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Ieva Meidutė-Kavaliauskienė

Bio: Ieva Meidutė-Kavaliauskienė is an academic researcher from Vilnius Gediminas Technical University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Sustainability & Supply chain. The author has an hindex of 17, co-authored 46 publications receiving 714 citations. Previous affiliations of Ieva Meidutė-Kavaliauskienė include ISCTE – University Institute of Lisbon & Portuguese Military Academy.

Papers published on a yearly basis

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present the results of the research related to customer satisfaction with logistic services and their quality, including acceptance of orders, their execution or the solution of problems.

89 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a conceptual reference model for risk assessment of residential real estate using fuzzy cognitive mapping is developed, which allows cause and effect relationships between determinants to be identified and better understood, which in turn allows for better informed investment decisions.
Abstract: Risk analysis of residential real estate investments requires careful analysis of certain variables (or determinants). Because real estate is a key sector for economic and social development, this risk analysis is seen as critical in supporting decision processes relating to buying or selling residential properties, partly due to the pressures caused by the current economic environment. This study aims to develop a conceptual reference model for risk assessment of residential real estate using fuzzy cognitive mapping. This fuzzy model allows cause-and-effect relationships between determinants to be identified and better understood, which in turn allows for better informed investment decisions. The results show that the use of cognitive maps reduces the number of omitted criteria and favors learning with regard to how the criteria relate to each other, holding great potential and versatility in structuring complex decision problems. Practical implications, strengths and weaknesses of our proposal a...

57 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study sought to develop a multiple-criteria model that facilitates the evaluation of green cities’ sustainability, based on cognitive mapping techniques and the Choquet integral (CI), and validated both by the panel members and a parliamentary representative of the Portuguese ecology party “Os Verdes” (The Greens), who confirmed that the evaluation system created distinguishes between cities according to how strongly they adhere to “green” principles.

46 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper proposes and tests an integrated application of cognitive mapping and multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA), thus combining metacognitive and psychometric decision-making approaches, to create a framework for the assessment of bank customer loyalty, which identifies its determinants and allows the trade-offs among them to be calculated.
Abstract: Greater competition and the aftermath of the financial crisis have meant that banks are increasingly focused on improving service quality and achieving higher levels of customer loyalty. Doing so requires being able to identify, understand and measure the determinants of such loyalty, however; and given the variety of multi-faceted factors involved, and the interrelationships among them, this is a complex undertaking. This paper proposes and tests an integrated application of cognitive mapping and multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA), thus combining metacognitive and psychometric decision-making approaches, to create a framework for the assessment of bank customer loyalty, which identifies its determinants and allows the trade-offs among them to be calculated. Practical advantages and limitations of our proposal are also discussed.

45 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors proposed a multiple criteria framework for bank customer loyalty measurement and management, based on the integrated use of cognitive maps and measuring attractiveness by a categorical based evaluation technique (MACBETH).
Abstract: Bank customer loyalty is becoming a priority concern for banking institutions, as a means of gradually increasing complementary margins and eliminating the lack of liquidity caused by the current economic climate. Following a top down process, this focus culminates at the branch level, where banks’ front office employees are seen as a driving-force for building customer loyalty. At the same time, however, the difficulty in identifying and operationalizing the factors or determinants that most contribute to creating and maintaining bank customer loyalty has long been recognized. In this sense, based on the integrated use of cognitive maps and measuring attractiveness by a categorical based evaluation technique (MACBETH), this study proposes a multiple criteria framework for bank customer loyalty measurement and management. The results show that our framework allows bank customers with higher rates of customer loyalty to be identified and, from a benchmarking perspective, indicates what best practic...

