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Author

Hannes Palang

Other affiliations: University of Tartu
Bio: Hannes Palang is an academic researcher from Tallinn University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Cultural landscape & Landscape archaeology. The author has an hindex of 22, co-authored 76 publications receiving 1738 citations. Previous affiliations of Hannes Palang include University of Tartu.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors review and synthesize findings from six important areas of landscape research in Europe and discuss how these findings may advance the study of ecosystem change and society and its thematic key priorities: linkages between people and the environment in landscapes, landscape structure and land-use intensity, long-term landscape history, driving forces, processes and actors of landscape change, landscape values and meanings, and landscape stewardship.
Abstract: Landscapes are closely linked to human well-being, but they are undergoing rapid and fundamental change. Understanding the societal transformation underlying these landscape changes, as well as the ecological and societal outcomes of landscape transformations across scales are prime areas for landscape research. We review and synthesize findings from six important areas of landscape research in Europe and discuss how these findings may advance the study of ecosystem change and society and its thematic key priorities. These six areas are: (1) linkages between people and the environment in landscapes, (2) landscape structure and land-use intensity, (3) long-term landscape history, (4) driving forces, processes, and actors of landscape change, (5) landscape values and meanings, and (6) landscape stewardship. We propose that these knowledge areas can contribute to the study of ecosystem change and society, considering nested multiscale dynamics of social-ecological systems; the stewardship of these systems and their ecosystem services; and the relationships between ecosystem services, human well-being, wealth, and poverty. Our synthesis highlights that knowledge about past and current landscape patterns, processes, and dynamics provides guidance for developing visions to support the sustainable stewardship of social-ecological systems under future conditions.

132 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that Central and Eastern European landscapes are much more diverse in time (layers) than Western European ones, and that this diversity reduces the readability of landscapes, creating miscommunication and a transformation of meanings.
Abstract: Interactions between nature and man – the underlying forces in landscape – have over time caused diversity. Usually, geographers and landscape ecologists deal with spatial diversity; in this paper, we would like to also consider temporal diversity. We argue that Central and Eastern European landscapes (using the examples of Estonia, Hungary, Poland and Slovenia) are much more diverse in time (layers) than Western European ones. This difference requires the use of different indicators in order to measure and study landscapes and special problems, threats, and possibilities of management and future development – but most important is the consideration of different perceptions. We also show that this diversity reduces the readability of landscapes, creating miscommunication and a transformation of meanings. We further argue that the link between humans and landscape is lost in Central and Eastern European countries due to temporal diversity, and that this link will be created anew in a globalizing world. To overcome alienation, we need slightly different classifications/typologies for each country in this region, with the aim of a sound future management of cultural landscapes.

131 citations

Book
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, a comparative study on trees and hedgerows in Japan and England is presented, where the concept of cultural landscape: discourse and narratives M. Jones et al. discuss the role of cultural values in modern landscapes.
Abstract: Contributing Authors. Preface. Landscape interfaces H. Palang, G. Fry. Landscape: ecology and semiosis D. Cosgrove. The concept of cultural landscape: discourse and narratives M. Jones. A comparative study on trees and hedgerows in Japan and England K. Fukamachi, H. Oku, O. Rackham. Transformations of cultural landscape: the case of the Polish-Ukranian borderland E. Skowronek, R. Krukowska, A. Swieca. The role of cultural values in modern landscapes: the Flemish example M. Antrop. Shaping the future of a cultural landscape: the Douro Valley wine region T. Andresen, M.J. Curado. Cultural and historical values in landscape planning: local's perception H. Alumae, A. Printsmann, H. Palang. Stakeholder landscapes and GIS: institutional visions of landscape and sustainability in the management of the Sherwood Natural Area, UK R. Fish, R. Haines-Young, J. Rubiano. An aboriginal planning initiative: sacred knowledge and landscape suitability analysis M. Cantwell, C.W. Adams. Communicating landscape development plans through scenario visualization techniques B. Tress, G. Tress. Historical cadstral maps as a tool for valuation of today's landscape elements. S.T. Domas, I. Austad, J. A. Timberlid, A. Norderhaug. From objects to landscapes in natural and cultural heritage management: a role for landscape interfaces G. Fry. Landscape archaeology and management of ancient cultural heritage sites: Some notes based on Finnish experiences P. Maaranen. Pressure on the fringe of the cities G. Swensen. The long chain archaeology, historical landscape characterization and time depth in the landscape G. Fairclough. Authenticity in landscape conservation and management the importance of the local context R. Gustavsson, A. Peterson. Combining approaches in landscape research:the case of Saaremaa, Estonia H. Soovali, H. Palang, E. Kaur, T. Peil, I. Vermandere. Landscape a matter of identity and integrity: towards sound knowledge, awareness and involvement J.D.van Mansvelt, B. Pedroli. Learning from Tartu towards post-postmodern landscapes J.S. Jauhiainen.

