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Author

Hermann Ethé

Bio: Hermann Ethé is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Persian. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 5 publications receiving 45 citations.
Topics: Persian

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, the scheme of Transcription Acquisitions since Ethe's catalogue Catalogue of Hermann Ethe (1930) has been introduced and a summary of its history is given.
Abstract: Preface Introduction Scheme of Transcription Acquisitions since Ethe's catalogue Catalogue of Hermann Ethe (1930) Bibliography Indexes

2 citations


Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
05 Nov 2019
TL;DR: The authors examines the innovative panoply of views on the nature of political authority, and visions of the sultanate as its form of embodiment, and concludes that there is a strong correlation between one's perception of human nature and vision of ideal rulership.
Abstract: This chapter examines the innovative panoply of views on the nature of political authority, and visions of the sultanate as its form of embodiment. Virtually every author writing on rulership felt it necessary first to address the question of what political authority really was, its raison d'etre and status among humanity, how it was acquired or lost, the nature of the ruler and his morality, and historical models of rulership. No author doubted the consensus-confirmed view that the sultanate was the highest rank a human being could attain, but they took divergent paths in defining its nature, scope, and entangled boundaries. A common attitude was to reconcile between various historical and theoretical models of political authority including philosopher-kingship, prophethood, and imamate by defining them in ways compatible with their own visions of rulership. Elaborating on a particular vision of rulership almost always involved an explanation of human nature, human beings' existential status, and the purpose of life. There is a strong correlation between one's perception of human nature and vision of ideal rulership.

39 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: This paper investigated the socio-political environment in shaping the forms of accommodation of Arabo-Persian knowledge in China and found that the sociopolitical circumstances during the latefifteenth century, characterized by the erosion of traditional Confusian ideology's authority and the popularization of knowledge, provided suitable conditions for the accommodation of foreign knowledge and paved the way for the rise of a scholarly movement interested in the study of Arabic and Persian texts.
Abstract: This dissertation charts the movement of knowledge of the natural world from the Islamicate world to China, and its subsequent transformations by local Chinese scholars. It argues that the study of Arabo-Persian texts constituted an important channel of knowledge transmission, connecting China to Western scholarly traditions. At this dissertation's core stands a movement of Chinese Muslim literati that emerged in the late-sixteenth century and promoted the study of Arabo-Persian texts. By importing methods of philological investigation from the Islamicate world, the movement sought to highlight knowledge of the subtleties and operations of the natural world embedded in Arabo-Persian texts. This study investigates the effects that China's socio-political environment had in shaping the forms of accommodation of Arabo-Persian knowledge. It discusses the utilitarian policies of the Yuan and early Ming dynasties that facilitated an early wave of transmission of specialized knowledge in fields such as astronomy, astrology and medicine to China, yet restricted the accommodation of Arabo-Persian philosophies of nature; advances the claim that the socio-political circumstances during the latefifteenth century, characterized by the erosion of traditional Confusian ideology's authority and the popularization of knowledge, provided suitable conditions for the accommodation of foreign knowledge and paved the way for the rise of a scholarly movement interested in the study of Arabic and Persian texts; surveys the rise of Islamic literature in translation and the genre of Chinese expositions on Islamic themes that emerged in the mid-17th century, resulting from pressures from the nonMuslim learned community and the efforts of Islamic scholars to widen their audience; and finally, it suggests that adverse socio-political conditions for Islamic scholarship emerged during the 18th century, and led to its breakdown. Through an analysis of the Persian and Arabic texts that circulated in China during the 16th to 18th centuries, this dissertation demonstrates the variety, richness, and unique features of the collection. Further, it discuses the effects of translation and printing on the accommodation of Arabo-Persian knowledge of the natural world in

34 citations

DOI
01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: A Desire for Meaning: Ḳhān-i Ārzūs Philology and the Place of India in the Eighteenth-Century Persianate World as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: A Desire for Meaning: Ḳhān-i Ārzū’s Philology and the Place of India in the Eighteenth-Century Persianate World

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A seventeenth-century text that attempts to reconcile Hindu and Muslim accounts of human genesis and cosmogony has been examined in this paper, where the authors argue that evidence of the Muslim prophets was available in ancient Hindu scriptures.
Abstract: This article examines a seventeenth-century text that attempts to reconcile Hindu and Muslim accounts of human genesis and cosmogony. The text, Mir’āt al-Makhlūqāt (‘Mirror of Creation’), written by a noted Mughal Sufi author Shaikh ‘Abd al-Rahman Chishti, purportedly a translation of a Sanskrit text, adopts rhetorical strategies and mythological elements of the Purāna tradition in order to argue that evidence of the Muslim prophets was available in ancient Hindu scriptures. Chishti thus accepts the reality of ancient Hindu gods and sages and notes the truth in their message. In doing so Chishti adopts elements of an older argument within the Islamic tradition that posits thousands of cycles of creation and multiple instances of Adam, the father of humans. He argues however that the Hindu gods and sages belonged to a different order of creation and time, and were not in fact human. The text bears some generic resemblance to Bhavishyottarapurāna materials. Chishti combines aspects of polemics with a deft u...

10 citations

Dissertation
24 Feb 2014
TL;DR: The role of horse and horse culture played in early modern South Asia through the lens of the genre of horse treatises (farasnama) produced in the Subcontinent in Persian as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The Horse: Conspicuous Consumption of Embodied Masculinity in South Asia, 16001850. Monica Meadows Chair of the Supervisory Committee: Joel Walker, Associate Professor History Department In this dissertation, I analyze the role the horse and horse culture played in early modern South Asia through the lens of the genre of horse treatises (farasnama) produced in the Subcontinent in Persian. My analysis of the farasnama ties in directly with the new analyses of the Mughal Empire as a dynamic imperial formation fueled by the upward mobility of peasant and pastoral groups working together with elite groups in Indian society who had command over complex economic and bureaucratic systems. The horse occupied a culturally defined place and reflected the status and identity of its owner, one that changed over the course of this period. The horse trade moved through these systems, supporting and extending the cultural norms on which these relationships were based. Even without crunching the numbers of the astonishing economic and political scale of this trade, one begins to get a sense of how truly extensive the cultural systems were that supported it, and how critical these same cultural systems were to maintaining the political power of the warrior elite.

10 citations