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Helmut Sies

Bio: Helmut Sies is an academic researcher from University of Düsseldorf. The author has contributed to research in topics: Glutathione & Singlet oxygen. The author has an hindex of 133, co-authored 670 publications receiving 78319 citations. Previous affiliations of Helmut Sies include Leibniz Association & Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: These low molecular mass antioxidant molecules add significantly to the defense provided by the enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidases, which are termed ‘oxidative stress’.
Abstract: An imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants in favour of the oxidants, potentially leading to damage, is termed 'oxidative stress'. Oxidants are formed as a normal product of aerobic metabolism but can be produced at elevated rates under pathophysiological conditions. Antioxidant defense involves several strategies, both enzymatic and non-enzymatic. In the lipid phase, tocopherols and carotenes as well as oxy-carotenoids are of interest, as are vitamin A and ubiquinols. In the aqueous phase, there are ascorbate, glutathione and other compounds. In addition to the cytosol, the nuclear and mitochondrial matrices and extracellular fluids are protected. Overall, these low molecular mass antioxidant molecules add significantly to the defense provided by the enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidases.

4,485 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Lycopene, a biologically occurring carotenoid, exhibits the highest physical quenching rate constant with singlet oxygen, and its plasma level is slightly higher than that of beta-carotene, but those compounds with low kq values occur at higher plasma levels.

2,135 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Cellular protection against the deleterious effects of reactive oxidants generated in aerobic metabolism, called oxidative stress, is organized at multiple levels.
Abstract: Cellular protection against the deleterious effects of reactive oxidants generated in aerobic metabolism, called oxidative stress, is organized at multiple levels. Defense strategies include three levels of protection; prevention, interception, and repair. Regulation of the antioxidant capacity includes the maintenance of adequate levels of antioxidant and the localization of antioxidant compounds and enzymes. Short-term and long-term adaptation and cell specialisation in these functions are new areas of interest. Control over the activity of prooxidant enzymes, such as NADPH oxidase and NO synthases, is crucial. Synthetic antioxidants mimic biological strategies.

1,951 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work focuses on ROS at physiological levels and their central role in redox signalling via different post-translational modifications, denoted as ‘oxidative eustress’.
Abstract: 'Reactive oxygen species' (ROS) is an umbrella term for an array of derivatives of molecular oxygen that occur as a normal attribute of aerobic life. Elevated formation of the different ROS leads to molecular damage, denoted as 'oxidative distress'. Here we focus on ROS at physiological levels and their central role in redox signalling via different post-translational modifications, denoted as 'oxidative eustress'. Two species, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the superoxide anion radical (O2·-), are key redox signalling agents generated under the control of growth factors and cytokines by more than 40 enzymes, prominently including NADPH oxidases and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. At the low physiological levels in the nanomolar range, H2O2 is the major agent signalling through specific protein targets, which engage in metabolic regulation and stress responses to support cellular adaptation to a changing environment and stress. In addition, several other reactive species are involved in redox signalling, for instance nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide and oxidized lipids. Recent methodological advances permit the assessment of molecular interactions of specific ROS molecules with specific targets in redox signalling pathways. Accordingly, major advances have occurred in understanding the role of these oxidants in physiology and disease, including the nervous, cardiovascular and immune systems, skeletal muscle and metabolic regulation as well as ageing and cancer. In the past, unspecific elimination of ROS by use of low molecular mass antioxidant compounds was not successful in counteracting disease initiation and progression in clinical trials. However, controlling specific ROS-mediated signalling pathways by selective targeting offers a perspective for a future of more refined redox medicine. This includes enzymatic defence systems such as those controlled by the stress-response transcription factors NRF2 and nuclear factor-κB, the role of trace elements such as selenium, the use of redox drugs and the modulation of environmental factors collectively known as the exposome (for example, nutrition, lifestyle and irradiation).

1,809 citations


Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the catalytic activity of catalase has been investigated using ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometry and Titrimetric methods, which is suitable for comparative studies for large series of measurements.
Abstract: Publisher Summary Catalase exerts a dual function: (1) decomposition of H 2 O 2 to give H 2 O and O 2 (catalytic activity) and (2) oxidation of H donors, for example, methanol, ethanol, formic acid, phenols, with the consumption of 1 mol of peroxide (peroxide activity) The kinetics of catalase does not obey the normal pattern Measurements of enzyme activity at substrate saturation or determination of the K s is therefore impossible In contrast to reactions proceeding at substrate saturation, the enzymic decomposition of H 2 O 2 is a first-order reaction, the rate of which is always proportional to the peroxide concentration present Consequently, to avoid a rapid decrease in the initial rate of the reaction, the assay must be carried out with relatively low concentrations of H 2 O 2 (about 001 M) This chapter discusses the catalytic activity of catalase The method of choice for biological material, however, is ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometry Titrimetric methods are suitable for comparative studies For large series of measurements, there are either simple screening tests, which give a quick indication of the approximative catalase activity, or automated methods

20,238 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Attention is focussed on the ROS/RNS-linked pathogenesis of cancer, cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, and ageing.

12,240 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The mechanisms of ROS generation and removal in plants during development and under biotic and abiotic stress conditions are described and the possible functions and mechanisms for ROS sensing and signaling in plants are compared with those in animals and yeast.
Abstract: Several reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously produced in plants as byproducts of aerobic metabolism. Depending on the nature of the ROS species, some are highly toxic and rapidly detoxified by various cellular enzymatic and nonenzymatic mechanisms. Whereas plants are surfeited with mechanisms to combat increased ROS levels during abiotic stress conditions, in other circumstances plants appear to purposefully generate ROS as signaling molecules to control various processes including pathogen defense, programmed cell death, and stomatal behavior. This review describes the mechanisms of ROS generation and removal in plants during development and under biotic and abiotic stress conditions. New insights into the complexity and roles that ROS play in plants have come from genetic analyses of ROS detoxifying and signaling mutants. Considering recent ROS-induced genome-wide expression analyses, the possible functions and mechanisms for ROS sensing and signaling in plants are compared with those in animals and yeast.

9,908 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There is growing evidence that aging involves, in addition, progressive changes in free radical-mediated regulatory processes that result in altered gene expression.
Abstract: At high concentrations, free radicals and radical-derived, nonradical reactive species are hazardous for living organisms and damage all major cellular constituents. At moderate concentrations, how...

9,131 citations