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Horst W. J. Rittel

Bio: Horst W. J. Rittel is an academic researcher from University of California, Berkeley. The author has contributed to research in topics: Information needs & Iterative design. The author has an hindex of 6, co-authored 9 publications receiving 12274 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The search for scientific bases for confronting problems of social policy is bound to fail, becuase of the nature of these problems as discussed by the authors, whereas science has developed to deal with tame problems.
Abstract: The search for scientific bases for confronting problems of social policy is bound to fail, becuase of the nature of these problems. They are “wicked” problems, whereas science has developed to deal with “tame” problems. Policy problems cannot be definitively described. Moreover, in a pluralistic society there is nothing like the undisputable public good; there is no objective definition of equity; policies that respond to social problems cannot be meaningfully correct or false; and it makes no sense to talk about “optimal solutions” to social problems unless severe qualifications are imposed first. Even worse, there are no “solutions” in the sense of definitive and objective answers.

13,262 citations

01 Jan 1984

388 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Systems design methods of the 2nd generation have to cope with the “wicked” character of tasks of information systems design and must provide the methodological basis.

26 citations


Cited by
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TL;DR: Unlike other major causes of preventable death and disability, such as tobacco use, injuries, and infectious diseases, there are no exemplar populations in which the obesity epidemic has been reversed by public health measures, which increases the urgency for evidence-creating policy action, with a priority on reduction of the supply-side drivers.

3,817 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: A survey of existing hypertext systems, their applications, and their design can be found in this article, where the authors present a survey of some of the most important design issues that go into fashioning a hypertext environment.
Abstract: This article is a survey of existing hypertext systems, their applications, and their design. It is both an introduction to the world of hypertext and, at a deeper cut, a survey of some of the most important design issues that go into fashioning a hypertext environment. The concept of hypertext is quite simple: Windows on the screen are associated with objects in a database, and links are provided between these objects, both graphically (as labelled tokens) and in the database (as pointers). But this simple idea is creating much excitement. Several universities have created laboratories for research on hypertext, many articles have been written about the concept just within the last year, and the Smithsonian Institute has created a demonstration laboratory to develop and display hypertext technologies.

2,617 citations

Book
Nigel Cross1
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: In this article, the authors take up the arguments for a "third area" of education (design) that were outlined by Archer, and further define this area by contrasting it with the other two (sciences and humanities) and consider the criteria which design must satisfy to be acceptable as a part of general education.
Abstract: This is the third paper in a series being published in Design Studies, which aims to establish the theoretical bases for treating design as a coherent discipline of study. The first contribution in the series was from Bruce Archer, in the very first issue of Design Studies, and the second was from Gerald Nadler, in Vol 1, No 5. Further contributions are invited. Here, Higel Cross takes up the arguments for a ‘third area’ of education—design—that were outlined by Archer. He further defines this area by contrasting it with the other two—sciences and humanities—and goes on to consider the criteria which design must satisfy to be acceptable as a part of general education. Such an acceptance must imply a reorientation from the instrumental aims of conventional design education, towards intrinsic values. These values derive from the ‘designerly ways of knowing’. Because of a common concern with these fundamental ‘ways of knowing’, both design research and design education are contributing to the development of design as a discipline.

2,593 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A survey of existing hypertext systems, their applications, and their design is both an introduction to the world of hypertext and a survey of some of the most important design issues that go into fashioning a hypertext environment.
Abstract: This article is a survey of existing hypertext systems, their applications, and their design. It is both an introduction to the world of hypertext and, at a deeper cut, a survey of some of the most important design issues that go into fashioning a hypertext environment. The concept of hypertext is quite simple: Windows on the screen are associated with objects in a database, and links are provided between these objects, both graphically (as labelled tokens) and in the database (as pointers). But this simple idea is creating much excitement. Several universities have created laboratories for research on hypertext, many articles have been written about the concept just within the last year, and the Smithsonian Institute has created a demonstration laboratory to develop and display hypertext technologies.

2,548 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A layered behavioral model is used to analyze how three of these problems—the thin spread of application domain knowledge, fluctuating and conflicting requirements, and communication bottlenecks and breakdowns—affected software productivity and quality through their impact on cognitive, social, and organizational processes.
Abstract: The problems of designing large software systems were studied through interviewing personnel from 17 large projects. A layered behavioral model is used to analyze how three of these problems—the thin spread of application domain knowledge, fluctuating and conflicting requirements, and communication bottlenecks and breakdowns—affected software productivity and quality through their impact on cognitive, social, and organizational processes.

2,210 citations