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Author

Harold D. Nelson

Bio: Harold D. Nelson is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 3 publications receiving 83 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1979

43 citations

Book
01 Jan 1978

24 citations

Book
01 Jan 1979

17 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Oct 1988
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors assess the effects of oil windfalls on six developing countries, and conclude that much of the potential benefit of the windfalls, has been dissipated, and explain why some oil producers may have ended up actually worse off, despite the additional revenue.
Abstract: The oil booms of 1973 and 1979 brought unprecedented income to many, previously poor oil-producing countries. What became of their new-found wealth? In this comparative study, the author assesses for the first time, the effects of oil windfalls on six developing countries. He presents new information on how these petroleum exporters, used their oil revenue, and analyzes the consequences of government policies. He concludes that much of the potential benefit of the windfalls, has been dissipated, and, explains why some oil producers may have ended up actually worse off, despite the additional revenue. Although this issue has been previously discussed, especially anecdotally, it has not been systematically analyzed, and related to the economic policies of particular countries, and their macroeconomic characteristics. In this comparative analysis of six oil-exporting countries - the core of the book - the author blends institutional, and political aspects, with the quantitative results derived from a complex economic model, including individual country studies. The author suggests that natural resources alone will do little to promote economic development. Countries need sound economic management, and need to address the political factors that conflict with wise policy choices. Market processes are needed to help allocate public resources, and, governments and others responsible must take account of risk, and uncertainty when selecting projects, and formulating plans for development.

895 citations

BookDOI
21 Aug 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the authors thank the Centro de Estudios Avanzados en Ciencias Sociales at the Juan March Institute in Madrid, and the EITM Summer Instsitute at Berkeley for providing stimulating audiences for earlier versions of this paper.
Abstract: Acknowledgements: The authors thank the Centro de Estudios Avanzados en Ciencias Sociales at the Juan March Institute in Madrid (and its director, Jose Maria Maravall), and the EITM Summer Instsitute at Berkeley (and its hosts, David Collier, Gary Cox, and Henry Brady) for providing stimulating audiences for earlier versions of this paper. They thank as well David Freedman for critical commentary. Fearon thanks the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research for its support.

143 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study investigated several usability issues relating to linking configurations in an information retrieval application, and indicated that users of the hierarchical linking structure performed significantly better than those using network linking (on average requiring 49 s less per task).
Abstract: Hypertext systems parse documents into components connected by machine-supported links. This study investigated several usability issues relating to linking configurations in an information retriev...

130 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An extensive survey of earthquake survivors and longtime residents was undertaken to better understand the perceptions of seismic risk in Agadir, Morocco where two moderate earthquakes razed the city in 1960 leaving 15,000 dead and 25,000 injured.

79 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore the institutional mechanism by which incumbent authoritarian executives seek to engineer these elections and demonstrate the prevalent use of winner- takes-all electoral systems which generally work to the regimes advantage.
Abstract: Recent moves toward multi-party competition for elected legislatures in numerous Arab countries constitute a significant departure from earlier practices there and create the basis for democratic activists to gradually chip away at persistent authoritarian rule. This article explores the institutional mechanism by which incumbent authoritarian executives seek to engineer these elections. It documents examples for rulers changing electoral systems to ensure compliant legislatures and demonstrates the prevalent use of winner- takes-all electoral systems which generally work to the regimes advantage. The author then reviews various strategies of opposition forces--boycotts non- competition agreements election monitoring and struggles over election rules-- and the dilemmas that these entail. Surmounting differences in terms of ideologies as well as short-term political goals and prospects is a central challenge. The future should see greater electoral participation among opposition activists along with cleaner elections. As vote coercion and ballot box stuffing is restricted by opposition pressures electoral institutions will take on greater importance and struggles for proportional representation are likely to increase. (authors)

76 citations