to 2015 by a total of 26%, translating to approximately 2,378,600 fewer cancer deaths than would have been expected if death rates had remained at their peak. Of the 10 leading causes of death, only cancer declined from 2014 to 2015. In 2015, the cancer death rate was 14% higher in non-Hispanic blacks (NHBs) than non-Hispanic whites (NHWs) overall (death rate ratio [DRR], 1.14; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.13-1.15), but the racial disparity was much larger for individuals aged <65 years (DRR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.29-1.32) compared with those aged ≥65 years (DRR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.06-1.09) and varied substantially by state. For example, the cancer death rate was lower in NHBs than NHWs in Massachusetts for all ages and in New York for individuals aged ≥65 years, whereas for those aged <65 years, it was 3 times higher in NHBs in the District of Columbia (DRR, 2.89; 95% CI, 2.16-3.91) and about 50% higher in Wisconsin (DRR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.56-2.02), Kansas (DRR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.25-1.81), Louisiana (DRR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.38-1.60), Illinois (DRR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.39-1.57), and California (DRR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.38-1.54). Larger racial inequalities in young and middle-aged adults probably partly reflect less access to high-quality health care. CA Cancer J Clin 2018;68:7-30. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

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Topics: Cancer Death Rate (63%), Mortality rate (56%)

11,946 Citations


Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Author in previous years
YearPapers
2021110
2020132
2019164
2018174
2017203
2016190

Top Attributes

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Author's top 5 most impactful journals

Blood

1.3K papers, 66.1K citations

Journal of Clinical Oncology

400 papers, 20.8K citations

Cancer

300 papers, 18K citations

Leukemia

157 papers, 9.3K citations

Clinical Lymphoma, Myeloma & Leukemia

148 papers, 2.4K citations

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