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Author

Harshal Lowalekar

Other affiliations: Arizona State University
Bio: Harshal Lowalekar is an academic researcher from Indian Institute of Management Indore. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Supply chain & Record locking. The author has an hindex of 7, co-authored 11 publication(s) receiving 139 citation(s). Previous affiliations of Harshal Lowalekar include Arizona State University.
Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
Harshal Lowalekar1, N. Ravichandran1Institutions (1)
01 Sep 2014-Opsearch
Abstract: In this paper we provide an overview of the recent contributions in the area of blood bank inventory management and relate them to the challenges in the Indian context. We study the current blood-banking scenario in India and identify challenges that are peculiar to Indian blood banks. We review the role of formal methods in analyzing the complex blood bank inventory management problem and identify the existing research gaps in the context of blood banks. We conclude the paper by identifying several opportunities for micro modeling in the context of Indian blood banks.

33 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Harshal Lowalekar1, N. Ravichandran1Institutions (1)
01 Dec 2010-Transfusion
TL;DR: A typical blood bank gets its major supply of blood from organizing blood donation camps, but the quantity of blood collected is random and it might be sensible to cut off the supply at some level to reduce the wastages by overcollection.
Abstract: BACKGROUND: A typical blood bank gets its major supply of blood from organizing blood donation camps. The quantity of blood collected in the blood donation drives is random and it might be sensible to cut off the supply at some level to reduce the wastages by overcollection. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: In this paper we introduce two new cutoff level policies and compare their performance with the policy of collecting all the available supply at blood collection drives, which is quite prevalent among the blood banks. We develop a simulation model for collection that enables such comparison on the basis of shortages, wastages, and total costs. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The results obtained from the simulation model for a real-life situation show that the cutoff level policies are better than the unrestricted collection policy in controlling total costs. They also result in less wastage in the system for a given level of shortages.

26 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The purpose of this research is to demonstrate an application of TOC's thinking process (TP) in a blood bank environment. We take an example of a real-life blood bank which is struggling with the problems of high shortage and wastage of blood products, large inventory levels, poor and erratic blood collection, limited product variety, high error rate, high turnover of technicians, high operating expenses and low revenue levels. We show using the TOC approach how these seemingly unrelated problems faced by the bank are in fact highly inter-related and how they all originate from a single root-cause. A current reality tree (CRT) is used to identify the root cause responsible for all the major blood bank problems. A conflict resolution diagram (CRD) is constructed to identify the core-conflict(s) responsible for the blood bank's poor performance. A simple yet powerful solution is generated for the given bank by breaking the core-conflict resulting from a paradigm constraint in blood banking. A future reality tree (FRT) is then constructed to show how the TOC approach will help the blood bank in lowering its shortage and wastage levels in spite of collecting lesser number of units in blood donation camps. The bank will be able to significantly cut down its inventories and can issue fresher units to the patients. Blood bank's revenue levels will increase while its operating expense will decrease due to the TOC approach. The error rate as well as the turnover of technicians in the blood bank laboratory will also reduce considerably. A simulation model shows that the proposed TOC solution will reduce the annual shortage of red blood cells by 66% and platelets by 82% at the bank. Similarly, the wastage of red blood cells will decrease by 93%, plasma by 99% and platelets by 98%. The average inventory level of the red blood cells will drop by 41%, plasma by 95% and platelets by 10%. The major contribution of this research is to show that TP tools can be extremely powerful in constructing win-win solutions for complex systems like blood banks by addressing their major problems in an integrated fashion. The TOC approach reveals how one widely-held belief in the blood banking world is the main reason behind the blood banks' poor state of affairs. The solutions presented in this research should be readily applicable to other blood banks which are struggling to improve their operational and financial performance.

19 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A simulation model is developed to show that the combined age-and-stock-based policy would outperform some of the popular periodic reviews and continuous review policies in controlling total costs by about 5% on an average basis.
Abstract: This paper analyses the performance of an ordering policy for hospital blood banks (HBBs) that takes into account the information regarding the on-hand stock along with the remaining life of blood products. The blood items are assumed to start aging as soon as they have been collected. We develop a simulation model to show that the combined age-and-stock-based policy would outperform some of the popular periodic reviews and continuous review policies in controlling total costs by about 5% on an average basis. Our results show that the suggested policy will reduce the total operational cost of managing platelets, which have a very short shelf life, by about 27% at a real-life HBB. The policy will also lead to about 7% reduction in the total cost of the negative blood groups, which are characterized by extremely erratic demand patterns. The implementation of the ordering policy will help HBBs to reduce their operational costs while ensuring a minimum desirable level of the availability of critical blood products.

