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Hitendra K. Pillay

Other affiliations: University of Queensland
Bio: Hitendra K. Pillay is an academic researcher from Queensland University of Technology. The author has contributed to research in topics: Experiential learning & Active learning. The author has an hindex of 21, co-authored 140 publications receiving 1994 citations. Previous affiliations of Hitendra K. Pillay include University of Queensland.


Papers
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01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: The authors investigated the relationship between burnout and competence for a sample of mid-career teachers in primary and secondary schools in Queensland and reported a negative association between the MBI subscale Depersonalization and competence that may be attributed to a distancing mechanism in difficult human interactions.
Abstract: Traditionally, the teaching role has been one of nurturing and developing students’ potential. However, teachers’ work today comprises a complex mix of various factors that include teaching; learning new information and skills; keeping abreast of technological innovations and dealing with students, parents and the community. These are demanding roles and there are growing concerns about teacher well-being and competence. In particular, teachers are experiencing increasing levels of attrition, stress and burnout. This study investigated the relationship between burnout and competence for a sample of mid-career teachers in primary and secondary schools in Queensland. The results break new ground in reporting a negative association between the MBI subscale Depersonalization and competence that may be attributed to a distancing mechanism in difficult human interactions. Overall, the findings of this study hold implications for teacher training courses and the well-being and competence of teachers.

170 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article investigated the relationship between burnout and competence for a sample of mid-career teachers in primary and secondary schools in Queensland and reported a negative association between the MBI subscale Depersonalization and competence that may be attributed to a distancing mechanism in difficult human interactions.
Abstract: Traditionally, the teaching role has been one of nurturing and developing students’ potential. However, teachers’ work today comprises a complex mix of various factors that include teaching; learning new information and skills; keeping abreast of technological innovations and dealing with students, parents and the community. These are demanding roles and there are growing concerns about teacher well-being and competence. In particular, teachers are experiencing increasing levels of attrition, stress and burnout. This study investigated the relationship between burnout and competence for a sample of mid-career teachers in primary and secondary schools in Queensland. The results break new ground in reporting a negative association between the MBI subscale Depersonalization and competence that may be attributed to a distancing mechanism in difficult human interactions. Overall, the findings of this study hold implications for teacher training courses and the well-being and competence of teachers.

160 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The findings suggest that playing recreational computer games may influence children’s performance on subsequent computer-based educational tasks, however, the extent of this influence depended on how closely the recreational computer game types matched the design of the tasks in the educational software.
Abstract: This exploratory study investigated the influence of two recreational computer games on children’s subsequent performance on computer-based instructional tasks. Children were assigned to three groups: two were invited to play their respective recreational computer games, and the third acted as a control group. All three groups then worked on a common set of educational tasks from environmental education software. The three groups’ performances on a set of educational tasks were compared using quantitative analysis for speed and correct solutions, and then qualitatively for the cognitive manoeuvres engaged in to accomplish the tasks. The findings suggest that playing recreational computer games may influence children’s performance on subsequent computer-based educational tasks. However, the extent of this influence depended on how closely the recreational computer game types matched the design of the tasks in the educational software. The cognitive manoeuvres used by game players also depended on t...

123 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a diagnostic tool for assessing Tertiary students' readiness for online learning (TSROL) which has four subscales: technical skills, computer self-efficacy, learner preferences and attitude towards computers is presented.
Abstract: Increasing numbers of educational institutions are adopting an online approach to teaching and learning; however, little regard has been given to the prerequisite personal and technical qualities required for academic achievement and satisfaction within this environment. In recognition of this, researchers have been exploring the design, development and testing of diagnostic tools to assess student readiness for online learning. This study builds on previous work by the authors to further validate their diagnostic tool for assessing Tertiary students' readiness for online learning (TSROL) which has four subscales: 'Technical skills', 'Computer self-efficacy', 'Learner preferences' and 'Attitudes towards computers'. Factor and reliability analyses revealed that Technical skills and Computer self-efficacy possessed good reliability and validity, and 'Attitudes towards computers' fair reliability and validity. However, 'Learner preferences' required revision as it possessed poor reliability and validity. Analysing the demographic data revealed that older students had lower Technical Skills and computer self-efficacy than younger students. The TSROL can be improved by adopting a more multidimensional interpretation of the Learning preferences and Attitudes towards computers subscales.

115 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article investigated the mediating effect of learner selfconcept between conceptions of learning and students' approaches to learning using structural equation modelling, and found that learners who adopted a deep approach liked learning new things and indirectly viewed learning as experiential, involving social interaction and directly viewed it as personal development.
Abstract: This study investigated the mediating effect of learner selfconcept between conceptions of learning and students' approaches to learning using structural equation modelling. Data were collected using a modified version of Biggs' Learning Process Questionnaire, together with the recently developed 'What is Learning Survey' and 'Learner Self-Concept Scale'. A sample of 355 high school students participated in the study. Results indicate that learner self-concept does mediate between conceptions of meaning and approaches to learning. Students who adopted a deep approach liked learning new things and indirectly viewed learning as experiential, involving social interaction and directly viewed learning as personal development. Implications for teachers are discussed, with consideration given to appropriate classroom practice.

84 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the superiority of guided instruction is explained in the context of our knowledge of human cognitive architecture, expert-novice differences, and cognitive load, and it is shown that the advantage of guidance begins to recede only when learners have sufficiently high prior knowledge to provide "internal" guidance.
Abstract: Evidence for the superiority of guided instruction is explained in the context of our knowledge of human cognitive architecture, expert–novice differences, and cognitive load. Although unguided or minimally guided instructional approaches are very popular and intuitively appealing, the point is made that these approaches ignore both the structures that constitute human cognitive architecture and evidence from empirical studies over the past half-century that consistently indicate that minimally guided instruction is less effective and less efficient than instructional approaches that place a strong emphasis on guidance of the student learning process. The advantage of guidance begins to recede only when learners have sufficiently high prior knowledge to provide "internal" guidance. Recent developments in instructional research and instructional design models that support guidance during instruction are briefly described.

5,199 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

2,629 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: A detailed review of the education sector in Australia as in the data provided by the 2006 edition of the OECD's annual publication, 'Education at a Glance' is presented in this paper.
Abstract: A detailed review of the education sector in Australia as in the data provided by the 2006 edition of the OECD's annual publication, 'Education at a Glance' is presented. While the data has shown that in almost all OECD countries educational attainment levels are on the rise, with countries showing impressive gains in university qualifications, it also reveals that a large of share of young people still do not complete secondary school, which remains a baseline for successful entry into the labour market.

2,141 citations