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Author

Hien Q. Huynh

Bio: Hien Q. Huynh is an academic researcher from University of Alberta. The author has contributed to research in topics: Epistemology & Economic Justice. The author has co-authored 1 publications.

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Journal ArticleDOI
29 Sep 2022-Tempo
TL;DR: In this article , the authors consider the implications of the consideration of epistemic justice within modes of composition pedagogy in higher education and frame the composers themselves as individuals prior to the technical exercises that they may undertake.
Abstract: Abstract This article considers the implications of the consideration of epistemic justice within modes of composition pedagogy in higher education and is in part a manifesto, in part a reflection on my experiences of teaching composition in this setting. I ask how composition education can become, as described in 2015 by the North Macedonian dramatist and creative educator Goran Stefanovski, ‘the politics of the impossible’. I question how composition education could function without a canon of examples or assumed master–apprentice hierarchies and frame this as a question of epistemic justice, one that considers the composers themselves as individuals prior to the technical exercises that they may undertake. I describe why I believe that epistemic justice is a concept that is worthy of consideration in creative education in composition alongside the ways that current models of composition pedagogy might unintentionally cause students to experience epistemic injustice within their education experiences. Rather than a prescriptive model, I propose challenges that I hope can influence my educational approach now and in the future and conclude with some suggestions about what a model of hermeneutic epistemic justice might look like as a pedagogic model for music composition.