16 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: TOC's holistic approach helped the company to double its profits and improve its cash position during the Great Recession and help the company achieve a significant reduction in its finished goods, raw material and work-in-process inventories at various levels across the supply chain.
Abstract: This research describes in detail an application of theory of constraints (TOC) and its resulting benefits on the supply chain performance of India's largest lock manufacturing company over a perio...

11 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
J. Ben Atkinson1Institutions (1)

543 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An up-to-date review of perishable inventory models, but also of the joint key topics of publications from January 2012 until December 2015 in the research area of deteriorating inventory models is given.
Abstract: The aim of this work is not only to give an up-to-date review of perishable inventory models, but also of the joint key topics of publications from January 2012 until December 2015 in the research area of deteriorating inventory models. The advantage of this review is the ability to quickly find papers according to given key topics. Methodically, this paper is based on the literature review of Bakker et al. (2012) . However, we slightly modify the classification of inventory models of perishable goods in our work, and extend the existing key topics.

154 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: This paper presents a structured review of the literature on quantitative modelling for the blood product supply chain. This is a widely-researched topic, dating back to the 1960s, and several other reviews have been published over the years. However, this paper presents new relevant information for researchers, not only by including more recent models but chiefly because of the structured way in which the models are presented. The models are broken down into five categories. The first four categories represent the four stages (echelons) in the supply chain: collection, production, inventory, and delivery. The final category contains “integrated” models which cover more than one stage. Each section (other than integrated models, which are treated slightly differently) contains two distinct elements. The first element is a diagrammatic representation of decisions and relationships, broken down by hierarchy level (strategic – tactical – operational). The second element is a text description of the main features, contributions and gaps found in the analysed models. An additional element for each section is available online, namely a searchable table describing specific features of each echelon, together with a taxonomic key to assist the reader.

115 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An integrated simulation-optimization model to support both strategic and operational decisions in production planning is presented, showing that key indicators such as shortages, outdated units, donors required and cost are improved.
Abstract: Production planning in the blood supply chain is a challenging task. Many complex factors such as uncertain supply and demand, blood group proportions, shelf life constraints and different collection and production methods have to be taken into account, and thus advanced methodologies are required for decision making. This paper presents an integrated simulation-optimization model to support both strategic and operational decisions in production planning. Discrete-event simulation is used to represent the flows through the supply chain, incorporating collection, production, storing and distribution. On the other hand, an integer linear optimization model running over a rolling planning horizon is used to support daily decisions, such as the required number of donors, collection methods and production planning. This approach is evaluated using real data from a blood center in Colombia. The results show that, using the proposed model, key indicators such as shortages, outdated units, donors required and cost are improved.

62 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An enhanced perspective incorporating a two-phase preemptive policy by which the disruption risk is diminished through a hybrid technique using the fuzzy analytic hierarchy process and grey rational analysis for determining supplementary blood facilities, to cooperate in production process and decrease interruptions is addressed.
Abstract: As a service-oriented supply chain, blood supply chain management deals with a human-to-human network involved with a number of direct challenges such as irregularity in both blood supply and demand as well as multiplicity of blood products, their respective lifetimes and perishability. Besides, facing risks originating from natural disasters or man-made incidents such as labor strikes, economic problems, and so on, and from uncertainty embedded in the input data is also a real highlight in designing and managing a blood supply chain network. This paper addresses an enhanced perspective incorporating a two-phase preemptive policy by which the disruption risk is diminished through a hybrid technique using the fuzzy analytic hierarchy process and grey rational analysis for determining supplementary blood facilities, to cooperate in production process and decrease interruptions. Furthermore, a p-robust formulation is presented to control the network reliability under disruption scenarios at minimum cost. To protect the network against the uncertainty, a consolidated approach based on a recently developed fuzzy measure is extended. We also examine the validity and practicality of the proposed model and its solution perspective along with the reliability of the network by a real case of Iran. It is worth nothing that the problems in the case of disasters in which the impact of the two risk streams will be felt most keenly, could benefit from the proposed procedure advantages since it develops a proactive and controlling approach which can be extensively applicable in disastrous situation.

57 citations


Network Information
Related Authors (2)
N. Ravichandran

5 papers, 69 citations

100% related
N. Ravichandran

3 papers, 30 citations

100% related
Performance
Metrics

Author's H-index: 7

No. of papers from the Author in previous years
YearPapers
20201
20192
20172
20161
20151
20141