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Huafu Chen

Bio: Huafu Chen is an academic researcher from University of Electronic Science and Technology of China. The author has contributed to research in topics: Resting state fMRI & Default mode network. The author has an hindex of 36, co-authored 86 publications receiving 4315 citations. Previous affiliations of Huafu Chen include Chinese Ministry of Education & Third Military Medical University.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
08 Jan 2010-PLOS ONE
TL;DR: The mTLE alterations observed in functional connectivity and topological properties may be used to define tentative disease markers, including altered small-world properties in patients, along with smaller degree of connectivity, increased n-to-1 connectivity, smaller absolute clustering coefficients and shorter absolute path length.
Abstract: Background The functional architecture of the human brain has been extensively described in terms of functional connectivity networks, detected from the low–frequency coherent neuronal fluctuations that can be observed in a resting state condition. Little is known, so far, about the changes in functional connectivity and in the topological properties of functional networks, associated with different brain diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigated alterations related to mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE), using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging on 18 mTLE patients and 27 healthy controls. Functional connectivity among 90 cortical and subcortical regions was measured by temporal correlation. The related values were analyzed to construct a set of undirected graphs. Compared to controls, mTLE patients showed significantly increased connectivity within the medial temporal lobes, but also significantly decreased connectivity within the frontal and parietal lobes, and between frontal and parietal lobes. Our findings demonstrated that a large number of areas in the default-mode network of mTLE patients showed a significantly decreased number of connections to other regions. Furthermore, we observed altered small-world properties in patients, along with smaller degree of connectivity, increased n-to-1 connectivity, smaller absolute clustering coefficients and shorter absolute path length. Conclusions/Significance We suggest that the mTLE alterations observed in functional connectivity and topological properties may be used to define tentative disease markers.

485 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It was demonstrated that functional connectivity had good diagnostic potential for SAD, thus providing evidence for the possible use of whole brain functional connectivity as a complementary tool in clinical diagnosis.
Abstract: Recent research has shown that social anxiety disorder (SAD) is accompanied by abnormalities in brain functional connections. However, these findings are based on group comparisons, and, therefore, little is known about whether functional connections could be used in the diagnosis of an individual patient with SAD. Here, we explored the potential of the functional connectivity to be used for SAD diagnosis. Twenty patients with SAD and 20 healthy controls were scanned using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. The whole brain was divided into 116 regions based on automated anatomical labeling atlas. The functional connectivity between each pair of regions was computed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient and used as classification feature. Multivariate pattern analysis was then used to classify patients from healthy controls. The pattern classifier was designed using linear support vector machine. Experimental results showed a correct classification rate of 82.5 % (p < 0.001) with sensitivity of 85.0 % and specificity of 80.0 %, using a leave-one-out cross-validation method. It was found that the consensus connections used to distinguish SAD were largely located within or across the default mode network, visual network, sensory-motor network, affective network, and cerebellar regions. Specifically, the right orbitofrontal region exhibited the highest weight in classification. The current study demonstrated that functional connectivity had good diagnostic potential for SAD, thus providing evidence for the possible use of whole brain functional connectivity as a complementary tool in clinical diagnosis. In addition, this study confirmed previous work and described novel pathophysiological mechanisms of SAD.

299 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A relationship between functional connectivity and disease severity was found in specific regions of RSNs, including medial and lateral prefrontal cortex, as well as parietal and occipital regions.

284 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a blind deconvolution technique for BOLD-fMRI signal is proposed, where point processes corresponding to signal fluctuations with a given signature are individuated, and a region-specific hemodynamic response function (HRF) is extracted and used to deconvolve BOLD signal.

244 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results revealed that state‐specific FNC disruptions were observed in IGE‐GTCS and the majority of aberrant functional connectivity manifested itself in default mode network and suggested that the dynamic FNC analysis was a promising avenue to deepen the understanding of this disease.
Abstract: Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) has been linked with disrupted intra-network connectivity of multiple resting-state networks (RSNs); however, whether impairment is present in inter-network interactions between RSNs, remains largely unclear. Here, 50 patients with IGE characterized by generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) and 50 demographically matched healthy controls underwent resting-state fMRI scans. A dynamic method was implemented to investigate functional network connectivity (FNC) in patients with IGE-GTCS. Specifically, independent component analysis was first carried out to extract RSNs, and then sliding window correlation approach was employed to obtain dynamic FNC patterns. Finally, k-mean clustering was performed to characterize six discrete functional connectivity states, and state analysis was conducted to explore the potential alterations in FNC and other dynamic metrics. Our results revealed that state-specific FNC disruptions were observed in IGE-GTCS and the majority of aberrant functional connectivity manifested itself in default mode network. In addition, temporal metrics derived from state transition vectors were altered in patients including the total number of transitions across states and the mean dwell time, the fraction of time spent and the number of subjects in specific FNC state. Furthermore, the alterations were significantly correlated with disease duration and seizure frequency. It was also found that dynamic FNC could distinguish patients with IGE-GTCS from controls with an accuracy of 77.91% (P < 0.001). Taken together, this study not only provided novel insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of IGE-GTCS but also suggested that the dynamic FNC analysis was a promising avenue to deepen our understanding of this disease. Hum Brain Mapp 38:957-973, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

