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Harriet Edwards

Bio: Harriet Edwards is an academic researcher from Royal College of Art. The author has contributed to research in topics: Academic writing & Reflective practice. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 5 publications receiving 27 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The writing purposefully in art and design (Writing PAD) project as mentioned in this paper encourages debates around writing in A&D courses, including why students undertake practice-based Art and Design (A&D) degree courses, what kind of writing would support them best in their practice, and how to mark student writing that challenges our current writing criteria.
Abstract: Why do students undertaking practice-based Art and Design (A&D) degree courses have to write? What kind of writing would support them best in their practice? How do we mark student writing that challenges our current writing criteria? The ‘Writing Purposefully in Art and Design’ (Writing PAD) project seeks to encourage debates around writing in A&D. This article details the first year of the project and lays out the various debates that have developed. The project was initiated to focus specifically on disseminating current good practice for students with visual-spatial learning styles and dyslexia, international students, and mature students. This article presents the spectrum of views that have arisen from our discussions over the year. The issues presented are followed by the implications for change that have emerged from the various Writing PAD activities.

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a three-year initiative to enhance the undergraduate Extension Education minor at a state land-grant university was described, which involved revising the extension education minor curriculum due to varied curriculum and faculty changes and aligning eight extension education courses' units of study with Extension professional competency domains.
Abstract: This paper reports on a three-year initiative to enhance the undergraduate Extension Education minor at a state land-grant university. Specific initiatives to improve the undergraduate Extension Education minor curriculum involved (a) revising the Extension Education minor due to varied curriculum and faculty changes and (b) aligning eight Extension Education courses’ units of study with Extension professional competency domains. The described processes helped understand the Extension Education curriculum by mapping competency domains and showing which domains were and were not taught in the eight courses. A key recommendation is to incorporate the alignment of Extension Education curriculum and Extension professional competencies into the Extension summer internship program, among other uses. Furthermore, it is recommended that faculty engage in a similar effort to map college curricula to professional competencies to ensure that academic minors have a clear purpose in preparing students for careers.

Cited by
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Journal Article
TL;DR: The Research Student's Guide to Success (Book Review) requires prior specific permission and/or a fee to copy, post on servers, or to redistribute to lists.
Abstract: 327 ISSN 1436-4522 (online) and 1176-3647 (print). © International Forum of Educational Technology & Society (IFETS). The authors and the forum jointly retain the copyright of the articles. Permission to make digital or hard copies of part or all of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear the full citation on the first page. Copyrights for components of this work owned by others than IFETS must be honoured. Abstracting with credit is permitted. To copy otherwise, to republish, to post on servers, or to redistribute to lists, requires prior specific permission and/or a fee. Request permissions from the editors at kinshuk@ieee.org. The Research Student's Guide to Success (Book Review)

183 citations

DissertationDOI
31 May 2016
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a practice-centred teaching method for collaborative writing for design teams at M-level in higher education (HE) by using Approaches, Practices and Tools (APTs) across three case study workshops.
Abstract: This thesis offers and evaluates collaborative writing practices for teams of Design students at M-Level in Higher Education (HE). The research begins by asking why writing is included in current art and design HE, and identifies an assumption about the role of writing across the sector derived from a misreading of the 1960 and 1970 Coldstream Reports. As a result, drawing on recommendations that were made in the Reports for non-studio studies to be complementary to art and design practice in HE, I focus on how teams of design students can complement their design skills with collaborative writing. Some studies for addressing how design students learn from writing in HE already exist, but none have established a practice-centred teaching method for collaborative writing for design teams at M-level. My research captures the effects of my Approaches, Practices and Tools (APTs) across three case study workshops. I compare these with the most common writing model in HE designed for text-based study in the humanities. My APTs use participants' designerly strengths to redesign how they can use writing to complement their practice. This provides learners with a means of identifying and creating their own situated writing structures and practices. I document how my practice-centred APTs position collaborative writing practices as a designerly mode of communication between design practitioners working in teams. I show it to be more complementary to practice and so more effective in comparison to models imported from the humanities. My explorations are carried out through two thesis sections. Section One is an in-depth literature-based rationale that critically informs my investigations. Section Two presents my methodologies and reports three case studies, in which I explore the emergent data collected through a range of qualitative methods, mapping and evaluative techniques. The findings are of importance to those teaching M-Level design courses.

