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J. C. Bramble

Bio: J. C. Bramble is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 93 citations.

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MonographDOI
TL;DR: Statius' Silvae, written late in the reign of Domitian (AD 81-96), are a new kind of poetry that confronts the challenge of imperial majesty or private wealth by new poetic strategies and forms as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Statius' Silvae, written late in the reign of Domitian (AD 81–96), are a new kind of poetry that confronts the challenge of imperial majesty or private wealth by new poetic strategies and forms. As poems of praise, they delight in poetic excess whether they honour the emperor or the poet's friends. Yet extravagant speech is also capacious speech. It functions as a strategy for conveying the wealth and grandeur of villas, statues and precious works of art as well as the complex emotions aroused by the material and political culture of empire. The Silvae are the product of a divided, self-fashioning voice. Statius was born in Naples of non-aristocratic parents. His position as outsider to the culture he celebrates gives him a unique perspective on it. The Silvae are poems of anxiety as well as praise, expressive of the tensions within the later period of Domitian's reign.

127 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The figure of the lena in the elegies of Tibullus (I.5; II.6), Propertius (IV.5), and Ovid (Amores I.8) is investigated in this paper.
Abstract: This paper investigates the figure of the lena in the elegies of Tibullus (I.5; II.6), Propertius (IV.5), and Ovid (Amores I.8). While each poet treats the character of the lena in importantly different ways, each has in common a deep interest in contrasting his own position as both lover and poet with the activities of the lena, a bawd or procuress. All three poets curse the lena, denouncing primarily her malevolent magical powers, her carmina, which are directed against them and their carmina. The lena not only preaches an erotic code which in its emphasis on remuneration and the denigration of poetry directly opposes that of the poet-lover, she also usurps his role as instructor and constructor of the elegiac puella. It is the elegiac poet's prerogative to describe and construct the elegiac mistress. By usurping his role as praeceptor, the lena threatens the poet with both sexual and literary impotence. It is precisely because the lena challenges the male poet-lover's control over these terms that she is such a potent enemy; the woman with a pen, as Pollack writes in The Poetics of Sexual Myth, ‘threatens to undermine a system of signification that defines her both as vulnerable and as victim’. If the elegiac mistress can be said to play a more masterful role as domina in Roman love poetry than in conventional Roman ideology, it must nevertheless be qualified with the reminder that she only plays a role constructed for her by elegy's first-person narrator who demands complete control over the discourse of their relationship, of the rules of the amatory game.

84 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: In Amores 3.7, Ovid sings, hymns, and celebrates his own impotence as discussed by the authors, which is an erotic poem, and could even be considered a gentle one, perhaps excepting the couplet 67f.
Abstract: nos quoque delectant, quamuis nocuere, libelli,quodque mihi telum uulnera fecit, amo.(Tr. 4.1.35f.)My books delight me, even though they have harmed me,and I love the weapon which caused my wound.In Amores 3.7, Ovid sings, hymns, celebrates his own impotence. Why?In stark contrast with its nearest Latin relative, Horace's most grotesque, violent and abusive impotence poem (Epode 12, to be discussed later), Am. 3.7 is an erotic poem, and could even be considered a gentle one, perhaps excepting the couplet 67f. which is the emphatic opposite of the rest of the poem.

74 citations

Book
20 Sep 2018
TL;DR: In this article, the poetics of power and the psychology of despotism are discussed in the context of politics, violence, and memory in the Roman Republic, and the cosmopolis.
Abstract: 1. Cicero: to save the res publica 2. Lucretius: the poetics of power: 3. Sallust: giving endurance to memory 4. Virgil: politics, violence, and memory 5. Livy: political thought as remedium 6. Seneca and jurisdiction 7. Tacitus: the political psychology of despotism 8. Marcus Aurelius and the cosmopolis 9. Augustine: political thought as confession.

65 citations