237 citations


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Journal ArticleDOI
04 Jul 2013-PLOS ONE
TL;DR: This work has developed a graph-theoretical network visualization toolbox, called BrainNet Viewer, to illustrate human connectomes as ball-and-stick models, and helps researchers to visualize brain networks in an easy, flexible and quick manner.
Abstract: The human brain is a complex system whose topological organization can be represented using connectomics. Recent studies have shown that human connectomes can be constructed using various neuroimaging technologies and further characterized using sophisticated analytic strategies, such as graph theory. These methods reveal the intriguing topological architectures of human brain networks in healthy populations and explore the changes throughout normal development and aging and under various pathological conditions. However, given the huge complexity of this methodology, toolboxes for graph-based network visualization are still lacking. Here, using MATLAB with a graphical user interface (GUI), we developed a graph-theoretical network visualization toolbox, called BrainNet Viewer, to illustrate human connectomes as ball-and-stick models. Within this toolbox, several combinations of defined files with connectome information can be loaded to display different combinations of brain surface, nodes and edges. In addition, display properties, such as the color and size of network elements or the layout of the figure, can be adjusted within a comprehensive but easy-to-use settings panel. Moreover, BrainNet Viewer draws the brain surface, nodes and edges in sequence and displays brain networks in multiple views, as required by the user. The figure can be manipulated with certain interaction functions to display more detailed information. Furthermore, the figures can be exported as commonly used image file formats or demonstration video for further use. BrainNet Viewer helps researchers to visualize brain networks in an easy, flexible and quick manner, and this software is freely available on the NITRC website (www.nitrc.org/projects/bnv/).

3,048 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The inception of this journal has been foreshadowed by an ever-increasing number of publications on functional connectivity, causal modeling, connectomics, and multivariate analyses of distributed patterns of brain responses.
Abstract: Over the past 20 years, neuroimaging has become a predominant technique in systems neuroscience. One might envisage that over the next 20 years the neuroimaging of distributed processing and connectivity will play a major role in disclosing the brain's functional architecture and operational principles. The inception of this journal has been foreshadowed by an ever-increasing number of publications on functional connectivity, causal modeling, connectomics, and multivariate analyses of distributed patterns of brain responses. I accepted the invitation to write this review with great pleasure and hope to celebrate and critique the achievements to date, while addressing the challenges ahead.

2,822 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A MATLAB toolbox called Data Processing Assistant for Resting-State fMRI (DPARSF) for "pipeline" data analysis of resting-state fMRI is developed and users can use DPARSF to extract time courses from regions of interest.
Abstract: Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has attracted more and more attention because of its effectiveness, simplicity and non-invasiveness in exploration of the intrinsic functional architecture of the human brain. However, user-friendly toolbox for "pipeline" data analysis of resting-state fMRI is still lacking. Based on some functions in Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) and Resting-State fMRI Data Analysis Toolkit (REST), we have developed a MATLAB toolbox called Data Processing Assistant for Resting-State fMRI (DPARSF) for "pipeline" data analysis of resting-state fMRI. After the user arranges the DICOM files and click a few buttons to set parameters, DPARSF will then give all the preprocessed (slice timing, realign, normalize, smooth) data and results for functional connectivity (FC), regional homogeneity (ReHo), amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF), and fractional ALFF (fALFF). DPARSF can also create a report for excluding subjects with excessive head motion and generate a set of pictures for easily checking the effect of normalization. In addition, users can also use DPARSF to extract time courses from regions of interest.

2,556 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors review the scientific knowledge on expertise and expert performance and how experts may differ from non-experts in terms of their development, training, reasoning, knowledge, social support, and innate talent.
Abstract: This is the first handbook where the world’s foremost “experts on expertise” review our scientific knowledge on expertise and expert performance and how experts may differ from non-experts in terms of their development, training, reasoning, knowledge, social support, and innate talent. Methods are described for the study of experts’ knowledge and their performance of representative tasks from their domain of expertise. The development of expertise is also studied by retrospective interviews and the daily lives of experts are studied with diaries. In 15 major domains of expertise, the leading researchers summarize our knowledge of the structure and acquisition of expert skill and knowledge and discuss future prospects. General issues that cut across most domains are reviewed in chapters on various aspects of expertise, such as general and practical intelligence, differences in brain activity, self-regulated learning, deliberate practice, aging, knowledge management, and creativity.

1,268 citations