43 citations


Cited by
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Journal Article
TL;DR: In challenging times, all leaders would like to improve their strategic decision-making capabilities, and a handful of well-regarded techniques to improve strategic decision making are used by global companies, and, perhaps, one or more of these techniques might work in your organization.
Abstract: In challenging times, all leaders would like to improve their strategic decision-making capabilities. I make an effort to read widely in the management literature, including the McKinsey Quarterly. A recent piece1 in that publication caught my attention, and I would like to summarize aspects of it for our readers. A handful of well-regarded techniques to improve strategic decision making are used by global companies, and, perhaps, one or more of these techniques might work in your organization. Let me elucidate a few of them. Experts agree that in any complex human endeavor we need to harness bias; that is, rather than trying to tune out bias, we might encourage it and attempt to balance it with effective decision making. A tool to further this notion is the balance sheet, whereby a leader might ask his direct reports to “Tell me what is good about this particular opportunity, tell me what is bad about it, do not tell me your judgment yet; I don’t want to know.”1 This starts the evaluation process without having to justify and, thereby, frees opinions. Internal leaders are allowed to give their best insights and fully consider the ideas of others. The balance sheet process “mitigates a lot of the friction that typically arises when people marshal the facts that support their case, while ignoring those that don’t.”1 Another technique is creating a culture where failure is not a wrong answer. This process starts with an acknowledgement that Plan A “probably is based upon flawed assumptions and that certain leap-of-faith questions are fundamental to arriving at a better answer.”1 Even in moderate-sized organizations, there is often a sense that Plan A is going to succeed because it’s well analyzed, it’s vetted, it’s crisp, it looks great on the spreadsheet — and it’s the one that everybody has to execute. The reality is that it may not work, and having a corporate culture that recognizes that Plan B might be pretty good gets people off the blame game and rewards those who are able to make a mid-course correction. Yet another technique might be listening to the little voice. This is very difficult for leaders, because no matter how important these individuals are, they may find it difficult to grapple with diverse opinions, especially among their direct reports. Leaders who can change their opinion based on the strength of the arguments around the table are going to be more successful on average than those who cannot. Facing tough people choices is another important skill set for improving strategic decision making. Often, leaders tend to compromise. “It’s very easy to close your eyes and say warm bodies are better then no bodies,”1 but it turns out that it’s best to be unyielding regarding the hiring decision. One should always look for good listeners who are capable of adapting. This is the single most important leadership trait outside of pure competence in one’s field. Another important tool is knowing when to let go, which could mean shutting down a particular drug development program or outsourcing part of another. These are often the hardest decisions to make and the ones that don’t get nearly enough focus. The most difficult decisions are the legacy ones — “the historical investments, the things that are just easier to chip away at rather than make a tough decision.”1 It’s best to have no preconceived commitment to a legacy business. Lastly, a leader’s ability to strike the right balance between decisiveness and timeliness is critical. The best management brains believe that timeliness trumps perfection; to translate, sometimes “the most damaging decisions are the missed opportunities, the decisions that didn’t get made in time. If you are creating a category of bad decisions you’ve made, you need to include all the decisions you didn’t get to make because you missed the window of time that existed to take advantage of an opportunity.”1 This is a skill that can be developed over time. Cultivating internal critics, facing tough people choices, and knowing when to let go are important components of the toolkit that comprises strategic decision making. Healthcare is no different than any other complex business. We can all improve our strategic decision making as we seek to utilize resources parsimoniously and derive the greatest benefit from the people power that our organizations represent. As always, I am interested in your views. You can reach me by e-mail at «ude.nosreffej@hsan.divad». Also, please visit my blog at: «http://nashhealthpolicy.blogspot.com».

216 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore business models for sustainability in the service industry, particularly banking, and explore the receptiveness of customers towards sustainable business models pursued by banks in Hong Kong.

197 citations

Book ChapterDOI
05 Apr 2019

180 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, a reference point theory is used for multi-objective optimization by ratio analysis (MOORA), which takes care of different objectives with the objectives keeping their own units.
Abstract: Multi-Objective Optimization takes care of different objectives with the objectives keeping their own units. The internal mechanical solution of a Ratio System, producing dimensionless numbers, is preferred. The ratio system creates the opportunity to use a second approach: a Reference Point Theory, which uses the ratios of the ratio system. This overall theory is called MOORA (Multi-Objective Optimization by Ratio Analysis). The results are still more convincing if a Full Multiplicative Form is added forming MULTIMOORA. The control by three different approaches forms a guaranty for a solution being as non-subjective as possible. MULTIMOORA, tested after robustness, showed positive results.

162 citations