scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Ishtiaq Husain Qureshi

Bio: Ishtiaq Husain Qureshi is an academic researcher from University of Michigan. The author has contributed to research in topics: Empire & Administration (government). The author has an hindex of 7, co-authored 14 publications receiving 160 citations.

Papers
More filters

Cited by
More filters
Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: In this paper, the three partitions of 1947 are discussed and the evidence of the historian is presented. But the authors do not discuss the role of the author in the partition process.
Abstract: Acknowledgements List of abbreviations 1. By way of introduction 2. The three partitions of 1947 3. Historians' history 4. The evidence of the historian 5. Folding the local into the national: Garhmukhteshwar, November 1946 6. Folding the national into the local: Delhi, 1947-8 7. Disciplining difference 8. Constructing community Select bibliography Index.

213 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that the patrimonial bureaucratic empire, a model developed by Max Weber, better captures the true character of the Mughal polity than the British-Indian Empire.
Abstract: An earlier generation of Mughal scholars used the British-Indian Empire of the late Imperial period (c. 1875–1914) as its model for interpreting the Mughal state. The highly structured military, judicial, and administrative systems of the British Raj provided the perspective from which they viewed the material on the Mughal state contained in the Persian sources. Unfortunately, the assumptions implicit in this approach caused both a misreading of the Persian texts and a misunderstanding of the Mughal state. This essay argues that the patrimonial bureaucratic empire, a model developed by Max Weber, better captures the true character of the Mughal polity. A close analysis of the major Persian text on Mughal government, the A'in-i Akbari of Abu al-Fazl, demonstrates the superiority and appropriateness of the patrimonial-bureaucratic empire as a model for understanding the Mughal state.

130 citations

Book
03 May 2018
TL;DR: Sebastian R. Prange as mentioned in this paper argues that this "Monsoon Islam" was shaped by merchants not sultans, forged by commercial imperatives rather than in battle, and defined by the reality of Muslims living within non-Muslim societies.
Abstract: Between the twelfth and sixteenth centuries, a distinct form of Islamic thought and practice developed among Muslim trading communities of the Indian Ocean. Sebastian R. Prange argues that this 'Monsoon Islam' was shaped by merchants not sultans, forged by commercial imperatives rather than in battle, and defined by the reality of Muslims living within non-Muslim societies. Focusing on India's Malabar Coast, the much-fabled 'land of pepper', Prange provides a case study of how Monsoon Islam developed in response to concrete economic, socio-religious, and political challenges. Because communities of Muslim merchants across the Indian Ocean were part of shared commercial, scholarly, and political networks, developments on the Malabar Coast illustrate a broader, trans-oceanic history of the evolution of Islam across monsoon Asia. This history is told through four spaces that are examined in their physical manifestations as well as symbolic meanings: the Port, the Mosque, the Palace, and the Sea.

89 citations

Book
Emma Tomalin1
03 Jul 2013
TL;DR: The role of faith-based organizations (FBOs) in development is discussed in this article, where the authors discuss the role of FBOs in the 21st century.
Abstract: 1. Introduction: Religions and Development: A New Agenda 2. Approaches to the Theory and Practice of Development: From 'Estrangement' to 'Engagement' with Religions 3. Concepts and Theories for Studying Religions Globally 4. Religious Approaches to Development 5. Human Rights, Religions and Development 6. Gender, Religions and Development 7. Environmentalism, Religions and Development 8. Researching and Understanding the Role of 'Faith-based Organizations' (FBOs) in Development 9. Conclusion: Religions and International Development in the 21st Century

87 citations