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J. M. Taccetti

Bio: J. M. Taccetti is an academic researcher from Los Alamos National Laboratory. The author has contributed to research in topics: Wiggler & Magnetized target fusion. The author has an hindex of 13, co-authored 49 publications receiving 521 citations. Previous affiliations of J. M. Taccetti include United States Naval Research Laboratory & United States Department of the Navy.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a field reversed configuration (FRC) target plasma has been chosen that will ultimately be compressed within an imploding metal liner to demonstrate the physics basis for MTF.
Abstract: Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is a potentially low cost path to fusion, intermediate in plasma regime between magnetic and inertial fusion energy It requires compression of a magnetized target plasma and consequent heating to fusion relevant conditions inside a converging flux conserver To demonstrate the physics basis for MTF, a field reversed configuration (FRC) target plasma has been chosen that will ultimately be compressed within an imploding metal liner The required FRC will need large density, and this regime is being explored by the FRX–L (FRC-Liner) experiment All theta pinch formed FRCs have some shock heating during formation, but FRX–L depends further on large ohmic heating from magnetic flux annihilation to heat the high density (2–5×1022 m−3), plasma to a temperature of Te+Ti≈500 eV At the field null, anomalous resistivity is typically invoked to characterize the resistive like flux dissipation process The first resistivity estimate for a high density collisional FRC is shown here The flux dissipation process is both a key issue for MTF and an important underlying physics question

80 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe the experiment and technology leading to a target plasma for the magnetized target fusion research effort, an approach to fusion wherein a plasma with embedded magnetic fields is formed and subsequently adiabatically compressed to fusion conditions.
Abstract: We describe the experiment and technology leading to a target plasma for the magnetized target fusion research effort, an approach to fusion wherein a plasma with embedded magnetic fields is formed and subsequently adiabatically compressed to fusion conditions. The target plasmas under consideration, field-reversed configurations (FRCs), have the required closed-field-line topology and are translatable and compressible. Our goal is to form high-density (1017 cm−3) FRCs on the field-reversed experiment-liner (FRX-L) device, inside a 36 cm long, 6.2 cm radius theta coil, with 5 T peak magnetic field and an azimuthal electric field as high as 1 kV/cm. FRCs have been formed with an equilibrium density ne≈(1 to 2)×1016 cm−3, Te+Ti≈250 eV, and excluded flux ≈2 to 3 mWb.

63 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the design and first successful demonstration of an imploding solid liner with height to diameter ratio, radial convergence, and uniformity suitable for compressing a field reversed configuration is discussed.
Abstract: The design and first successful demonstration of an imploding solid liner with height to diameter ratio, radial convergence, and uniformity suitable for compressing a field reversed configuration is discussed. Radiographs indicated a very symmetric implosion with no instability growth, with /spl sim/13x radial compression of the inner liner surface prior to impacting a central measurement unit. The implosion kinetic energy was 1.5 megajoules, 34% of the capacitor stored energy of 4.4 megajoules.

51 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
04 May 2004
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe a program to demonstrate the scientific basis of magnetized target fusion (MTF), which is a potentially low-cost path to fusion which is intermediate in plasma regime between magnetic (MFE) and inertial fusion energy (IFE).
Abstract: We describe a program to demonstrate the scientific basis of magnetized target fusion (MTF). MTF is a potentially low-cost path to fusion which is intermediate in plasma regime between magnetic (MFE) and inertial fusion energy (IFE). MTF involves the compression of a magnetized target plasma and pressure times volume (PdV) heating to fusion relevant conditions inside a converging flux conserving boundary. We have chosen to demonstrate MTF by using a field-reversed configuration (FRC) as our magnetized target plasma and an imploding metal liner for compression. These choices take advantage of significant past scientific and technical accomplishments in MFE and defense programs research and should yield substantial plasma performance (n/spl tau/>10/sup 13/ s-cm/sup -3/ T>5 keV) using an available pulsed-power implosion facility at modest cost. We have recently shown the density, temperature, and lifetime of this FRC to be within a factor of 2-3 of that required for use as a suitable target plasma for MTF compression for a fusion demonstration.