24 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Writing Purposefully in Art and Design Network (Writing-PAD) as mentioned in this paper aims to support and disseminate the range of genres associated with writing in art and design, including the exegesis and the studio or practice-based thesis.
Abstract: In disciplines with long histories in higher education, academic literacies, including writing practices, are less contested than in newer academic fields such as art and design The relatively recent incorporation of such fields and schools into the university sector has required these fields to create academic writing practices consistent with existing academic models or to justify their distinctive disciplinary practices Recently, for example, much has been written about the distinctiveness of practice-based, reflective and creative written genres, such as the exegesis and the studio or practice based thesis, as the distinctive voice of art and design However, such models have yet to gain broad acceptance in the higher education sector, where scientific (eg empirical research report) and humanities (eg essayist tradition) practices are far more familiar and of overarching significance Similarly to the sciences and humanities, the field of art and design in fact names a broad grouping of communities of practice, eg graphic design, fine arts, fashion design, with a range of expectations regarding practice and writing Whatever disciplinary consensus is reached regarding legitimate writing practices in art and design, it is important not to obscure these differences and make the same mistake that has hampered clarity in writing instruction for mainstream academic fields, a problem that is at the core of the academic literacies program for change and enlightenment The Writing Purposefully in Art and Design Network (Writing-PAD) aims to support and disseminate the range of genres associated with writing in art and design In the second part of this article, an account of the purposes, practices and scope of the Writing-PAD network demonstrates the characteristics of and consensus on forms of academic writing in art and design Together with our introductory review we hope to promote discussion about the necessary balance of consensus and dissensus that art and design fields require to remain vibrant

24 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: The authors found that very short, tightly-structured essays will foster risk by combining radical format, content demand and writing's esteem, and they also induced a supporting theory that absolutes and variables need careful balance, extending the bisociative notion of mixing tradition with innovation.
Abstract: The promise of the short text: writing risk into visual arts practice In this study I aim to see if writing can enhance visual arts practice. Much UK Quality Assurance Agency and Higher Education visual arts documentation recommends risk, as do many practitioners. I hypothesise that very short, tightly-structured essays will foster risk by combining radical format, content demand and writing’s esteem. I experimented with essays by Foundation visual arts students at Coventry University in 2011. Half the group was assigned a short essay as above, the other half a 1,000-word, conventional essay. Both groups had the same essay topic choices; both were taught in the same way as far as possible; both assignments were individual. Practice-based presentations took place shortly after the essays, and students were advised of potential connections between the tasks. Quantitative data was taken from all essay and presentation grades; qualitative data from essay drafts, questionnaires and interviews with selected 128-word essay students. The grades show the 128-word essay students slightly outperforming the others. Four themes emerged from the qualitative data: provisional meaning, risk, practice parallels and project process. Drafts and questionnaires showed improvisation and keen engagement; interviews (loosely following Bryman’s ‘unstructured’ model) considered content, form, convention, risk and transferability of writing to practice. The main problems students faced when writing the short essays were how to say enough and how to mix tradition with innovation. There was evidence that some students connected the short essay with their practice – but to connect is not necessarily to enhance. The short essays were very diverse, some radically inventive, others less so – yet the study recommends caution when rethinking traditional writing assignments because some students respect traditional writing, and may find the extreme form of the very short essay patronising unless it can promise more. The study’s contribution to knowledge is to promise more by making writing a metaphor for practice and evaluated as such, taking writing beyond mimicking or analysing practice. The study also induced a supporting theory that absolutes and variables need careful balance, extending the bisociative notion of mixing tradition with innovation. The study showed that these short essays could enhance practice by fostering risk, but also that risk is very variable. This questions how such risks are evaluated, and even whether an enforced risk is a risk at all, and not just ingenuity. The thesis has six chapters: Introduction; Literature review; The short story in visual arts practice; The short essay in action; Student responses; Conclusion. Appendices contain three associated papers and all drafts with comments, questionnaires with responses, and full interview transcripts annotated to demonstrate emerging themes and connections to research questions. The study draws on reader-response as a theoretical framework, and is informed by the study of visual arts academic writing, risk-taking in visual arts practice, Koestler’s bisociative understanding of creativity, provisional meaning and the short story. The promise of the short text: writing risk into visual arts practice Simon Bell August 2013 A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the University’s requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

21 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Preston and Thomassen as discussed by the authors investigated the relationship between designing and writing and their mutual interest in speculation, expression and research, and found that design practices and design processes contextualize and explicate an intellectual proposition, i.e. how design contributes to advancing knowledge.
Abstract: Stemming from a collaborative research project ‘designing, writing’, this article outlines preliminary findings to the various ways that design practices and design processes contextualize and explicate an intellectual proposition, i.e. how design contributes to advancing knowledge. The overall aim of the research investigation is to disseminate current understanding and best practice on the relationships between designing and writing and their mutual interest in speculation, expression and research. While most discussions around this topic adopt one of two (often polarized) distinct positions – the written text as sole authority and a design object’s capacity to be read as a cultural artefact – our investigation looks at various media of design articulation directly linked to design as a system of inquiry including but not limited to diaries, diagrams and choreographic notation and comics. These media expose a potential to ‘write’ through design and expand design research as non-linear, theoretical and yet practical tools. JWCP 3.1 art Preston and Thomassen_045-062.indd 45 6/21/10 9:25:32 AM Julieanna Preston | Aukje Thomassen

12 citations