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Hee Soon Shin

Other affiliations: University of Tokyo
Bio: Hee Soon Shin is an academic researcher from Korea University of Science and Technology. The author has contributed to research in topics: Immunoglobulin E & Inflammation. The author has an hindex of 17, co-authored 73 publications receiving 909 citations. Previous affiliations of Hee Soon Shin include University of Tokyo.


Papers
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TL;DR: Dietary CHA use may aid in the prevention of intestinal inflammatory conditions and increases in the mRNA expression of colonic macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and IL-1β were significantly suppressed by CHA supplementation.

197 citations

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TL;DR: Turmeric significantly ameliorated food allergic symptoms in a mouse model of food allergy and was confirmed anti-allergic effect through promoting Th1 responses on Th2-dominant immune responses in immunized mice.

73 citations

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TL;DR: The results suggest that the habit of drinking coffee and/or eating fruits with a high CHA content may be beneficial to humans in preventing the genesis of inflammatory bowel diseases.
Abstract: Although chlorogenic acid (CHA) easily reaches a millimolar level in the gastrointestinal tract because of its high concentration in coffee and fruits, its effects on intestinal epithelial cells have been little reported. We investigated in this study the down-regulative effects of 5-caffeoylquinic acid (CQA), the predominant isomer of CHA, on the H2O2- or TNF-α-induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-8, a central pro-inflammatory chemokine involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases, in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. After the cells had been pre- and simultaneously treated with CQA, the oversecretion of IL-8 and overexpression of its mRNA induced by H2O2 were significantly suppressed in a dose-dependent manner in the range of 0.25–2.00 mmol/L. We further found that a metabolite of CQA, caffeic acid (CA), but not quinic acid, significantly inhibited the H2O2-induced IL-8 secretion and its mRNA expression in the same dose-dependent manner. Both CQA and CA suppressed the TNF-α-induc...

64 citations

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TL;DR: The results demonstrated that the administration of baicalein ameliorated the symptoms of food allergy and attenuated serum IgE and effector T cells, suggesting that baicalsein might serve as an effective immune regulator derived from foods for the treatment of food allergies.
Abstract: The incidence of food allergy, which is triggered by allergen permeation of the gastrointestinal tract followed by a T-helper (Th) 2-mediated immune response, has been increasing annually worldwide. We examined the effects of baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), a flavonoid from Scutellaria baicalensis used in oriental herbal medicine, on regulatory T (Treg) cell induction and intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions in a mouse model of food allergy. An allergic response was induced by oral challenge with ovalbumin, and the incidence of allergic symptoms and T cell-related activity in the mesenteric lymph nodes were analyzed with and without the presence of baicalein. Our results demonstrated that the administration of baicalein ameliorated the symptoms of food allergy and attenuated serum IgE and effector T cells. However, Treg-related factors were up-regulated by baicalein. Furthermore, baicalein was shown to enhance intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions. We also found that baicalein treatment induced the differentiation of Treg cells via aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs). Thus, the action of baicalein as an agonist of AhR can induce Treg differentiation and enhance barrier function, suggesting that baicalein might serve as an effective immune regulator derived from foods for the treatment of food allergy.

56 citations

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TL;DR: It is concluded that the presence of catechol groups in CHA and CA allows scavenging of intracellular ROS, thereby inhibiting H2O2-induced IL-8 production via suppression of PKD-NF-κB signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells.
Abstract: Chlorogenic acid (CHA) and caffeic acid (CA) are phenolic compounds found in coffee, which inhibit oxidative stress-induced interleukin (IL)-8 production in intestinal epithelial cells, thereby suppressing serious cellular injury and inflammatory intestinal diseases. Therefore, we investigated the anti-inflammatory mechanism of CHA and CA, both of which inhibited hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂)-induced IL-8 transcriptional activity. They also significantly suppressed nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) transcriptional activity, nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit, and phosphorylation of IκB kinase (IKK). Additionally, upstream of IKK, protein kinase D (PKD) was also suppressed. Finally, we found that they scavenged H₂O₂-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the functional moiety responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of CHA and CA was the catechol group. Therefore, we conclude that the presence of catechol groups in CHA and CA allows scavenging of intracellular ROS, thereby inhibiting H₂O₂-induced IL-8 production via suppression of PKD-NF-κB signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells.

55 citations


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953 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is speculated that CGA can perform crucial roles in lipid and glucose metabolism regulation and thus help to treat many disorders such as hepatic steatosis, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity as well.

757 citations

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TL;DR: The present review focused in flavonoids, the most abundant polyphenols in the diet, to give an overview of the most recent scientific knowledge about their impact on different inflammatory diseases.

502 citations

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TL;DR: Analysis of in vitro and in vivo evidence that CGAs and individual isomers can mitigate oxidative and inflammatory stresses and description of the molecular mechanisms that have a key role in the cell signaling activity that underlines important functions are focused on.
Abstract: Chlorogenic acids (CGAs) are esters formed between caffeic and quinic acids, and represent an abundant group of plant polyphenols present in the human diet. CGAs have different subgroups that include caffeoylquinic, p-coumaroylquinic, and feruloyquinic acids. Results of epidemiological studies suggest that the consumption of beverages such as coffee, tea, wine, different herbal infusions, and also some fruit juices is linked to reduced risks of developing different chronic diseases. These beverages contain CGAs present in different concentrations and isomeric mixtures. The underlying mechanism(s) for specific health benefits attributed to CGAs involves mitigating oxidative stress, and hence the related adverse effects associated with an unbalanced intracellular redox state. There is also evidence to show that CGAs exhibit anti-inflammatory activities by modulating a number of important metabolic pathways. This review will focus on three specific aspects of the relevance of CGAs in coffee beverages; namely: (1) the relative composition of different CGA isomers present in coffee beverages; (2) analysis of in vitro and in vivo evidence that CGAs and individual isomers can mitigate oxidative and inflammatory stresses; and (3) description of the molecular mechanisms that have a key role in the cell signaling activity that underlines important functions.

496 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The effects of CGAs on different aspects of health by reviewing the related literatures have been discussed and it is postulated that CGA is able to exert pivotal roles on glucose and lipid metabolism regulation and on the related disorders, e.g. diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), obesity, cancer, and hepatic steatosis.
Abstract: Chlorogenic acid (CGA), an important biologically active dietary polyphenol, is produced by certain plant species and is a major component of coffee. Reduction in the risk of a variety of diseases following CGA consumption has been mentioned in recent basic and clinical research studies. This systematic review discusses in vivo animal and human studies of the physiological and biochemical effects of chlorogenic acids (CGAs) on biomarkers of chronic disease. We searched PubMed, Embase, Amed and Scopus using the following search terms: ("chlorogenic acid" OR "green coffee bean extract") AND (human OR animal) (last performed on April 1st, 2015) for relevant literature on the in vivo effects of CGAs in animal and human models, including clinical trials on cardiovascular, metabolic, cancerogenic, neurological and other functions. After exclusion of editorials and letters, uncontrolled observations, duplicate and not relevant publications the remaining 94 studies have been reviewed. The biological properties of CGA in addition to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects have recently been reported. It is postulated that CGA is able to exert pivotal roles on glucose and lipid metabolism regulation and on the related disorders, e.g. diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), obesity, cancer, and hepatic steatosis. The wide range of potential health benefits of CGA, including its anti-diabetic, anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-obesity impacts, may provide a non-pharmacological and non-invasive approach for treatment or prevention of some chronic diseases. In this study, the effects of CGAs on different aspects of health by reviewing the related literatures have been discussed.

458 citations