44 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a three-dimensional nonlinear formulation of a free-electron laser based upon a coaxial hybrid iron (CHI) wiggler is described, which is in good agreement with the Poisson/Superfish group of codes.
Abstract: A three‐dimensional nonlinear formulation of a free‐electron laser based upon a coaxial hybrid iron (CHI) wiggler is described. The CHI wiggler is created by insertion of a central rod and an outer ring [composed of alternating ferrite and dielectric spacers in which the ferrite (dielectric) spacer on the central rod is opposite to the dielectric (ferrite) spacer on the outer ring] along the axis of a solenoidal. An analytic model of the CHI wiggler is developed which is in good agreement with the Poisson/Superfish group of codes. The free‐electron laser (FEL) formulation is a slow‐time‐scale analysis of the interaction of an annular electron beam with the CHI wiggler in a coaxial waveguide. The electromagnetic field is represented as the superposition of the vacuum transverse electric (TE), transverse magnetic (TM), and transverse electromagnetic (TEM) modes of the waveguide, and a set of nonlinear second‐order differential equations is derived for the amplitudes and phases of these modes. These equation...

38 citations


Cited by
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TL;DR: Lindemuth et al. as discussed by the authors showed that significant fusion yields can be obtained by pulsed-power-driven implosions of cylindrical metal liners onto magnetized (>10T) and preheated (100-500 eV) deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel.
Abstract: The radial convergence required to reach fusion conditions is considerably higher for cylindrical than for spherical implosions since the volume is proportional to r2 versus r3, respectively. Fuel magnetization and preheat significantly lowers the required radial convergence enabling cylindrical implosions to become an attractive path toward generating fusion conditions. Numerical simulations are presented indicating that significant fusion yields may be obtained by pulsed-power-driven implosions of cylindrical metal liners onto magnetized (>10 T) and preheated (100–500 eV) deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. Yields exceeding 100 kJ could be possible on Z at 25 MA, while yields exceeding 50 MJ could be possible with a more advanced pulsed power machine delivering 60 MA. These implosions occur on a much shorter time scale than previously proposed implosions, about 100 ns as compared to about 10 μs for magnetic target fusion (MTF) [I. R. Lindemuth and R. C. Kirkpatrick, Nucl. Fusion 23, 263 (1983)]. Consequently t...

492 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of the development of high-power gyrotron oscillators for long-pulse or CW operation and pulsed gyrotrons for many applications can be found in this article.
Abstract: This paper presents a review of the experimental achievements related to the development of high-power gyrotron oscillators for long-pulse or CW operation and pulsed gyrotrons for many applications. In addition, this work gives a short overview on the present development status of frequency step-tunable and multi-frequency gyrotrons, coaxial-cavity multi-megawatt gyrotrons, gyrotrons for technological and spectroscopy applications, relativistic gyrotrons, large orbit gyrotrons (LOGs), quasi-optical gyrotrons, fast- and slow-wave cyclotron autoresonance masers (CARMs), gyroklystrons, gyro-TWT amplifiers, gyrotwystron amplifiers, gyro-BWOs, gyro-harmonic converters, gyro-peniotrons, magnicons, free electron masers (FEMs), and dielectric vacuum windows for such high-power mm-wave sources. Gyrotron oscillators (gyromonotrons) are mainly used as high-power millimeter wave sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), stability control, and diagnostics of magnetically confined plasmas for clean generation of energy by controlled thermonuclear fusion. The maximum pulse length of commercially available 140 GHz, megawatt-class gyrotrons employing synthetic diamond output windows is 30 min (CPI and European KIT-SPC-THALES collaboration). The world record parameters of the European tube are as follows: 0.92 MW output power at 30-min pulse duration, 97.5% Gaussian mode purity, and 44% efficiency, employing a single-stage depressed collector (SDC) for energy recovery. A maximum output power of 1.5 MW in 4.0-s pulses at 45% efficiency was generated with the QST-TOSHIBA (now CANON) 110-GHz gyrotron. The Japan 170-GHz ITER gyrotron achieved 1 MW, 800 s at 55% efficiency and holds the energy world record of 2.88 GJ (0.8 MW, 60 min) and the efficiency record of 57% for tubes with an output power of more than 0.5 MW. The Russian 170-GHz ITER gyrotron obtained 0.99 (1.2) MW with a pulse duration of 1000 (100) s and 53% efficiency. The prototype tube of the European 2-MW, 170-GHz coaxial-cavity gyrotron achieved in short pulses the record power of 2.2 MW at 48% efficiency and 96% Gaussian mode purity. Gyrotrons with pulsed magnet for various short-pulse applications deliver Pout = 210 kW with τ = 20 μs at frequencies up to 670 GHz (η ≅ 20%), Pout = 5.3 kW at 1 THz (η = 6.1%), and Pout = 0.5 kW at 1.3 THz (η = 0.6%). Gyrotron oscillators have also been successfully used in materials processing. Such technological applications require tubes with the following parameters: f > 24 GHz, Pout = 4–50 kW, CW, η > 30%. The CW powers produced by gyroklystrons and FEMs are 10 kW (94 GHz) and 36 W (15 GHz), respectively. The IR FEL at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in the USA obtained a record average power of 14.2 kW at a wavelength of 1.6 μm. The THz FEL (NOVEL) at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in Russia achieved a maximum average power of 0.5 kW at wavelengths 50–240 μm (6.00–1.25 THz).

