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Ilkka Lindstedt

Bio: Ilkka Lindstedt is an academic researcher from University of Helsinki. The author has contributed to research in topics: Islam & Genius. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 13 publications receiving 82 citations.
Topics: Islam, Genius, Judaism, Talmud, Arabic literature

Papers
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13 Dec 2013
TL;DR: The authors explored similarities in the anti-religious opinions of Ibn al-Rawwandi and Abū l-ʿAl-Al-ʾ al-Maʾarrī, for instance, their denial of the authenticity of prophecy and their shared assertion of the human origins of religion in general and Islam in particular.
Abstract: This article explores similarities in the anti-religious opinions of Ibn al-Rāwandī and Abū l-ʿAlāʾ al-Maʿarrī, for instance, their denial of the authenticity of prophecy and their shared assertion of the human origins of religion in general and Islam in particular.

39 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
30 May 2017
TL;DR: In this paper, a study on the Arabic historical narratives of the ʿAbbāsid revolution and its aftermath that occurred in 747-755 CE is presented, where the main focus is a medieval work on these events, called the Kitāb al-Dawla, composed by an Arabic Muslim collector and composer of historical narratives, Abū l-Ḥasan ǫ b. Muḥammad al-Madāʾinī (d. c.228/842-843).
Abstract: This is a study on the Arabic historical narratives of the ʿAbbāsid revolution and its aftermath that occurred in 747–755 CE. Its main focus is a medieval work on these events, called the Kitāb al-Dawla, composed by an Arabic Muslim collector and composer of historical narratives, Abū l-Ḥasan ʿAlī b. Muḥammad al-Madāʾinī (d. c.228/842–843). The work is not extant, but its skeleton can be reconstructed on the basis of later quotations of it. Al-Madāʾinī’s Kitāb al-Dawla is an important source for the events of the the ʿAbbāsid revolution: since al-Madāʾinī was not directly sponsored by the ʿAbbāsid dynasty, he was not constrained to be a spokesperson for the ruling house’s propaganda needs.

20 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is by now commonly known that the early followers of the Prophet Muḥammad were not primarily titled Muslims, muslimūn. Rather, the documentary Arabic evidence shows that they called themselves “believers,” muʾminūn as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: It is by now commonly known that the early followers of the Prophet Muḥammad were not primarily titled Muslims, muslimūn. Rather, the documentary Arabic evidence shows that they called themselves “Believers,” muʾminūn.1 It must be admitted that there are some Qurʾānic passages where muslimūn and islām seem to be employed as technical terms. The most compelling is Q. 22:78, “He (God) has named you almuslimīn.”2 But outside the Qurʾān, the word Islam, as a name of the religion, appears for the first time on the tombstone of a woman named ʿAbbāsa dated 71

10 citations

Book ChapterDOI
17 Jul 2019
TL;DR: A Greek emperor named Constans will rise up over the Greeks and the Romans and devastate pagans and their temples, executing those who refuse conversion as mentioned in this paper, at which point the Jews will convert and the peoples of Gog and Magog will break loose.
Abstract: A Greek emperor named Constans will rise up over the Greeks and the Romans and devastate pagans and their temples, executing those who refuse conversion. Toward the end of his long reign the Jews will convert, at which point the Antichrist will appear and the peoples of Gog and Magog will break loose. The emperor will vanquish them with his army, after which he will travel to Jerusalem and lay down his diadem and robes, relinquishing authority to God. The Antichrist then will briefly reign, sitting in the House of the Lord in Jerusalem. Before long, however, the Lord will send the Archangel Michael to defeat him, thus preparing the way for the Second Coming.3

3 citations


Cited by
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Book
13 Jun 2019
TL;DR: In this article, the authors reveal those discussions for the first time in all their diversity, drawing on unexplored medieval sources in the realms of law, history, poetry, entertaining literature, administration, and polemic.
Abstract: The caliphs and sultans who once ruled the Muslim world were often assisted by powerful Jewish, Christian, Zoroastrian, and other non-Muslim state officials, whose employment occasioned energetic discussions among Muslim scholars and rulers. This book reveals those discussions for the first time in all their diversity, drawing on unexplored medieval sources in the realms of law, history, poetry, entertaining literature, administration, and polemic. It follows the discourse on non-Muslim officials from its beginnings in the Umayyad empire (661–750), through medieval Iraq, Egypt, Syria, and Spain, to its apex in the Mamluk period (1250–1517). Far from being an intrinsic part of Islam, views about non-Muslim state officials were devised, transmitted, and elaborated at moments of intense competition between Muslim and non-Muslim learned elites. At other times, Muslim rulers employed non-Muslims without eliciting opposition. The particular shape of the Islamic discourse on this issue is comparable to analogous discourses in medieval Europe and China.

51 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
15 May 2005
TL;DR: In this paper, a nouvelle analysis of the premiere communaute de Muḥammad is presented, arguant du fait que, contrairement au postulat habituel de la recherche moderne, les identites confessionnelles n’etaient pas encore precisement definies.
Abstract: L’A. propose une nouvelle analyse de la premiere communaute qui se cristallisa autour de Muḥammad, arguant du fait que, contrairement au postulat habituel de la recherche moderne, les identites confessionnelles n’etaient pas encore precisement definies. Cette communaute premiere etait celle de croyants (mu’minīn) partageant la croyance en un Dieu unique et en un jour du Jugement dernier. Ces croyants etaient soumis a la loi divine (Donner propose de traduire « dīn » par « loi » dans plusieurs...

49 citations

13 Dec 2013
TL;DR: The authors explored similarities in the anti-religious opinions of Ibn al-Rawwandi and Abū l-ʿAl-Al-ʾ al-Maʾarrī, for instance, their denial of the authenticity of prophecy and their shared assertion of the human origins of religion in general and Islam in particular.
Abstract: This article explores similarities in the anti-religious opinions of Ibn al-Rāwandī and Abū l-ʿAlāʾ al-Maʿarrī, for instance, their denial of the authenticity of prophecy and their shared assertion of the human origins of religion in general and Islam in particular.

39 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1990

39 citations