128 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the permanence of persistence and change in rural landscapes, and the role of agriculture in rural communities and the human factor in the preservation of rural landscapes.
Abstract: Contributing Authors Preface The Permanence of Persistence and Change.- The Languages of Rural Landscapes.- 'This Is Not a Landscape': Circulating Reference and Land Shaping.- Naming and Claiming Discourse.- Between Insideness and Outsideness - Studying Locals' Perceptions of Landscape.- Landscape Consumption in Otepaa, Estonia.- Countryside Imagery in Finnish National Discourse.- Religious Places - Changing Meanings. The Case of Saaremaa Island, Estonia.- Of Oaks, Erratic Boulders, and Milkmaids.- The Border and the Bordered.- A Hidden World? A Gendered Perspective on Swedish Historical Maps.- When Sweden Was Put on the Map.- Tycho Brahe, Cartography and Landscape in 16th Century Scandinavia.- New Money and theLand Market.- The Landscape of Vittskovle Estate - At the Crossroads of Feudalism and Modernity.- Greens, Commons and Shifting Power Relations in Flanders.- Enclosure Landscapes in the Uplands of England and Wales.- Land Purchase and the Survival of Swedish Ethnicity in Estonia.- The Dynamics of Property Rights in Post-Communist East Germany.- Different Methods for the Protection of Cultural Landscapes.- The Significance of the Dutch GIS Histlands.- The Future Role of Agriculture in Rural Communities.- Danish Farmers and the Cultural Environment.- The Human Factor in Biodiversity.- Diversity of Estonian Coastal Landscapes: Past and Future.- Management Strategies in Forest Landscapes in Norway.- Past Landscape Use as an Ecological Influence on the Actual Environment.- Can Landscapes Be Read?.- The Permanent Conference and the Study of the Rural Landscape

115 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the analysis of maps from four different time periods in terms of 12 diversity indicators shows that landscape diversity changes in Estonia are minor and still there remain some regional differences.

87 citations


Cited by
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Book Chapter
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: In this article, Jacobi describes the production of space poetry in the form of a poetry collection, called Imagine, Space Poetry, Copenhagen, 1996, unpaginated and unedited.
Abstract: ‘The Production of Space’, in: Frans Jacobi, Imagine, Space Poetry, Copenhagen, 1996, unpaginated.

7,238 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: This article argued that narrative is a solution to a problem of general human concern, namely, the problem of how to translate knowing into telling, and fashioning human experience into a form assimilable to structures of meaning that are generally human rather than culture-specific.
Abstract: To raise the question of the nature of narrative is to invite reflection on the very nature of culture and, possibly, even on the nature of humanity itself. So natural is the impulse to narrate, so inevitable is the form of narrative for any report of the way things really happened, that narrativity could appear problematical only in a culture in which it was absent-absent or, as in some domains of contemporary Western intellectual and artistic culture, programmatically refused. As a panglobal fact of culture, narrative and narration are less problems than simply data. As the late (and already profoundly missed) Roland Barthes remarked, narrative "is simply there like life itself. . international, transhistorical, transcultural."' Far from being a problem, then, narrative might well be considered a solution to a problem of general human concern, namely, the problem of how to translate knowing into telling,2 the problem of fashioning human experience into a form assimilable to structures of meaning that are generally human rather than culture-specific. We may not be able fully to comprehend specific thought patterns of another culture, but we have relatively less difficulty understanding a story coming from another culture, however exotic that

1,640 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

1,211 citations

23 Mar 2010
TL;DR: In this article, the authors analyse les relations conceptuelles (imprecises) de la vulnerabilite, de la resilience and de la capacite d'adaptation aux changements climatiques selon le systeme socioecologique (socio-ecologigal systems -SES) afin de comprendre and anticiper le comportement des composantes sociales et ecologiques du systeme.
Abstract: Cet article analyse les relations conceptuelles (imprecises) de la vulnerabilite, de la resilience et de la capacite d’adaptation aux changements climatiques selon le systeme socio-ecologique (socio-ecologigal systems – SES) afin de comprendre et anticiper le comportement des composantes sociales et ecologiques du systeme. Une serie de questions est proposee par l’auteur sur la specification de ces termes afin de developper une structure conceptuelle qui inclut les dimensions naturelles et so...

1,133 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Creative City as discussed by the authors is a classic and has been republished many times, aiming to make readers feel: "I can do that too" and to spread confidence that creative and innovative solutions to urban problems are feasible however bad they may seem at first sight.
Abstract: The Creative City is now a classic and has been republished many times. It is an ambitious book and a clarion call for imaginative action in running urban life. It seeks to inspire people to think, plan and act imaginatively in the city and to get an ideas factory going that turns urban innovations into reality. Its aim is to make readers feel: ‘I can do that too’ and to spread confidence that creative and innovative solutions to urban problems are feasible however bad they may seem at first sight.

870 citations