279 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Numerical simulations are presented showing that high-gain MIF is possible in cylindrical liner implosions based on the MagLIF concept with the addition of a cryogenic layer of deuterium-tritium (DT).
Abstract: Magnetized inertial fusion (MIF) could substantially ease the difficulty of reaching plasma conditions required for significant fusion yields, but it has been widely accepted that the gain is not sufficient for fusion energy. Numerical simulations are presented showing that high-gain MIF is possible in cylindrical liner implosions based on the MagLIF concept [S. A. Slutz et al Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] with the addition of a cryogenic layer of deuterium-tritium (DT). These simulations show that a burn wave propagates radially from the magnetized hot spot into the surrounding much denser cold DT given sufficient hot-spot areal density. For a drive current of 60 MA the simulated gain exceeds 100, which is more than adequate for fusion energy applications. The simulated gain exceeds 1000 for a drive current of 70 MA.

237 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of field-reversed configurations (FRCs) can be found in this article, which considers FRCs under familiar topical categories: equilibrium, global stability, self-organization, transport, formation and sustainment.
Abstract: This review addresses field-reversed configurations (FRCs), which are compact-toroidal magnetic systems with little or no toroidal field and very high β (ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure). Although enthusiasm for the FRC has primarily been driven by its potential for an attractive fusion reactor, this review focuses on the physics rather than on technological or engineering aspects. Major advances in both theory and experiment have taken place since the previous comprehensive FRC review in 1988. Even so many questions remain. In particular, even though FRC experiments have exhibited remarkable stability, how well this extrapolates to larger systems remains unresolved. The review considers FRCs under familiar topical categories: equilibrium, global stability, self-organization, transport, formation, and sustainment.

217 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a magnetic field of 80 kG was embedded in the target and was subsequently trapped and compressed by the imploding conductive plasma, and the observed ion temperature and fusion yield were enhanced by 15% and 30%, respectively.
Abstract: Enhancement of the ion temperature and fusion yield has been observed in magnetized laser-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions on the OMEGA Laser Facility. A spherical CH target with a 10 atm ${\mathrm{D}}_{2}$ gas fill was imploded in a polar-drive configuration. A magnetic field of 80 kG was embedded in the target and was subsequently trapped and compressed by the imploding conductive plasma. As a result of the hot-spot magnetization, the electron radial heat losses were suppressed and the observed ion temperature and neutron yield were enhanced by 15% and 30%, respectively.

172 citations