scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Halil Inalcik

Other affiliations: University of Chicago
Bio: Halil Inalcik is an academic researcher from Ankara University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Social history & Political history. The author has an hindex of 20, co-authored 62 publications receiving 2221 citations. Previous affiliations of Halil Inalcik include University of Chicago.


Papers
More filters
Book
01 Jan 1997
TL;DR: Inalcik and Quataert as discussed by the authors presented a Chronology of Ottoman history, 1260-1923, with a focus on the economic mind of the Ottoman state.
Abstract: List of maps List of figures List of tables Genealogy of the Ottoman dynasty Chronology of Ottoman history, 1260-1923 Preface List of abbreviations General maps General introduction Halil Inalcik and Donald Quataert Part I: The Ottoman State: Economy and Society, 1300-1600 Halil Inalcik Introduction A. The economic mind B. State revenues and expenditures: 1. Sources of revenue 2. The state treasury and budgets C. State, land and peasant: 3. State-owned lands (miri) 4. Land possession outside the miri system 5. Land surveying 6. The cift-hane system: the organization of Ottoman rural society 7. Settlements D. Trade: 8. Istanbul and the imperial economy 9. International trade: general conditions 10. Bursa and the silk trade 11. Dubrovnik and the Balkans 12. The Black Sea and Eastern Europe 13. The India trade 14. Northerners in the Mediterranean Bibliography List of weights and measures Glossary Index.

378 citations

Book
01 Jan 1973

216 citations

Book
01 Jan 1994
TL;DR: The story of the Ottoman Empire's growth into a vast Middle Eastern Power is described in this article, where the author gives a striking picture of the prominence of religion and warfare in everyday life as well as the traditions of statecraft, administration, social values, financial and land policies.
Abstract: Covering the greatest three centuries of Turkish history, this book tells the story of the Ottoman Empire's growth into a vast Middle Eastern Power. Born as a military frontier principality at the turn of the Fourteenth century, Turkey developed into the dominant force in Anatolia and the Balkans, growing to become the most powerful Islamic state after 1517 when it incorporated the old Arab lands. This distinctively Eastern culture, with all its detail and intricacies, is explored here by a pre-eminent scholar of Turkish history. He gives a striking picture of the prominence of religion and warfare in everyday life as well as the traditions of statecraft, administration, social values, financial and land policies. The definitive account, this is an indispensable companion to anyone with an interest in Islam, Turkey and the Balkans.

208 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The economic system of the Ottoman Empire and its basic economic principles derived from a traditional view of state and society which had prevailed since antiquity in the empires of the Near East.
Abstract: The economic system of the Ottoman Empire and its basic economic principles derived from a traditional view of state and society which had prevailed since antiquity in the empires of the Near East. This theory, since it determined the attitude and policy of the administrators, was of considerable practical importance.

205 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article found that married women have lower hourly earnings than married men with the same market human capital, and they economize on the effort expended on market work by seeking less demanding jobs.
Abstract: Increasing returns from specialized human capital is a powerful force creating a division of labor in the allocation of time and investments in human capital between married men and married women. Moreover, since child care and housework are more effort intensive than leisure and other household activities, married women spend less effort on each hour of market work than married men working the same number of hours. Hence, married women have lower hourly earnings than married men with the same market human capital, and they economize on the effort expended on market work by seeking less demanding jobs. The responsibility of married women for child care and housework has major implications for earnings and occupational differences between men and women.

2,190 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a preliminary investigation shows that there remain substantial divergences between IBF's ideals and its practices, and much of IBF still remains functionally indistinguishable from conventional banking.
Abstract: Islamic Banks hold well over US $700 billion in assets and are growing at over 15% p.a. Islamic Banking and Finance (IBF) involves wider ethical and moral issues than simply ‘interest-free’ transactions. Its advocates argue that these make it more economically efficient than conventional banking and promote greater economic equity and justice. To what extent, then, do actual Islamic Banking practices live up to the ideal, and how different are they from conventional banking? A preliminary investigation shows that, three decades after its introduction, there remain substantial divergences between IBF's ideals and its practices, and much of IBF still remains functionally indistinguishable from conventional banking. This runs counter to claims by IBF advocates that it would rapidly differentiate itself from conventional banking. However, despite not providing an alternative to conventional banking and finance, IBF does strengthen a distinctly Islamic identity by providing the appropriate Islamic terminology for de facto conventional financial transactions.

563 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article used a border specification and a two-dimensional geographic regression discontinuity design to identify from individuals living within a restricted band around the former border and found that historical Habsburg affiliation increases current trust and reduces corruption in courts and police.
Abstract: We hypothesise that the Habsburg Empire with its well-respected administration increased citizens’ trust in local public services. In several Eastern European countries, communities on both sides of the long-gone Habsburg border have shared common formal institutions for a century now. We use a border specification and a two-dimensional geographic regression discontinuity design to identify from individuals living within a restricted band around the former border. We find that historical Habsburg affiliation increases current trust and reduces corruption in courts and police. Falsification tests of spuriously moved borders, geographic and pre-existing differences and interpersonal trust corroborate a genuine Habsburg effect.

412 citations

Book
Karen Barkey1
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: Barkey as discussed by the authors examines the Ottoman Empire's social organization and mechanisms of rule at key moments of its history, emergence, imperial institutionalization, remodeling, and transition to nation state, revealing how the empire managed these moments, adapted, and averted crises and what changes made it transform dramatically.
Abstract: This book is a comparative study of imperial organization and longevity that assesses Ottoman successes as well as failures against those of other empires with similar characteristics. Barkey examines the Ottoman Empire's social organization and mechanisms of rule at key moments of its history, emergence, imperial institutionalization, remodeling, and transition to nation-state, revealing how the empire managed these moments, adapted, and averted crises and what changes made it transform dramatically. The flexible techniques by which the Ottomans maintained their legitimacy, the cooperation of their diverse elites both at the center and in the provinces, as well as their control over economic and human resources were responsible for the longevity of this particular 'negotiated empire'. Her analysis illuminates topics that include imperial governance, imperial institutions, imperial diversity and multiculturalism, the manner in which dissent is handled and/or internalized, and the nature of state society negotiations.

393 citations

Book
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: Theoretical explorations: 1. Compromise and closure: a theory of social dynamics 2. State Building and Ethnic Conflict: 3. Who owns the state? Ethnic conflicts after the end of empires 4. Nationalism and ethnic mobilisation in Mexico 5. The Politics of Exclusion in Nationalised States: 6. Racism and xenophobia 7. Nationalising multi-ethnic Switzerland as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Introduction Part I. Theoretical Explorations: 1. Compromise and closure: a theory of social dynamics 2. The making of modern communities Part II. State Building and Ethnic Conflict: 3. Who owns the state? Ethnic conflicts after the end of empires 4. Nationalism and ethnic mobilisation in Mexico 5. From empire to ethnocracy. Iraq since the Ottomans Part III. The Politics of Exclusion in Nationalised States: 6. Racism and xenophobia 7. Nationalising multi-ethnic Switzerland.

375 citations