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Author

J. A. Bondy

Bio: J. A. Bondy is an academic researcher from University of Waterloo. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Regular graph & Graph factorization. The author has an hindex of 7, co-authored 8 publication(s) receiving 7796 citation(s).

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1976
Abstract: (1977). Graph Theory with Applications. Journal of the Operational Research Society: Vol. 28, Volume 28, issue 1, pp. 237-238.

7,219 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The progress made on the Reconstruction Conjecture is reviewed, up to isomorphism, since it was first formulated in 1941 and a number of related questions are discussed.
Abstract: The Reconstruction Conjecture asserts that every finite simple undirected graph on three or more vertices is determined, up to isomorphism, by its collection of vertex-deleted subgraphs. This article reviews the progress made on the conjecture since it was first formulated in 1941 and discusses a number of related questions.

248 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A.A. Vince introduced a natural generalization of graph coloring and proved some basic facts, revealing it to be a concept of interest, and his work relies on continuous methods.
Abstract: A. Vince introduced a natural generalization of graph coloring and proved some basic facts, revealing it to be a concept of interest. His work relies on continuous methods. In this note we make some simple observations that lead to a purely combinatorial treatment. Our methods yield shorter proofs and offer further insight.

162 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: On presente un algorithme polynomial permettant de determiner un sous-graphe biparti d'un graphe G sans triangle ni boucle de degre maximum 3, contenant au moins 4/5 des aretes de G. On caracterise le dodecaedre et le graphe de Petersen comme les seuls graphes connexes 3-reguliers sans triangle ni boucle pour lesquels il n'existe pas de sous graphe biparti ayant un nombre d'aretes superieur a cette proportion

84 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is proved that every simple 3-regular graph admits a PPDC consisting of paths of length three, which is equivalent to a perfect path double cover of a graph G on n vertices.
Abstract: A perfect path double cover (PPDC) of a graph G on n vertices is a family of n paths of G such that each edge of G belongs to exactly two members of and each vertex of G occurs exactly twice as an end of a path of . We propose and study the conjecture that every simple graph admits a PPDC. Among other things, we prove that every simple 3-regular graph admits a PPDC consisting of paths of length three.

37 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: When n identical randomly located nodes, each capable of transmitting at W bits per second and using a fixed range, form a wireless network, the throughput /spl lambda/(n) obtainable by each node for a randomly chosen destination is /spl Theta/(W//spl radic/(nlogn)) bits persecond under a noninterference protocol.
Abstract: When n identical randomly located nodes, each capable of transmitting at W bits per second and using a fixed range, form a wireless network, the throughput /spl lambda/(n) obtainable by each node for a randomly chosen destination is /spl Theta/(W//spl radic/(nlogn)) bits per second under a noninterference protocol. If the nodes are optimally placed in a disk of unit area, traffic patterns are optimally assigned, and each transmission's range is optimally chosen, the bit-distance product that can be transported by the network per second is /spl Theta/(W/spl radic/An) bit-meters per second. Thus even under optimal circumstances, the throughput is only /spl Theta/(W//spl radic/n) bits per second for each node for a destination nonvanishingly far away. Similar results also hold under an alternate physical model where a required signal-to-interference ratio is specified for successful receptions. Fundamentally, it is the need for every node all over the domain to share whatever portion of the channel it is utilizing with nodes in its local neighborhood that is the reason for the constriction in capacity. Splitting the channel into several subchannels does not change any of the results. Some implications may be worth considering by designers. Since the throughput furnished to each user diminishes to zero as the number of users is increased, perhaps networks connecting smaller numbers of users, or featuring connections mostly with nearby neighbors, may be more likely to be find acceptance.

8,892 citations

Book
01 Jan 1976
Abstract: (1977). Graph Theory with Applications. Journal of the Operational Research Society: Vol. 28, Volume 28, issue 1, pp. 237-238.

7,219 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This algorithm gives the first substantial progress in approximating MAX CUT in nearly twenty years, and represents the first use of semidefinite programming in the design of approximation algorithms.
Abstract: We present randomized approximation algorithms for the maximum cut (MAX CUT) and maximum 2-satisfiability (MAX 2SAT) problems that always deliver solutions of expected value at least.87856 times the optimal value. These algorithms use a simple and elegant technique that randomly rounds the solution to a nonlinear programming relaxation. This relaxation can be interpreted both as a semidefinite program and as an eigenvalue minimization problem. The best previously known approximation algorithms for these problems had performance guarantees of 1/2 for MAX CUT and 3/4 or MAX 2SAT. Slight extensions of our analysis lead to a.79607-approximation algorithm for the maximum directed cut problem (MAX DICUT) and a.758-approximation algorithm for MAX SAT, where the best previously known approximation algorithms had performance guarantees of 1/4 and 3/4, respectively. Our algorithm gives the first substantial progress in approximating MAX CUT in nearly twenty years, and represents the first use of semidefinite programming in the design of approximation algorithms.

3,580 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this survey I have collected everything I could find on graph labelings techniques that have appeared in journals that are not widely available.
Abstract: A graph labeling is an assignment of integers to the vertices or edges, or both, subject to certain conditions. Graph labelings were first introduced in the late 1960s. In the intervening years dozens of graph labelings techniques have been studied in over 1000 papers. Finding out what has been done for any particular kind of labeling and keeping up with new discoveries is difficult because of the sheer number of papers and because many of the papers have appeared in journals that are not widely available. In this survey I have collected everything I could find on graph labeling. For the convenience of the reader the survey includes a detailed table of contents and index.

2,233 citations

Book
20 May 2005
Abstract: A text that makes the mathematical underpinnings of robot motion accessible and relates low-level details of implementation to high-level algorithmic concepts. Robot motion planning has become a major focus of robotics. Research findings can be applied not only to robotics but to planning routes on circuit boards, directing digital actors in computer graphics, robot-assisted surgery and medicine, and in novel areas such as drug design and protein folding. This text reflects the great advances that have taken place in the last ten years, including sensor-based planning, probabalistic planning, localization and mapping, and motion planning for dynamic and nonholonomic systems. Its presentation makes the mathematical underpinnings of robot motion accessible to students of computer science and engineering, rleating low-level implementation details to high-level algorithmic concepts.

1,810 citations