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J. Y. Yang

Bio: J. Y. Yang is an academic researcher from National Taiwan University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Oblique shock & Mach number. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 41 citations.

Papers
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TL;DR: In this paper, a second-order high-resolution scheme for solving the new Lagrangian Euler equations is employed to accurately resolve the complicated shock patterns and associated slip lines and their interactions.
Abstract: A computational analysis of the two-dimensional supersonic inviscid flowfield in a second-throat ejector-diffuser (STED) system is presented. A second-order high-resolution scheme for solving the new Lagrangian Euler equations is employed to accurately resolve the complicated shock patterns and associated slip lines and their interactions. A parametric study covering a variety of Xst and Ost is implemented to investigate their effects on the flow structure in STED as well as its performance. Results suggest that the averaged Mach number along the entrance plane of the second throat is a suitable criterion for the justification of the performance of STED. With this criterion, an optimal design insuring the largest pressure recovery can be achieved.

41 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the performance of six well-known turbulence models for the study of supersonic ejectors was evaluated and the results showed that the k-omega-sst model agrees best with experiments.

323 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, numerical results of a supersonic ejector for refrigeration applications are presented, which is based on the NIST-this articlePROP database for refrigerants properties calculations.

163 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 2010-Energy
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors conducted a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) investigation into the flow structure inside a steam ejector and found that the ejector with a converging duct angle of 1° has the best performance.

83 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe the construction of a multidimensional simulation capability built around an Eulerian pseudo-fluid approach, where the fluid is treated as being in a non-thermodynamic equilibrium state, and a modified form of the homogenous relaxation model (HRM) is employed.
Abstract: Condensing ejectors utilize the beneficial thermodynamics of condensation to produce an exiting static pressure that can be in excess of either entering static pressure. The phase change process is driven by both turbulent mixing and interphase heat transfer. Semi-empirical models can be used in conjunction with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to gain some understanding of how condensing ejectors should be designed and operated. The current work describes the construction of a multidimensional simulation capability built around an Eulerian pseudo-fluid approach. The fluid is treated as being in a non-thermodynamic equilibrium state, and a modified form of the homogenous relaxation model (HRM) is employed. The CFD code is constructed using the open-source OpenFOAM library. Using carbon dioxide as the working fluid, the results of the simulations show a pressure rise that is comparable to experimental data. It is also observed that the flow is near thermodynamic equilibrium in the diffuser, suggesting that turbulence effects present the greatest challenge in modeling these ejectors.

81 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
06 Mar 2019
TL;DR: A review of the main developments in ejectors over the last few years can be found in this article, where the main findings and trends in the area of heat-driven ejectors and ejector-based machines using low boiling point working fluids are summarized.
Abstract: Ejectors used in refrigeration systems as entrainment and compression components or expanders, alone or in combination with other equipment devices, have gained renewed interest from the scientific community as a means of low temperature heat recovery and more efficient energy use. This paper summarizes the main findings and trends, in the area of heat-driven ejectors and ejector-based machines, using low boiling point working fluids, which were reported in the literature for a number of promising applications. An overall view of such systems is provided by discussing the ejector physics principles, as well as a review of the main developments in ejectors over the last few years. Recent achievements on thermally activated ejectors for single-phase compressible fluids are the main focus in this part of the review. Aspects related to their design, operation, theoretical and experimental approaches employed, analysis of the complex interacting phenomena taking place within the device, and performance are highlighted. Conventional and improved ejector refrigeration cycles are discussed. Some cycles of interest employing ejectors alone or boosted combinations are presented and their potential applications are indicated.

70 citations