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Author

Haibo Feng

Other affiliations: Northumbria University
Bio: Haibo Feng is an academic researcher from University of British Columbia. The author has contributed to research in topics: Life-cycle assessment & China. The author has an hindex of 9, co-authored 20 publications receiving 349 citations. Previous affiliations of Haibo Feng include Northumbria University.

Papers
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TL;DR: Wang et al. as discussed by the authors provided a MCDM approach to assess and rank the resilience of 187 smart cities in China and found that the overall resilience of smart cities is at a relatively low level.

117 citations

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TL;DR: In this paper, a comparative lifecycle assessment (LCA) of three living wall systems: trellis system, planter box system, and felt layer system is presented.

100 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, a comparative life cycle assessment (LCA) of traditional and emerging treatment approaches for hazardous refinery oily sludge handling is presented, and two emerging energy recovery approaches, including solvent extraction and pyrolysis, are investigated.

90 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, the authors analyzed the energy performance of green vegetation in a high occupancy LEED Gold standard building in Canada and concluded that green vegetation could considerably reduce the negative heat transfer through the building facade in summer and winter months.

80 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, a scenario-based analysis approach was taken to evaluate the life cycle GHG emissions of six different renovation and reconstruction scenarios in a densely populated urban centre in British Columbia, Canada.

57 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 2020
TL;DR: Prolonged viral shedding provides the rationale for a strategy of isolation of infected patients and optimal antiviral interventions in the future.
Abstract: Summary Background Since December, 2019, Wuhan, China, has experienced an outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients with COVID-19 have been reported but risk factors for mortality and a detailed clinical course of illness, including viral shedding, have not been well described. Methods In this retrospective, multicentre cohort study, we included all adult inpatients (≥18 years old) with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from Jinyintan Hospital and Wuhan Pulmonary Hospital (Wuhan, China) who had been discharged or had died by Jan 31, 2020. Demographic, clinical, treatment, and laboratory data, including serial samples for viral RNA detection, were extracted from electronic medical records and compared between survivors and non-survivors. We used univariable and multivariable logistic regression methods to explore the risk factors associated with in-hospital death. Findings 191 patients (135 from Jinyintan Hospital and 56 from Wuhan Pulmonary Hospital) were included in this study, of whom 137 were discharged and 54 died in hospital. 91 (48%) patients had a comorbidity, with hypertension being the most common (58 [30%] patients), followed by diabetes (36 [19%] patients) and coronary heart disease (15 [8%] patients). Multivariable regression showed increasing odds of in-hospital death associated with older age (odds ratio 1·10, 95% CI 1·03–1·17, per year increase; p=0·0043), higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (5·65, 2·61–12·23; p Interpretation The potential risk factors of older age, high SOFA score, and d-dimer greater than 1 μg/mL could help clinicians to identify patients with poor prognosis at an early stage. Prolonged viral shedding provides the rationale for a strategy of isolation of infected patients and optimal antiviral interventions in the future. Funding Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Innovation Fund for Medical Sciences; National Science Grant for Distinguished Young Scholars; National Key Research and Development Program of China; The Beijing Science and Technology Project; and Major Projects of National Science and Technology on New Drug Creation and Development.

4,408 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, a review on three streams of life cycle studies that have been frequently applied to evaluate the environmental impacts of building construction with a major focus on whether they can be used for decision making is provided.

547 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, the concept of green roofs and facades is comprehensively analyzed in a holistic and thematic way, and the results achieved from the literature survey clearly indicate that green roofs are key solutions to mitigate building-related energy consumptions and greenhouse gas emissions in a renewable, sustainable, energyefficient and cost effective way.
Abstract: Based on United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), building sector accounts for 40% of total energy consumption. In European countries, 36% of total greenhouse gas emissions is attributed to buildings. In this respect, green roofs are considered to be one of the most appropriate sustainable solutions to resolve the urban heat island-related issues. Roofs account for nearly 20–25% of overall urban surface areas. Energy saving, thermal insulation, shading and evapotranspiration features highlight the key role of green roofs in overall thermal performance of buildings and microclimatic conditions of indoor environments. Within the scope of this research, the concept of green roofs and facades is comprehensively analysed in a holistic and thematic way. Following a historical overview of the technology, the research is split into various subfields such as energy saving in buildings through greenery systems, multifunctional thermal benefits including evapotranspiration, thermal insulation, shading and thermal comfort features, evaporative cooling for reducing cooling demand and minimising wind driven convection losses. The results achieved from the literature survey clearly indicate that green roofs and facades are key solutions to mitigate building-related energy consumptions and greenhouse gas emissions. According to the previous works, heat flow through the building roofs in summer can be reduced by approximately 80% via green roofs. The green roofs are reported to consume less energy in the range of 2.2–16.7% than traditional roofs during summer time. A similar tendency is observed for the winter season depending on regional and climatic conditions. The temperature difference between conventional and greens roofs in winter is found to be about 4 °C, which is remarkable. Energy demand of buildings in summer is highly dependent on the plant intensity as it is reported to be 23.6, 12.3 and 8.2 kWh/m2/year for extensive, semi-intensive and intensive greenery surface, respectively. Greenery systems are also capable of providing thermally comfortable indoor and outdoor conditions. It is underlined that the annual average accumulation of CO2 reaches the level of 13.41–97.03 kg carbon/m2 for 98 m2 of vertical greenery system. The results of this research can be useful for dwellers, builders, architects, engineers and policy makers to have a good understanding about the potential of green roofs and facades to mitigate building-related energy consumptions and carbon emissions in a renewable, sustainable, energy-efficient and cost effective way.

301 citations

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TL;DR: The findings highlight that although the techno driven approach may be more productive to identify, isolate and quarantine infected individuals, it also results in the suppression and censoring the citizen views.

175 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, a comprehensive technical review of passive wall systems in building envelopes while discussing their respective capabilities in optimizing energy efficiency is presented. But, the authors do not consider the impact of the passive wall system on the overall building environment.
Abstract: The building sector accounts for approximately 40% of total global energy usage. Energy consumption for space heating and cooling makes up 60% of the total consumed energy in buildings. This paper presents a comprehensive technical review of passive wall systems in building envelopes while discussing their respective capabilities in optimizing energy efficiency. Different types of energy efficient walls such as Trombe Walls, Autoclaved Aerated Concrete Walls, Double Skin Walls, and Green Walls are explored. Furthermore, novel concepts for optimizing energy efficiency in building envelopes are also introduced. Finally the utilization of passive wall systems to save energy while improving the building environmental impacts is discussed.

173 citations