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Issa J. Boullata

Bio: Issa J. Boullata is an academic researcher from McGill University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Arabic literature & Poetry. The author has an hindex of 10, co-authored 34 publications receiving 250 citations.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the Qu'ran: sacred text and cultural yardstick is used to define a critical tradition for the literary tradition, including poetry, prose, drama, and drama.
Abstract: Preface Chronology 1. An essay on precedents and principles 2. The contexts of the literary tradition 3. The Qu'ran: sacred text and cultural yardstick 4. Poetry 5. belletristic prose and narrative 6. Drama 7. The critical tradition Guide to further reading.

30 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present varying discourses pertaining to women's work and how it is impacted by interpretations of Islam, including Muslim scholars on the one hand and active feminists on the other.
Abstract: Purpose – This paper attempts to present varying discourses pertaining to women's work and how it is impacted by interpretations of Islam.Design/methodology/approach – Current discourses from various viewpoints are presented including Muslim scholars on the one hand and active feminists on the other. Personalities are presented as being representative of the debate that has been going on pertaining to women in Arab societies.Findings – Attempts that aim at categorizing Arab thought and activism into two camps, one is religious‐based adverse to women's causes, and the other being secular and supportive of their causes does not present a candid depiction of the different forces.Research limitations/implications – Personalities chosen represent specific case studies that, although thought to be representative, cannot realistically reflect all the multitudes of views expressed pertaining to the issues discussed. Future studies may cover other relevant personalities in the region.Practical implications – Devel...

221 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The prevailing view that music cognition matures more slowly than language and is more difficult; instead, it is argued that music learning matches the speed and effort of language acquisition.
Abstract: Language is typically viewed as fundamental to human intelligence. Music, while recognized as a human universal, is often treated as an ancillary ability—one dependent on or derivative of language. In contrast, we argue that it is more productive from a developmental perspective to describe spoken language as a special type of music. A review of existing studies presents a compelling case that musical hearing and ability is essential to language acquisition. In addition, the authors challenge the prevailing view that music cognition matures more slowly than language and is more difficult; instead, the authors present evidence that music learning matches the speed and effort of language acquisition. We conclude that music merits a central place in our understanding of human development.

159 citations

Book ChapterDOI
TL;DR: The fact that 15 of the 19 terrorists who attacked the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001 were Saudi citizens inevitably raised serious questions about the social conditions that have produced such violent personalities capable of the mass taking of innocent lives and devastating an entire city, if not a nation.
Abstract: The fact that 15 of the 19 terrorists who attacked the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001 were Saudi citizens inevitably raised serious questions about the social conditions that have produced such violent personalities capable of the mass taking of innocent lives and devastating an entire city, if not a nation. Answers were quick to come by, as the U.S. media pointed to the Saudi culture. Charges were made that the youth were brainwashed by the most extremist school in Islam, namely, Wahhabism. The Saudi educational institutions were also blamed for promoting anti-Semitism, anti-Western attitudes, and intolerance of other religions. Saudi society was also condemned for having a corrupt and backward political system. Naturally, in this land of intolerance and authoritarianism, resorting to violence by its inhabitants became a foregone conclusion (Baer 2003; Gold 2003; Schwartz 2002).

83 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Insight is provided into the meanings of childbirth for Muslim women living in Jordan that assist nurses in providing culturally competent care.
Abstract: This descriptive, ethnographic study focuses on the experience of childbirth for Muslim women living in Jordan. Thirty-two childbearing women were interviewed in the early postpartum weeks. The audiotaped interviews were transcribed and translated. Themes were identified from the rich, narrative data. Motivations for having children, as well as what constitutes the motherhood feeling, were described. Themes also included the importance of relying on God or Allah for support in childbearing and child rearing. A strong sense of the spiritual dimensions of giving birth within women's traditional, religious, and cultural context was identified. Findings from this study provide insight into the meanings of childbirth for Muslim women living in Jordan. These meanings assist nurses in providing culturally competent care.

74 citations